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This webpage is, and will probably always be, under development. As my knowledge of Norse naming grows, I will keep revising and updating this page. At this point, I'm aware that the page is really too large, and I'm working out better methods of presentation.

Some of my sources listed names that were either hypothetical forms re-constructed based on place-name and later personal name evidence, or else doubtful interpretations from runic evidence. These have been included, but are shown with the headword in a greyed-out text, for example, kimann.

In the list below, I have abbreviated certain source references as follows:

  • CV = Cleasby, Richard and Gubrandr Vigfusson. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon. 1957.

  • GB = Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Studia Marklandica I. Olney, MD: Markland Medieval Militia. 1977.

  • FJ = Fellows-Jensen, Gillian. Scandinavian Personal Names in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. Copenhagen. Akademisk Forlag. 1968.

  • NR = Lena Peterson. Nordiskt runnamnslexikon. (Dictionary of Names from Old Norse Runic Inscriptions). Sprk- och folkminnes-institutet (Institute for Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research). Accessed 30 September 2005.

For full details on any source referenced, please see the Bibliography.

 
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Name Notes Source
gileif The first element gi- may be related to Old Icelandic gir, "the sea or the god of the sea", found in compounds as gisandr "sea-sand" or the Icelandic place-name gisia. Alternately, it may be related to Old Icelandic gja, "to frighten, make terrible, found in compounds such as gilikr, "terrible, awful". The second element -leif, -lif or -lof is a feminine name element derived from Primitive Scandinavian *-laib a formation from the stem in OW.Norse leif "inheritance, legacy", but as an element in personal names "one who comes after, heir" and thus to -lifR/-lafR. Variants in -lof derive from a Primitive Scandinavian shortening of /ai/ > /a/. This name appears in Landnmabk ch. 46 for gileif rsteinsdttir and in ch. 72 for gileif Hrlfsdttir. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 758 s.v. gir, gja, gilikr; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
rinnds, rnds The first elementes rn-, rnn-, rin-, rinn- comprise alternate forms of the OW.Norse bird-names orn, ari "eagle", or may also be related to OW.Norse arinn "hearth". The second element -ds is identical with the Old Icelandic ds, "goddess, priestess, female guardian spirit." Found in Old Swedish as rndis; compare with OW.Norse Arnds. Occurs in the runic nominative forms erintis and erntis. NR s.v. r(in)nds, r(in)n-/r(in)n-, -ds
ringunnr For the first elementes rn-, rnn-, rin-, rinn- see above. The second element -gunnr (and the related forms -gur and -gundr) is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *guni, < *guni and is identical with Old Icelandic gunnr, gur, "war, battle." Found in Old Swedish as rngun; compare with OW.Norse Arngunnr. Occurs in the runic accusative form erinkuni. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. ringunnr, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
sa May perhaps be identical to Old Icelandic sa, "to stir up, incite, stir up war". This name appears in Landnmabk in ch. 40 for sa of Svney, the mother of Eyjlfr; sa Oddleifsdttir in ch. 46; sa, the daughter of Ljtlfr goa in ch. 65; sa, daughter of Hrlfr rauskeggr ("red-beard") in ch. 72; and for sa, daughter of Jarl Hkon Grjtgarsson in ch. 99. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 759 s.v. sa
sileif The first element si- may be identical to the first element si-, "violently, furiously", found in Old Icelandic compounds such as siliga, "violently, furiously", siligr, "vehement". For the second element -leif see above. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 759 s.v. si; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
tta This name is found in Old Danish as Etta and in Old Swedish as tta. It may represent a short form of the woman's name strr. Occurs in the runic accusative form etu. NR s.v. tta
ds, dsa The etymology of the first element - is uncertain, as it may come from several possible origins: < *ana-, the intensive first element, "all"; < *anu- "ancestor, forefather"; or from < *az- "point, edge" or "anxiety, fear". For the second element -ds see above. A weak side-form exists, dsa. Found in Old Swedish as Adis. ds is found in Swedish runic inscriptions as ais, while the runic form of the weak side form is found in Ostergotland, Sweden as ntisa. NR s.v. ds, dsa
Asla The feminine form of the Old West Norse masculine name Ails. The name is derived from *Aa-gslaR, with the first element A- being from either *aa- or else from *aal- "noble, foremost". The second element is from -gsl or its side-form -gils, and may be related to the Langobard word gsil "arrow-shaft" and also to OW.Norse geisl m. "staff", geisli m. "sun-beam"; a shaft typical of a weapon or a part of a weapon, or the second element may also be linked to OW.Norse gsl m. "hostage". Asla is found in Swedish runic inscriptions as o[is]la. NR s.v. Asla, A-, -gsl
frr For the first element - see above. The second element -frr is from the OW.Norse adjective frr "beautiful" in the original sense of "beloved" and related to the OW.Norse verb frj "to love". This name is found in Old Swedish as Afridh. Runic forms include the nominative forms afiri, afri, afri, afri, (a)frir, ifri, ifrir and the accusative form afrii. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. frr, -, -frr, Fra
gerr, grr For the first element - see above. The second element -gerr or -grr is probably derived from *-gari and related to the second element -garr, which is identical to OW.Norse garr "fence, defense". A runic instance occurs in the nominative case as aker. NR s.v. grr, -, -grr, -garr
Agata Christian, Agatha GB pp. 7
Agnes Christian, "lamb of God" GB pp. 7
Alds The first element Al- or l- is derived from *alu, "protection, fortune." The second element -ds is identical with the Old Icelandic ds, "goddess, priestess, female guardian spirit." This name appears in chs. 90 and 98 of Landnmabk for Alds feigsdttir, the mother of Valla-Brandr. A runic example is found in the nominative case as alfti. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds; NR s.v. Al-, -ds, Dsa
lfds, Alfds The first element Alf- is identical with Old Icelandic alfr, "elf." For the second element -ds see above. Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as lfds Konallsdttir, the wife of lfr feilan ("wolf-cub"). This name appears in Landnmabk for lfds Konlsdttur in chs. 40 and 98; and for lfds Gamlisdttir, mother of Oddr munk in ch. 55. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds; NR s.v. Alfds, Alf-, -ds
Aldrf This name is of uncertain etymology. The first element is perhaps Al- (see above). The second element may be -drf, related to the second element in the OW.Norse feminine name Sigrdrf or Sigrdrfa, which is found as both a mythological name and as a personal name. A different opinion holds that the second element is a shortened form of Sigrdrf or Sigrdrfa. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as altrifaR. FJ pp. 342; NR s.v. Aldrf, Al-
lfeir For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -heir is identical to the Old Icelandic heir, "heath", but usually drops the initial h in name-compounds. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 247 s.v. heir
Alhildr, lfhildr For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -hildr is identical to Old Icelandic hildr, "battle" and ultimately derives from Primitive Scandinavian *heldi. Found in Old Danish as Alvild, OW.Norse lfhildr. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as alhiltar. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr; NR s.v. Al(f)hildr, Alf-, -hildr
Alffa, lffa The first element may perhaps be from Alf- (see above) or from Al- (see above). The second element ffa may perhaps be identical with Old Icelandic ffa, used metaphorically in poetry as "arrow". A similar word, ffla, is found in Grettis saga meaning "a girl". GB pp. 7, 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 155 s.v. ffa, ffla
Alfrn For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -rn is from OW.Norse rn, itself derived from Germanic *rn, with an original sense of "secret, hidden knowledge". As a second element -rn should be understood as having the meaning, "she who possesses hidden knowledge". Found in West Scandinavia as a mythological name, and as the Old English name lfrun. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. FJ pp. 8, 342, 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rn; NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
lmveig The first element lm- is probably identical with Old Icelandic lmr, "elm, elm-tree". The etymology of the second element -veig is unclear. It may derive from OW.Norse veig "strong, powerful," which comes from Germanic *waiz, or it may instead come from OW.Norse vg "battle" and the OW.Norse adjective vgr "competent in battle, skilled with weapons". There is a slight possibility that -veig may instead be derived from OW.Norse v "holy place" (compare with the Gothic adjective weihs "holy"). Cleasby-Vigfusson suggests a fourth possible derivation, from Old Icelandic veig, "a strong drink, alcoholic beverage" used of beer and the Mead of Poetry. It is uncertain whether the name lmveig was ever used of human persons, as it appears in the Hyndlulj in the Poetic Edda. CV pp. 43, 690 s.v. lmr, veig; NR s.v. -vig
lof, lof The feminine form of lfr. The first element is from *Anu-, "ancestor." For the second element -leif see above. This name is found in Landnmabk for lof feigsdttir in ch. 21; lof, the daughter of rsteinn raur ("the red") in ch. 37; lof orgrmsdttir in ch. 40; lof Inglfsdttir in ch. 52; lof, the daughter of Ragnar lobrkkr ("shaggy-breeches") in ch. 55; lof, the daughter of king Haraldr hrfagra ("fair-hair") in ch. 82; lof, the daughter of Bovarr Vkinga-Krason of Vors in ch. 99; and lof, the daughter of rr vaggagi ("squat-wiggle") in ch. 99. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 6, 342, 350; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Alv, Alv For the first element Al- see above. The second element -v comes from the Germanic *-wh, derived from Germanic *-whaz and related to the Gothic adjective weihs "holy" - thus the sense should be "priest". A runic example is found in the nominative case as alui. NR s.v. Alv, Al-, -v, -vr
Alvor For the first element Al- see above. The second element vor is the feminine form corresponding to the masculine second element -varr, from *-war "to be vigilant" (compare to the OW.Norse adjective varr "vigilant"), derived from Germanic *-waraz or *-warjaz "defend, protect" and related to the Old Norse verb verja, "defend". GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 351-352
Alrr For the first element Al- see above. The second element -rr is from OW.Norse *rr, possibly from Primitive Scandinavian *ri < *ri, "strength, power, force" and also appears in the mythology as the name of the goddess rr, daughter of the god Thrr and the goddess Sif. Runic examples occur as the nominative form (a)lrur and the accusative alrui. CV p. 747 s.v. rr, ra; NR s.v. Alrr, Al-, -rr
Amma A short form of names in Arn-, Am-, or from Old Swedish amma and OW.Norse amma, "grandmother". Found later in Old Swedish as a by-name and in OW.Norse as the name of a fictional character. A runic example occurs in the accusative case as a-mu. NR s.v. Amma
ma For the first element - see above. The second element is a weak side-form of -m, from Germanic *-m, which becomes OW.Norse -mr, "temprament; wrath; courage". A runic example occurs in the nominative case as omua. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. ma, -, -m, -mr
Arnbjorg The first element is Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, representing various alternate forms of the OW.Norse bird-names orn, ari "eagle". The name-element might also considered to be identical to OW.Norse arinn "hearth". The second element -bjorg or -borg is derived from Germanic *-berg or else the name is derived from the OW.Norse verb bjarga "to save, to help, to deliver out of need or danger". The second element form -borg, frequently found in Swedish and Danish names, may also come from a postulated form *-burg but may also be considered to reflect a sound development from -bjorg. Found in Old Swedish in several forms: Anborgh, Arnborgh, rnborgh, rinnborgh, OW.Norse Arnbiorg. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as arnburk and in the accusative case as arin:biaurk. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arnbjorg of Arnbjargarlk in ch. 24; Arnbjorg, whose mother was Vigds orsteinsdttir in ch. 39; Arnbjorg rardttir in ch. 64; and Arnbjorg Rormsdttir in chs. 86 and 95. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjorg; NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/r(in)nbirg/-borg, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -birg/-borg
Arnds For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arnds in auga ("the rich"), daughter of Steinlfr, in chs. 42 and 53; Arnds Styrbjarnardttir in ch. 60; Arnds Heinsdttur in ch. 63; and Arnds rkelsdttir in ch. 74. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds
Arneir For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -eir see above. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arneir, daughter of Jarl sbjorn skerjablesi ("skerry-blaze") in chs. 76 and 99. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 247 s.v. heir
Arnfasta For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -fasta represents a weak side-form of -fast/-fost, from the OW.Norse adjective fastr "firm, strong". This name is the feminine form of masculine Arnfasti. A runic example is found in the nominative case as arnfasta. NR s.v. Arnfasta, Arnfasti, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -fast/-fst
Arnfrr For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -frr or -frr comes from *friuR, "love, peace" or -frr from *friioR, related to Gotlandic frijion, "to love" with an original meaning of "beloved" and later meaning "fair." Found in Old Danish as Arnfrith, in Old Swedish as Arfridh, Arnfridh, rnfridh, rinnfridh, nfridh, rnfridh. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arnfrr Sleitu-Bjarnardttir in ch. 63. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Arn-/rnfrr, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -frr, Fra
Arngerr, Arngrr, Arinngrr, rngrr, rinngrr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. Old Swedish forms include Angrdh, Arngrdh, ringrdh. Runic forms occur in the nominative case as arker, rkir, erinker. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arngerr orbjarnardttir in chs. 42 and 52; Arngerr, sister of Ska of Skadal in ch. 65; and Arngerr sbrandsdttir in ch. 98. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerr; NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/r(in)ngrr, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -grr, -garr
Arngunnr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arngunnr Hmundardttir in ch. 85; and for Arngunnr, daughter of rsteinn drangakarl in ch. 91. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 344; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Arnkatla For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -katla is a feminine form of the masculine second element -ketill or -kell, from OW.Norse ketill, originally "kettle" but meaning also "helmet" or "chieftain with helmet." This name is found in Landnmabk for Arnkatla rardttir, sister of rr kottr ("cat") in ch. 38; and for Arnkatla, daughter of rsteinn vfill ("weevil") and rkatla in ch. 87. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
Arnlaug For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -laug comes from Germanic *-lauz-, identical to the Gothic verb liugan "give holy vows, enter into marriage". The name-element may then originally have the meaning, "one who is promised or dedicated (to)". Others interpret this element as possibly being related to Old Icelandic laug and Latin lavare, in an ancient sense of "bathing for religious purification". Found in Old Danish as Arlgh, in Old Swedish as rnlgh, and in OW.Norse as Arnlaug. Runic examples in the nominative case include a-lauk, erlyg. FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV; NR s.v. Arn-/rnlaug, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -laug
Arnleif For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -leif see above. This name is found in Landnmabk for Arnleif, daughter of rr gellir ("yeller, screamer") in chs. 34 and 64. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 350; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Arnra, Arnra For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -ra and -dra is identical to the Old Icelandic rr, the god of thunder. The name Arnra is found in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, for Arnra the daughter of Einarr of Laugarbrekka. This name also appears in Landnmabk for Arnra Laugarbrekku-Einarsdttir in ch. 28; Arnra, daughter of rr gellir ("yeller, screamer") in ch. 34; Arnra Ln-Einarsdttir and Arnra Gunnbjarnardttir in ch. 38; and Arnra, daughter of rgeirr inn i ("the raging") in ch. 65. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
Arnv For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples include the nominative case ari, ar[ni], erinui, erin..., irinui. NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/r(in)nv, Ar(in)n-/r(in)n-, -v, -vr
Arnrr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -rr see above. In Hrafnkels saga freysgoa there is an Arnrr who is a foreign-born bondservant. This name also appears in Landnmabk for Arnrr Arinbjarnardttir in ch. 22. The short form for names in -ra is ra. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV p. 747 s.v. rr, ra; NR s.v. -rr
sa A short form for names in s-, s- or s-, which are from *ansuR and related to Old Icelandic ss or ss, "a god." Found in the Anglo-Scandinavian form Asa. Occurs in Old Danish as Asa or Ose, and in Old Swedish Asa. Runic forms include nominative case aosa, asa, osa, the genitive case forms asu, osuahsu, asr, asu. The name sa appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the mother of the title character. This name also appears in Landnmabk in ch. 26 for sa Ingjaldsdttir, sister to Grmr Ingjaldsson and granddaughter to Hrald; and for sa, mother of runnr in ch. 92. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 18, 342; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss; NR s.v. sa, s-/s-
sbjorg, sborg For the first element s- see above. For the second element -bjorg, -borg see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 46. 66 s.v. ss, bjorg
sbo?, sm For the first element s- see above. The second element is uncertain. Runic inscriptions have the accusative case forms asbo, os-u A feminine second element -bo (from *-bu) or -bo (from *-ba) are not found in the Nordic area. The second element may instead be -m, from Germanic *-m, which becomes OW.Norse -mr, "temprament; wrath; courage". An Old Danish woman's name of Asmoth suggests that an Old Norse form of sm is likely. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. sbo, sm, s-/s-, -m, -mr
sds For the first element s- see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for sds Brardttir in ch. 29; and sds rgrmsdttir in ch. 48. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 46, 100 s.v. ss, ds
sfrr For the first element s- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Runic examples include the nominative case forms asfri, osfrir. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. sfrr, strr/strr, s-/s-, -frr, Fra
sgauta This name is uncertain, as it appears in runic form as the nominative case askata, although this example may instead represent the feminine name skatla. If the inscription is sgauta, then it is a feminine form of masculine sgautr. For the first element s- see above. The second element -gauta is from OW.Norse gautr, pl. gautar "inhabitant of Gotland, Gotlander". NR s.v. sgauta, sgautr, s-/s-, -gautr
sgera, sgerr For the first element s- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. This is a west Scandinavian name, but there are a couple of instances in Swedish runic inscriptions of sgerr. Appears in Old Danish as Esgerth. Runic examples include the nominative forms asker, [askiar], askir, oskir; the genitive form askiar and the accusative forms eskeri, oskari. sgerr Bjarnardttir appears in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu and in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, where she is mentioned as being wife to Egill Skallagrmsson and mother of rsteinn Egilsson. This name also appears in Landnmabk for sgerr, wife of feigr in ch. 21 and 89; sgerr rardttir in ch. 64; and sgerr, daughter of Askr inn mlgi in ch. 89. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian derived place-name Asgarthcroft, c. 1523. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 24, 342, 349; CV pp. 46, 197 s.v. ss, Gerr; NR s.v. sgrr, s-/s-, -grr
sgunnr For the first element s- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Appears in Old Danish as Asgun and in Old Swedish as Asgun. A runic form, askun appears in the nominative case. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. sgunnr, s/s-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
sheir, shir For the first element s- or s- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form esii. NR s.v. shir, s-/s-, -hir
shildr For the first element s- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for shildr, wife of lfur tvennumbrni ("double-brows") in ch. 97. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 46, 261 s.v. ss, hildr
skatla For the first element s- see above. For the second element -katla see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms askala, askata, askatla, oskatla. NR s.v. skatla, s-/s-, -k(ti)ll, Ktill
slaug For the first element s- see above. For the second element -laug see above. The name slaug appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the grandmother of the title character. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 46, 374 s.v. ss, laug def. IV
sleif For the first element s- see above. For the second element -leif see above. Appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as the name of the wife of lafr Hrlfsson, the mother of Sveinn. This name also appears in Landnmabk for sleif rgilsdttir in ch. 94. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
smo, sb? For the first element s- see above. The second element is uncertain. Runic inscriptions have the accusative case forms asbo, os-u A feminine second element -bo (from *-bu) or -bo (from *-ba) are not found in the Nordic area. The second element may instead be -m, from Germanic *-m, which becomes OW.Norse -mr, "temprament; wrath; courage". An Old Danish woman's name of Asmoth suggests that an Old Norse form of sm is likely. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. sbo, sm, s-/s-, -m, -mr
sn For the first element s- see above. The second element -n is from the the OW.Norse adjective nr "new". This name appears in Landnmabk for sn, Vga-Sturludttir in chs. 44 and 48; sn Vestarsdttir in ch. 90; and sn Flosadttir in ch. 94. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss; NR s.v. -n
sta sta is the short form for the name strr, and is also found as a personal name. This name appears in Landnmabk for sta, the daughter of Gubrandr kla ("knob") and mother of king lfr in ch. 53; sta, whose mother was lfhildr and whose som was king lfr inn helgi ("the holy", St. lafr) in ch. 55. GB pp. 8; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss
strr The first element st- here is a form of Old Icelandic ss, "god, one of the sir". In proper names, the first element becomes st- before the liquid r. The second element is from -frr, see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Estrith and in Old Swedish as Astridh (this example is from Bohusln) and stridh, OW.Norse strr. Runic examples oinclude the nominative case forms astri, astrir, estri, istryr, ostri, ostrir; genitive case estriaR; and accusative case asrii, osrii. This name appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as strr of Breidafjord, wife of Brr Hoskuldsson. This name also appears in Landnmabk for strr slkidrengr ("slender as a youth"), the daughter of Bragi the skld in ch. 22; strr Hrlfsdttir in ch. 32; strr Grmsdttir in ch. 39; strr, the wife of Arnmr Heinsson in ch. 55; strr, the daughter of rvaldr holbarki ("braggart") in ch. 77; and strr manvitsbrekka ("hill of man's wit", i.e., paragon of wisdom), daughter of Mlfr in ch. 78 and 85. Short forms of strr include Old Danish Etta and in Old Swedish tta. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss; NR s.v. sfrr, strr/strr, s-/s-, -frr, Fra
sv, sv For the first element s- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. A runic example found in nominative form is -sui. NR s.v. sv, s-/s-, -v, -vr
svor For the first element s- see above. The second element -vor represents a feminine name element from *-war, derived from Germanic *-waraz or *-warjaz, related to Germanic *warn "to be vigilant" (compare with the OW.Norse adjective varr "vigilant") or Germanic *warjan "defend, protect." Appears in Old Danish as Aswar. Runic forms include the nominative case [osuar] and accusative case osuar. This name appears in Landnmabk for svor, daughter of rir Graut-Atlason in ch. 75; svor Brynjlfsdttir in ch. 77; svor, daughter of Oddbjorn askasmir ("ship-wrignt") in ch. 90; and svor Vestarsdttir, the mother of Helgi inn svarti ("the black") in ch. 90. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 351-352; CV pp. 46 s.v. ss; NR s.v. svor, s-/s-, -vor; NR s.v. -vor
slfR For the first element s- see above. The second element -lfR is a feminine name element from *-albi-, related to masculine -alfR, from OW.Norse alfr m. "elf, a type of subterranean being". A runic example found in the accusative case is aselfi. NR s.v. slfR, s-/s-, -lfR
Aua A diminuitive form of names in Au-. A single instance of this name appears as the name of a fictional character in West Scandinavia, but a few instances are found in Swedish runic inscriptions in the nominative form aua, the genitive form auuR and the accusative form uu. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian form Auda, c. 1245. FJ pp. 37-38; NR s.v. Aua, Au-
AulfR The first element Au- is occasionally written Od- and is of uncertain origin, but may be from Old Icelandic aur, "wealth," though it is also suggested that it may be related to the poetical term aur, "fate, destiny". For the second element -lfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as dhlf. A runic example in the accusative case appears as auelfi. NR s.v. AulfR, Au-, -lfR
Aubjorg For the first element Au- see above. For the second element -bjorg see above. A short form of names in Au- is Aua. GB pp. 7; CV pp. 32, 66 s.v. aur, bjorg
Aufrr For the first element Au- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Appears in runic inscriptions as the possible nominarive form [aufri...] and the genitive case aufriaR. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Aufrr, Au-, -frr, Fra
Augerr For the first element Au- see above. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. Appears in Old Danish as thgerth and in Old Swedish as dhgrdh. Runic forms include the nominative case auker, [auker], ukiar and the accusative case aukeri. NR s.v. Augrr, Au-, -grr
Augur For the first element Au- see above. For the second element -gur see -gunnr above. A runic example is found in the nominative form a-kur. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Augur, Au-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Auhelga For the first element Au- see above. The second element -helga is related to the Old Icelandic hlga, "holy, hallowed, sanctified". A short form of names in Au- is Aua. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 32, 254-255 s.v. aur, Helgi, helga
Auhildr For the first element Au- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A single instance of this name is found in the Orkneys in the early 1100's. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Othild (1166-1176), Audhild (1208), Authild (1219). A short form of names in Au- is Aua. FJ pp. 39, 342, 349; CV pp. 32, 261 s.v. aur, hildr
Aur, Aua Of uncertain origin, but may be from *Aui- and Old Icelandic aur, "wealth, riches, luck," though it is also suggested that it may be related to the poetical term aur, "fate, destiny." Occurs in the runic nominative form ayr. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Aur is the sister of rkel hvelpr ("whelp") and Kntr of Saurby, and is married to rr Ingunnarson. Aur in djpga ("the deep-minded"), daughter of Ketill flatnefr ("flat-nose") and one of the original settlers of Iceland, is perhaps the best known woman with this name, and she appears in several sources, including Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, as well as being mentioned in many places in Landnmabk. A short form of names in Au- is Aua. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 32, 66 s.v. aur; NR s.v. yr
Auga The feminine or masculine name Auga is related to the OW.Norse man's by-name Auga and with OW.Norse auga "eye". A runic inscription in the nominative case gives auka. NR s.v. Auga
Amiul Celtic name. A runic example is found in the accusative case as amiu.... NR s.v. Amiul
 
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Name Notes Source
Baugei, Baugeir The first element Baug- is identical to Old Icelandic baugr, a ring or armlet, particularly the sacred temple ring upon which oaths were made. The compound baugeir is specifically used for this oath. However, in this name the second element is probably actually from -heir see above. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 53-54, 117, 247 s.v. baugr, baugeir, eir, heir
Begga   GB pp. 8
Bera From the root ber, "bear" found also in berserkr. The name Bera is found in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, for Bera Yngvarsdttir, mother of Egill Skallagrmsson; she is also mentioned in Landnmabk ch. 25. Landnmabk ch. 100 states that Egill Skallagrmsson also had a daughter named Bera. A diminuitive form of this name is Birla. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 58 s.v. bera
Bergds The first element Berg- is identical to the Norwegian dialect term berg, "protection, help." For the second element -ds see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Bergds Geirsdttir, ch. 20; and for Bergds, the wife of Grmr Ingjaldsson in ch. 26. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds
Berghildr For the first element Berg- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Bergljt For the first element Berg- see above. The second element -ljt is thought to derive from Old Icelandic *ljtr, "giving light" but may instead be related to Old Icelandic ljtr, "ugly". This name appears in Landnmabk for Bergljt, daughter of Jarl rir egjandi ("the silent") in ch. 82. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350
Bergra For the first element Berg- see above. For the second element -ra see above. This name appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as Bergra, daughter of lfr Hoskuldsson and wife of rhall goa ("priest"). This name also appears in Landnmabk for Bergra, daughter of Kolgrmr inn gamli ("the old") in ch. 14; and for Bergra Hrtssdttir in ch. 39. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
Berkhildr For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the daughter of King Hertryggyr. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Birla Diminuitive form with the -l- second element of the OW.Norse feminine name Bera. Appears in a runic incription in the nominative case as birla. NR s.v. Birla
Birna May be identical with the Old Icelandic birna, "she-bear". GB pp. 8; CV pp. 63 s.v. birna
Bjargey The first element Bjarg- may derive from Old Icelandic bjarga, "to save, to help", or it may instead be related to Old Icelandic bjarg, "rocks, precipices". The second element -ey or -y is of uncertain origin but may derive either from a feminine form of Primitive Scandinavian auja "happiness, luck, (luck) giver" or may be related to closely related to Primitive Scandinavian *awi "island", Old Icelandic ey, "island." The word ey is also used as a poetic circumlocution for "woman", and in poetical diction ey is personified as a goddess, the sea being her girdle, the glaciers her head-gear. This name appears in Landnmabk for Bjargey Valbrandsdttir, wife of Hvarr halti ("the lame") in ch. 50. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 64-65, 134 s.v. bjarg, bjarga, ey; NR s.v. -y
Bjollok This name appears in Landnmabk for Bjollok, wife of slkr aurgoi in ch. 85. GB pp. 8
Bjorg See -bjorg above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Bjorg, the daughter of Eyvindr austmann ("the easterner") in ch. 43; and Bjorg slfsdttir in ch. 86. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjorg
Bon The first element Bo- or Bov- is identical to OW.Norse bo (genitive form bovar), derived from Germanic *baw "battle". For the second element -n see above. A runic example is found in the genitive case as (b)(y)()nuiaR. NR s.v. Bon, Bo(v)-, -n
Bovildr For the first element Bo- or Bov- see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Bolla Short form of the OW.Norse names Bovildr, Bthildr, Borghildr. Found in a runic inscription in the accusative case as bulu. NR s.v. Bolla
Borga Short form of feminine names in Borg- or -borg. The first element Borg- is an alternate form of Berg- and thus derived from the OW.Norse verb bjarga "to save, to help." The first element Borg- is sometimes assumed to be derived from OW.Norse borg "castle, fortified place". Runic forms appear in the nominative case as borha, burka. NR s.v. Borga, Borg-, -borg
Borghildr For the first element Borg- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 66, 261 s.v. bjorg, hildr
Borgunna For the first element Borg- see above. The second element -gunna is a weak side-form of -unnr/-ur, which is itself a Primitive Scandinavian -i-stem formation from the OW.Norse verb unna (O.Engl. unnan, OH.Germ. (gi)unnan) "to love". This name-element is sometimes instead thought to derive from OW.Norse unnr, from *uni- "to wave, billow, roll, undulate". This name appears in runic form in the nominative case as burkuna. NR s.v. Borgunna, Borg-, -unnr/-ur
Bt Related to Old Icelandic bt, "fee, wergeld, compensation, remedy, improvement". Bt appears in ch. 99 of Landnmabk as the ambtt or servant of Ketilbjorn. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342-343
Btey For the first element Bt- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342-343
Btfrr For the first element Bt- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Runic forms include the nominative case bofrir and accusative case butriu. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Btfrr, Bt-, -frr, Fra
Btheir, Bthir For the first element Bt- see above. The second element -heir or -hir is from Primitive Scandinavian *-haii- "brilliance, beauty", related to the OW.Norse adjective heir "light, clear, bright". Found in Old Swedish as Botheidh (example from Gotland). A runic example in the nominative case includes [botair]. NR s.v. Bthir, Bt-, -hir
Bthildr, Bthilda For the first element Bt- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Both forms are fairly frequent in Norway after 1300. rare in Iceland, though found in Swedish and common in Danish. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Botild (c. 1152-1200), Botilda (c. 1185-1207), Botilde (c. 1170-1249). A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 61, 342-343, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Btv, Btv For the first element Bt- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Swedish as Botvi (this example from Gotland). A runic example exists in the nominative case as botui. NR s.v. Btv, Bt-, -v, -vr
Brgia Celtic, Brigid, Brigit GB pp. 8
Bryngerr The first element Bryn- (before a vowel Brynj-) is identical with Old Icelandic brynja, "corselet, mail-coat, byrnie." For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Bryngerr, mother of Frileifr, and her great-granddaughter Bryngerr jarsdttir in ch. 65. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 85, 197 s.v. brynja, Gerr
Brynhildr For the first element Bryn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name probably came to Scandinavia with the story of the valkyrie Brunhild. The name is fairly common in Norway from the late 1100's onwards but less common in Iceland. A couple of instances are found in Denmark, in the Latinized form Brunildis. The name Brynhildr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of Budli. Also appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the name of the mother of Bosi. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Brunildesford (1360) and Brunildeberge (1220-1250). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 67, 343, 349; CV pp. 85, 261 s.v. brynja, hildr
Busla The name Busla appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the name of the foster-mother of Bosi.  

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Name Notes Source
Dageir The first element Dag- is identical to Old Icelandic dagr, "day". For the second element -eir see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 94-95, 247 s.v. dagr, heir
Dagmr For the first element Dag- see above. The second element -mr may possibly be related to Old Icelandic mr, "maiden, girl", or to Old Icelandic mrr, "famous". The name Dagmr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the wife of King rndr. FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 94-95, 443 s.v. dagr, mr, mrr
Dagn For the first element Dag- see above. For the second element -n see above. The name Dagn appears in the early 14th century legendary saga rsteins ttr bjarmagns as the mother of the title character. CV pp. 94-95 s.v. dagr; NR s.v. -n
Dagrn For the first element Dag- see above. For the second element -rn see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Dagrn, the mother of Bersi, in ch. 90. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 94-95, 504 s.v. dagr, rn; NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
Dalla This name appears in Landnmabk for Dalla, sister of rgeirr Galtason and wife of rvaldr Hjaltason, in ch. 74. GB pp. 9
Ds From OW.Norse ds "goddess, female god". A runic example in the accusative case appears as tisi. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds; NR s.v. Ds, -ds
Dsa See Ds above. Found in Old Swedish as Disa. A runic example is found in the nominative case as tisa. Dsa is a short-form for names in Ds- or -ds. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds; NR s.v. Ds, -ds
DslfR For the first element Ds- see Ds above. For the second element -lfR see above. Runic instances include the nominative case tiselfr and tisilfR. NR s.v. DslfR, Ds, Ds-, -lfR
Dmhildr The first element Dm- may be related to Old Icelandic dmr, "judgement, legal sentence, fate, doom", which is also found in a number of legal terms in Old Norse. For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 101, 261 s.v. dmr, hildr
Dra Dra is a short form of names with the -dra second element, such as Halldra. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Dta Found in Old Danish and Old Swedish as Dota; compare with the Old Swedish man's by-name Dota, OW.Norse Dtta, and the Old Danish man's by-name Dotta. Of uncertain etymology. Found in the nominative case in a runic inscription as -ota. NR s.v. Dta
Dtta A Danish name, probably a form of dttir, "daughter". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 102 s.v. Dtta
DttiR Found in Old Danish as Dotir and in Old Swedish as Dottir. From OW.Norse dttir "daughter". Found in runic inscriptions in the nominative case as tutiR and tu-iR. NR s.v. DttiR
Drfa May be related to the Old Icelandic drf, meaning "driven snow". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 106 s.v. drf
Droplaug For the second element -laug see above. The name Droplaug appears in Vpnfiringa saga as the mother of the boys who are newphews to Hallkatla. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV
Drtt May be identical to Old Icelandic drtt, "household, a people, the king's warband". Found in Ynglingasaga ch. 20. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 107 s.v. drtt
Drfinna The first element Dr- may be from Old Icelandic dr, "deer", or else from Old Icelandic drr, 'dear, precious". The second element -finna is the feminine of Old Icelandic finnr, which means "Saami, Laplander." The word is often mistranslated as "a person from Finland, a Finn", and often is used to mean "sorcerer, magician, practicioner of seir, since the Saami were believed to be mighty magicians. This name appears in Landnmabk for Drfinna, mother of rsteinm smir Skeggjason ("the smith") in ch. 67. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 111-112, 154 s.v. dr, drr, Finnar
Drhildr For the first element Dr- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 111-112, 261 s.v. dr, drr, hildr
 
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Name Notes Source
Edda The name Edda is found in Rgsula in the Poetic Edda. This name also appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the name of the daughter of King Hrekr. CV pp. 114 s.v. edda
Ela May be from ela-, related to German edel- and Danish del-, "noble". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 114, 115 s.v. eal-, ela-
Ena Celtic GB pp. 9
En For the second element -n see above. The name En appears in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the daughter of King Hkon, and in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of King Hrekr. GB pp. 9; NR s.v. -n
Eilf This name is the feminine form of the man's name Eilfr/ilfR. The first element Ei-, i- has several proposed origins: the first is from Primitive Scandinavian *aiwa "always", the second is from Primitive Scandinavian *aina- "one, alone" and the third explanation sees this first element as originating as a delabialized form of the first element Ey-, y-. The sufix is from Primitive Scandinavian *-lbaR and OW.Norse lf "life" and is related to -lifR/-lafR. NR s.v. ilf
Eilna, Elna Christian, Helen. This name appears in Landnmabk for Elna, daughter of king Burislv, in ch. 63. GB pp. 9
Eirn The first element Eir- may be related to Old Icelandic eir, "peace, clemency". For the second element -n see above. There was also a goddess named Eir, one of Frigga's handmaidens. This name appears in Landnmabk for Eirn irandadttr in ch. 42 GB pp. 9; CV pp. 123 s.v. eir; NR s.v. -n
Ellisif Ellisif is the Nordicized version of the Russian name Elisaveta, the daughter of Jaroslav who married Norwegian king Haraldr hardrada. GB pp. 9; Blndal pp. 55
Embla, Emla This is a mythological name, found in Volusp 17, where the creation of man is explained by the gods finding two trees, an askr (ash) and embla and from then created the first man and woman, who were then called Askr and Embla. The exact meaning of embla is unknown, though scholars have noted its similarities to almr, "elm", but the word also is used by Egil Skallagrimsson in the compound emblu-askr, which suggests that it may be related to "ash tree" instead. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 127 s.v. Embla
Emma   GB pp. 9
Engilborg, Ingilborg Christian. The first element Engil- is identical to Old Icelandic engill "angel", a loan-word from Latin angelus. For the second element -borg see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 66, 123-130 s.v. bjorg, engill
Erna Identical to the Old Icelandic adjective ern, "brisk, vigorous". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 133 s.v. ern
Esja This name may possibly be related to Old Norse esja, a kind of clay. There is a mountain in Iceland named Esja. Landnmabk lists the name of a farm as Esju-berg, "Clay Berg". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 134 s.v. esja
Evja   GB pp. 9
Eybjorg The first element Ey- (or before a vowel, Eyj-) is of uncertain origin but may derive from *auja, "fortune, gift." The Cleasby-Vigfusson dictionary states that while the second element -ey may be related to the word for island, from Primitive Scandinavian *awi, when it appears as the first element Ey- or Eyj- then the word comes from a different root. For the second element -bjorg, -borg see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form ayburg. NR s.v. yborg, y-, -birg/-borg
Eyds For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -ds see above. Found in Old Swedish as dis and in OW.Norse as Eyds. Occurs in the runic accusative forms (a)utisi, aytisi. This name appears in Landnmabk for Eyds, wife of rsteinn goi ("chieftain"), in ch. 73. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 134 s.v. ds, ey; NR s.v. yds, y-, -ds
Eyfrr For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -frr see above. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey; NR s.v. Fra
Eyfura For the first element Ey- see above. The second element -fura may be related to the Old Icelandic word fura, "fir-tree". The name Eyfura appears in the legendary saga Orvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Angantyr. CV pp. 134, 178 s.v. ey, fura
Eyildr For the first element Ey- see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. FJ pp. 348, 349; CV pp. 134, 261 s.v. ey, hildr
Eyja See Ey- above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Eyja Ingjaldsdttir in ch. 46. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey
Eylaug For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 134, 374 s.v. ey, laug def. IV
Eyvor For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -vor see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 351-352; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey; NR s.v. -vor
Eyra For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -ra see . FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 134, 743 s.v. ey, rr
 
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Name Notes Source
Falgerr For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 349; CV p. 197 s.v. Gerr
Fasta Short form of feminine names in Fast-, -fast/-fost. May appear in a runic inscription in the nominative case as [fasta]. NR s.v. Fasta, Fast-, -fast/-fost
Fastgerr The first element Fast- is related to Old Icelandic fastr, "firm, fast". For the second element -gerr see above. Runic forms in the nominative case include faskr and fstkir. NR s.v. Fastgrr, Fast-, -grr
Fastheir For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative form faster and the accusative form [fasti]i. NR s.v. Fasthir, Fast-, -hir
Fastn For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -n see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Fastn Brynjlfsdttir in ch. 76. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 145 s.v. fastr; NR s.v. -n
Fastrr For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Possibly found in Old Swedish as Fastridh. A runic inscription has the nominative form fatri. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Fastrr, Fast-, -frr, Fra
Fastv, Fastv For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as fastui, [fastui] and in the accusative case as fastui, (f)astuiu. NR s.v. Fastv, Fast-, -v, -vr
Finna See -finna above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Finna Skaftadttir, wife of Refr inn mikli ("the great") in ch. 27; Finna Hrtsdttir in ch. 39; and Finna ormardttir in ch. 98. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 154 s.v. finnr
Fjolm, Fiolm Compare to the OW.Norse name of a masculine fictional character, Fjolmr; also compare with the Continental Germanic feminine names Filomuot, Felemoda, and the masculine name Filimuth. The OW.Norse name may be interpreted as "courageous " (from fjol- "full-, exceedingly-" and mr "emotional; courageous; wrathful"). In Runic Swedish this name may be understood as a variation of names formed with a second element in -m or -mr and a personal name element Fiol-, Fjol- corresponding to Continental Germanic names in Filu- (< Germanic *felu- "full-, exceedingly-"). A runic example is found in the accusative case as fiul:mu. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. Fiolm(r), -m
Fjorleif The first element Fjor- may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic fjor, "life, vitality". For the second element -leif see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Fjorleif Eyvindardttir in ch. 72-73. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 154 s.v. fjor; FJ pp. 158; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Fjotra The name Fjotra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family. The name may be related to Old Icelandic fjoturr, "fetter, shackle". All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjotra, Hjotra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV pp. 154 s.v. fjotra, fjoturr
Folka Short form of feminine names in Folk-. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as fulku. NR s.v. Folka, Folk-
Folkv, Folkv The first element Folk- is from OW.Norse folk "group of people, a group of warriors." For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as fulkui and fulukui. A short form of feminine names in Folk- is Folka. NR s.v. Folkv, Folk-, -v
Frakokk This name appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as the name of the wife of Ljtr the Renegade of Sutherland. Frakkok was the daughter of a farmer living in the Orkneys, one Moddan. The name may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic frakka a loan word from Old English franca, a type of spear, or to the man's name Frakki. CV pp. 169 s.v. frakka, Frakki
Freyds, Fryds The first element Frey- or Fry- derives from Primitive Scandinavian *fraujaR "lord". As with other words in the Scandinavian languages this word became a god's name (OW.Norse Freyr; Old Danish, Old Swedish Fr), the name first element Frey- or Fry- means in part "lord", but also signifies the god. The OW.Norse form of this name is Freyds. Found in a runic inscription in the nominative form frautis. The name Freyds is found in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, and in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395) for the daughter of Eirkr raur. Freyds was memorable, but not likable. She stands out historically as the first European ax-murderess in the New World. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. ds; NR s.v. Fryds, Fry-, -ds
Freygerr For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Frgerth and in OW.Norse as Freygerr. Runic forms include the nominative case frukar and the genitive case fraikiraR. This name appears in Landnmabk for Freygerr Hrafnsdttir in ch. 38. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerr; NR s.v. Frygrr, Fry-, -grr
Freygunnr For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Runic examples include nominative case fraykun and frykur. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Frygunnr/-gur, Fry-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Freylaug For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as fraylaug. NR s.v. Frylaug, Fry-, -laug
Fra A short form of names in Fr-, -frr. The first element Fri- comes from OW.Norse frir (< Primitive Scandinavian *friuR) "love, peace", which as a name-element may mean "protection, defense". Found in Old Danish as Fritha and in Old Swedish as Fridha, with the OW.Norse form being Fra. May be found in a runic inscription in the nominative case as ...[e]a and occurs in the accusative case as friu. Cleasby-Vigfusson notes that names in Fri- were only rarely used in the Viking Age: possibly they became more popular with the advent of Christianity. FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 173 s.v. frr; NR s.v. Fra, -frr
FrilfR For the first element Fri- see above. For the second element -lfR see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as [fr(in)elfr] and in the accusative case as [frielfi]. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. FrilfR, Fri-, -lfR, Fra
Frigerr For the first element Fri- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Frigerr Illugadttir in ch. 34; Frigerr, daughter of Kjarvalr, an Irish king, in ch. 64. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerr; NR s.v. Fra
Frosthildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation. The first element Frost- is related to Old Icelandic frost, "frost". For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Frostildehau (c. 1175). FJ pp. 87, 343, 349; CV pp. 174-175, 261 s.v. frost, hildr
 
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Name Notes Source
Gauthildr The byname gautr was originally a Swedish name element, meaning "Goth, man from Gautland, Gotlander." The Cleasby-Vigfusson dictionary notes that the masculine name Gautr is a poetical name for inn, and suggests that it may mean "father". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 10; FJ pp. 348-349; CV pp. 193, 261 s.v. Gautr, hildr
Geira, GiRa The feminine form of the name element Geir-, which is identical to the Old Icelandic geirr, "spear." A short form of feminine names in GiR-. Occurs in the runic nominative forms [kaira] and kera. Occurs in Old Danish as Gera and in OW.Norse as Geira. Found in Landnmabk. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr, Geira; NR s.v. GiRa, GiR-
Geirbjorg For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Geirbjorg Blkadttir in ch. 19, 25, 53. A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 66, 196 s.v. bjorg, geirr
Geirds For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -ds see above. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 196 s.v. ds, geirr
Geirhildr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Possibly found in Old Danish as Gerhild. Occurs in OW.Norse as Geirhildr. Occurs in the runic nominative form gaiRilt(r). This name appears in Landnmabk for Geirhildr Flkadttir in ch. 2; Geirhildr fjolkunnig kona (witch) in ch. 68; and another Geirhildr in ch. 69. A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 196, 261 s.v. geirr, hildr; NR s.v. GiRhildr, GiR-, -hildr
Geirlaug For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Danish as Gerlgh and in OW.Norse as Geirlaug. Runic examples include nominative case gaiRlauk and accusative case kaiR[l]a[uk]. This name appears in Landnmabk for Geirlaug rmardttir in ch. 20. A short form for Geirlaug is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 196, 374 s.v. geirr, laug def. IV; NR s.v. GiRlaug, GiR-, -laug
Geirlo For the first element Geir- see above. The second element -lo is identical to Old Icelandic lo, "bidding, invitation". A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 196, 404 s.v. geirr, lo
Geirn For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -n see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Geirn, mother of Skld-Hrafn in ch. 95. A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr; NR s.v. -n
Geirrr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Occurs in OW.Norse as Geirrr. A runic nominative form is kairkiRi-r. This name appears in Landnmabk for Geirrr Bgiftsdttir in ch. 30; Geirrr, the sister of Geirror, who married Bjorn Bolverkson blindingatrja ("peg-pole") in ch. 34; Geirrr, daughter of rlfr bgiftr ("limp-leg"); and Geirrr, whose mother was rkatla feigsdttir, in ch. 40. A short form of feminine names in GiR- is Geira. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 350; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr; NR s.v. GiRfrr, GiR-, -frr, Fra
Geirunnr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -ur or -unnr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form kaiR[uni]. NR s.v. GiRunnr, GiR-, -unnr/-ur
Geirv For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms kairui, [kai]Rui and possibly the accusative form (a)iRku. NR s.v. GiRv, GiR-, -v, -vr
Gerr The name Gerr is from Primitive Scandinavian *garior, or may be related to Old Icelandic geristn, "garden". May be a feminine form of the masculine name Garr. It is found as the name of a goddess or giantess with whom the god Freyr falls in love in the Poetic Edda, but is also found as a human name in 10th century Iceland, where it is recorded in Landnmabk for Gerr, daughter of Kjallakr inn gamli ("the old") in ch. 27 and 32; Gerr Bovarsdttir in ch. 55; and Gerr lfsdttir in ch. 97. Occurs only in place-names from Norway and Denmark. Also see the second element -gerr above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 100, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerr
Gilla Found as Old Swedish Gilla. This name is a short form of the woman's name Gillaug. A runic example has the nominative form kila. NR s.v. Gilla, Gillaug
Gillaug Found in Old Swedish as Gillgh. The origin of the first element is uncertain: it may perhaps represent an assimilated form of the woman's name Ginnlaug, or it also may have developed from the woman's name GiRlaug. Continental Germanic names in Gil- are assumed to be derived from Gsl-, but such assimilation seems to first appear late in Scandinavia. It is also possible that names in Gil(l)- are borrowings of Celtic name-elements; compare with OW.Norse Gilli, Gillikristr. For the second element -laug see above. There are a number of runic occurrances, including nominative case gilok, giluk, kilauh, kilauk, (k)ilauk, [kilaum], kilnuk, [kilok], kiluk and genitive case kilaua and kilauhaR. NR s.v. Gillaug, -laug
Ginna The first element Ginn- is of uncertain etymology. It may derive from a Continental Germanic name, perhaps relted to the OW.Norse verb ginna "to deceive, to enchant"; compare with the OW.Norse mythological character Ginnarr. Found in Old Swedish Ginna. Short form of the woman's name Ginnlaug. There is one runic example in the nominative case, kina. NR s.v. Ginna, Ginnlaug
Ginnlaug For the first element Ginn- see above. A short form of this name isGinna. Runic examples include the nominative forms |kinlauh, |kinla-h, kinluk, the genitive forms kinlauhaR, kinlau-aR and the accusative form ki---uku. NR s.v. Ginnlaug, Ginn-, -laug
Gsla Found in Old Danish as Gisla. This name is either a short form of Gslaug or the feminine equivalent to the man's name Gsli. A runic inscription has the nominative form kisla. NR s.v. Gsla, Gslaug, Gsli
Gslaug The first element Gsl- may be related to the Langobard word gsil "arrow-shaft" and also to OW.Norse geisl "staff", geisli "sun-beam"; thus "a shaft typical of a weapon or a part of a weapon". The name may also be linked to OW.Norse gsl "hostage". For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gislgh and in OW.Norse as Gslaug. Runic examples include the nominative forms kislauh, kisl(a)uig, kislauk, [kislauk], [k-sluk], [-]islauh. NR s.v. Gslaug, Gsl-, -laug
Gjaflaug The first element Gjaf-, Giaf- or Gef- is derived from Germanic *Geba-, compare with the OW.Norse verb gefa "to give" and OW.Norse gjof "gift", related to the stem in gjafari and gjafmildr. For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as kiafluk. Appears as the name of two women in Laxdla saga (c. 1245), Gjaflaug Arnbjornardttir, wife of rleikr Hoskuldsson, and Gjaflaug Kjallaksdttir, wife of Bjorn inn austrni ("the easterner"). Gjaflaug Kjallaksdttir is also mentioned in Landnmabk in ch. 32 and 40. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 202, 374 s.v. gjof, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Giaflaug, Gef-/Giaf-, -laug
Gjaflo For the first element Gjaf- see above. For the second element -lo see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 202, 404 s.v. gjof, lo
Greilo For the second element -lo see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 404 s.v. lo
Grlo, Grlaa For the second element -lo see above. In Eirks saga raua Grlaa appears as the wife of Earl rsteinn hausakljfr ("skull-splitter"). This name appears in Landnmabk for Grlo, whose mother was Gra rsteinsdttir, in ch. 36; and for Grlo, daughter of Jarl Bjartmar in ch. 47. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 404 s.v. lo
Grma The first element Grm- is related to Old Icelandic grma, "mask", and may refer to a helm which masks the face, also Grmr was one of the names of the god inn. This name appears in Landnmabk for Grma Hallkelsdttir in ch. 22 and ch. 28. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Grma is the name of a Hebridean witch who practices deadly magic against rr Ingunnarson and Kari Hrtsson, and is eventually put to death for her crimes by lfr pi ("peacock"). GB pp. 9; CV pp. 216 s.v. grma
Grmhildr For the first element Grm- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. The name Grmhildr appears in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395), as the wife of rsteinn of Lysufjord. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 216, 261 s.v. grma, hildr
Gra Found in Old Danish as Gro, in Old Swedish as Groa, and in OW.Norse as Gra. This name appears in the Poetic Edda as the name of the mother of the giant Orvandil (the constellation Orion), and it is also found as a human name. May be related to Swedish groda or Norse gro, "toad, paddock", or may perhaps be related to OW.Norse gra, "to grow, to be healed of wounds". Runic examples include nominative case krua and kRrua. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gra rsteinsdttir and Gra the daughter of lfr feilan ("wolf-cub") in ch. 36; Gra Dala-Kollsdttir in ch. 39; Gra rlfsdttur in ch. 47; Gra Herfinnsdttir in ch. 63; Gra, wife of Flki in ch. 65; Gra in snarskyggna ("the swift-eyed") and Gra rvarsdttir in ch. 65; Gra Hafrsdttir in ch. 67; Gra, the daughter of rr illugi ("evil-mind") in ch. 83 and 84; and Gra Vestarsdttir in ch. 85. This name also appears for three characters in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): Gra Geirmundardttir, who drowned with her father Geirmundr gnr ("the noisy"); Gra Dala-Kollsdttir; and Gra, daughter of rsteinn raur ("the red") and an ancestress of the Norse Earls of Orkney, who also appears in Eirks saga raua. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 216-217 s.v. gra, Gra; NR s.v. Gra
Gudda Gudda is a short form for Gurn. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
GulfR The first element Gu- and its side-form Go- are derived from Germanic *gua "god, god-like being" and are related to Old Icelandic gu, go, "god, the gods." The oldest form of this first element lies in the root go, and Cleasby-Vigfusson mentions that even in late Christian poetry words in gu- were made to rhyme with o, suggesting that the pronunciation should still be as if the first element were go-. In Iceland the pronunciation underwent further change, so that the g in Gu- is pronounced as gw in Christian names. For the second element -lfR see above. A runic example is found in the accusative case as [kye=lfi]. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. CV pp. 207-208 s.v. go; NR s.v. GulfR, Gu-, -lfR
Gubjorg For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gubjorgr, the mother of Gubrandr kla ("knob, hunchback") in ch. 53. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 207-208 s.v. bjorg, go; NR s.v. Gu-
Gufinna For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -finna see above. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. 154, 207-208 s.v. finnr, go
Gufrr For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Gurr. Runic examples include nominative case [kifri], kofri, [kufri]?, kufri, [u(u)friR] and dative case kufrii. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Gufrr, Gu-, -frr, Fra
Gulaug For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gudhlgh and in OW.Norse as Gulaug. Compare also with the woman's name Gullaug. Runic examples include the nominative forms kolauh, [kolauk], kulauh, kulauk, [kulauk], kuluk, k[uluk], [kuluk], kurlaug, kurlauk, k---auk, the genitive forms kulaukaR, kuuaukaR and the accusative forms kulah, kulug*u, kulug/kunluk. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gulaug Arnbjarnardttir in ch. 64; Gulaug Hrlfsdttir in ch. 70 and 71; Gulaug, wife of Vestmar in ch. 73; and Gulaug, daughter of ttar hvalr ("whale-calm") in ch. 83. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form for names in Gul- is Gulla. A short-form of Gulaug is Lauga. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208, 374 s.v. go, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Gulaug, Gullaug, Gu-, -laug
Guleif For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -leif see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Guleif, daughter of Ketill smijudrumbr ("smithy-drum, anvil") in ch. 34. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form for names in Gul- is Gulla. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. go; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Gum For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -msee above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as |ku(m)u. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. Gum, Gu-, -m
Gun For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -n see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gun Hrafnkelsdttir in ch. 11; Gun Bovarsdttir in ch. 21, 64, 81, 83, 86; Gun Hafrsdttir in ch. 25; Gun rlfsdttir in ch. 30; and Gun Brynjlfsdttir in ch. 76. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. go; NR s.v. -n
Gurr For the first element Gu-see above. The second element is -frr, which is derived from *friior and related to the adjective frr, meaning "beloved" or "fair" (see also Gufrr). Appears in a Danish runic inscription, kufrii, which is thought to refer to a Norwegian woman. May be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Godrida, Godrithe (c. 1109-1112), Godreda (c. 1138-1145), Guderide (c. 1138-1145), Gorreida (c. 1138-1145). This name appears in Landnmabk for Gurr Mrsdttir in ch. 31; Gurr Illugadttir in ch. 34; Gurr rbjarnardttir, wife of rsteinn Eirksson in ch. 38; Gurr rardttir in ch. 71; Gurr rkellsdttir in ch. 71; and Gurr Brynjlfsdttir in ch. 76. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Gurr rsteinnsdttir appears as the daughter of rsteinn surts inn spaka (Thrsteinn Black the Wise) and wife of the chieftain rkell trefill ("rag" or "fringe"). The name is also found in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395) and in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, for Gurr rbjarnardttir, who assists the prophetess in Greenland by singing the Varlokkur songs. A short form of this name is Gya. Another short form for this name is Gudda. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 111, 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. go; NR s.v.Fra
Gurn For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -rn see above. This name appears in Old Danish as Guthrun, in Old Swedish as Gudhrun and in OW.Norse as Gurn. Runic examples include the nominative forms kurun and |kurun. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gurn, whose mother was runn in ch. 17; Gurn, mother of rr kottr in ch. 32; Gurn svfsdttir in ch. 38 and 42; Gurn slfsdttir in ch. 46; Gurn rkelsdttir in ch. 54; Gurn, wife of Kjartan sgeirsson in ch. 59; Gurn rsteinsdttir in ch. 67; Gurn wife of Heinn rsteinsson in ch. 72; Gurn, daughter of rarinn slingr ("fortunate") and Gurn risdttir in ch. 75; Gurn mundadttir in ch. 81; Gurn, the mother of Smundr in ch. 92; Gurn Kolbeinsdttir, wife of Smundr fri ("the wise") in ch. 94; and Gurn, the grandmother of Bishop Magns, in ch. 94. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) appears as the name of Gurn svfsdttir, one of the central characters of the saga. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of Gurn is Gunna. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350-351; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208, 504 s.v. gorn; NR s.v. Gurn, Gu-, -rn, Rna
Guv, Guv For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gudhvi and in OW.Norse as Guv. Runic examples include a possible nominative case |kuui and the accusative case kuuiu. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. NR s.v. Guv, Gu-, -v, -vr
Guvor For the first element Gu-see above. For the second element -vor see above. Runic examples include the nominative form kuuar and accusative forms kufar and [kuuaru]. A short form for names in Gu- is Gufa or Gufi. NR s.v. Guvor, Gu-, -vor; NR s.v. -vor
Gufa, Gufi May be an Anglo-Scandinavian formation, found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Guua (c. 1202), Guue (c. 1185-1200), Goue (c. 1218-1219). FJ pp. 113
Gulla, Gylla A short form of feminine names in Gul-, Gull- and also a short form of the woman's name Gyrr. Found in Old Danish as Gylla and in Old Swedish as Gulla. Runic forms include nominative case gyla, kula, [kula], k[ulha|], kyla and genitive case kylu. May be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Golle (c. 1218-1219). FJ pp. 113; NR s.v. Gulla/Gylla
Gullaug The first element Gull- is a form of the first element Gu-. Compare to the woman's name Gulaug. For the second element -laug see above. Only occasional examples are found in Old Swedish (Gudhlgh) and OW.Norse. Runic examples include the nominative forms khulu, kulaug, kulauh, [kulauk], kulhu and the genitive form kulaug. NR s.v. Gullaug, Gulaug, Gu-, -laug
Gulley For the first element Gull- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms khulu and kulhu . NR s.v. Gully, Gull-, -y
Gunna A short form for the name Gurn. Also a short form of feminine names in Gunn-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr. Found as Gunna in Old Danish, Old Swedish and OW.Norse. Runic examples include the nominative forms kuina, kuna, [kuna], kuno, kyna, the genitive forms gunum, kunuR, ku-u and the accusative form kunu. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Gunna, Gunn-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr
GunnlfR The first element Gunn- is derived from *guni and is identical with Old Icelandic gunnr, gur, "battle." For the second element -lfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gunnlf. Runic examples include the nominative form gunilfr[kuilfr]. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. GunnlfR, Gunn-, -lfR, Gunna
Gunnfrr, Gunnrr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -frr see above. May occur in Old Swedish as Gunridh, the OW.Norse form is Gunnfrr. Occurs in the runic nominative form kunrir. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. Gunn(f)rr, Gunn-, -frr, Fra, Gunna
Gunngifu A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation (c. 1202-1219) from the Norse name-element Gunn- and the Old English name-element -gifu. For the first element Gunn- see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Gunniue and Guniue. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. FJ pp. 114, 344; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Gunnheir, Gunnhir For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gunhedh and in OW.Norse as Gunnheir. Runic examples include the nominative form guner and the accusative form kunai-. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnhir, Gunn-, -hir, Gunna
Gunnhildr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Gunhild, occurs in OW.Norse as Gunnhildr. Runic examples include nominative case [kunhiltr], kunhi..., kunilr, kuniltr, (k)(u)(n)iltr, kunitr, [k]u[ni]tr, genitive case ku(n)(in)(l)(t)(a)(r) and accusative case kunilt, kunilti. Anglo-Scandinavian forms include Gunnilt, Gunnild (c. 1163-1205), Gunild (c. 1202), Gunnilda (c. 1240-1306), Gonilda (c. 1240-1306), Gunnilde (c. 1198-1205), Gunillda (c. 1202). This name is frequent in Iceland and common in Norway through the entire medieval period. Found in Danish runic inscriptions and other Danish sources. Found in a number of Swedish runic inscriptions and fairly common in later Swedish sources. Related to Continental Germanic Gundihild. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gunnhildr, wife of Kolr in ch. 20; Gunnhildr slksdttir in chs. 28 and 34; Gunnhildr Smonsdttir in ch. 28; Gunnhildr Eirksdttir in ch. 59 and 61; and Gunnhildr, daughter of sror Hraldsson in ch. 75. Orkneyingsaga (c. 1200) lists this as the name of one of the daughters of the Norwegian king Eirkr blx ("bloodaxe"). In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Queen Gunnhildr is the widow of Eirkr. The name Gunnhildr also appears in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, where Queen Gunnhildr is identified as Gunnhildr Ozursdttir, wife of King Eirkr blox; there are also other women in this saga with the same name, such as the daughter of Jarl Hlfdan and granddaughter of King Haraldr hrfagr ("fair-hair"); and Gunnhildr the daughter of Bjorn Brynjlfsson. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 114-116, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr; NR s.v. Gunnhildr, Gunn-, -hildr, Gunna
Gunnlaug For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Compare with the woman's name Gulaug. occurs in Old Danish as Gunlgh and in OW.Norse as Gunnlaug. Runic examples include the accusative forms kulug, kunluk. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnlaug, Gulaug, Gunn-, -laug, Gunna
Gunnlo For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -lo see above. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 404 s.v. gunnr, lo; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Gunnur For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -ur or -unnr see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as kunur. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnur, Gunn-, -unnr/-ur, Gunna
Gunnvor For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -vor see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Gunnur, in Old Swedish as Gunnur and Gunvor, and in OW.Norse as Gunnvor. Runic examples include the nominative forms kunuar, kunuur, kunur, [kynuar], (u)nuaur and the accusative form kunuar. This name was borne by one of the daughters of the original settlers of Iceland. Found very frequently in Norway. Frequent in Danish where it appears as Gunnur or Latin Gunwara. This name appears in Landnmabk for Gunnvor, daughter of Hrgeirr inn spaki ("the wise") in chs. 14 and 96. Anglo-Scandinavian forms include Gonnora (c. 1197), Gunnora (c. 1197-1256), Gunnewar (c. 1202-1240), Gunware (c. 1179-1202), Gunneuare, Guneuuare, Gunner (c. 1300-1400). In Normandy the wife of Richard I and others bore this name, spelled variously as Gonnor, Gunnor, Gunwera. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 118-119, 344, 351-352; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. Gunnvor, Gunn-, -vor, Gunna
Gunnrr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -rr see above. Occurs in Old Swedish as Gunthrudh. A runic example in the nominative case is kunrur. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnrr, Gunn-, -rr, Gunna
Gya A short form of Gyrr or Gurr. ound in Old Danish as Gytha, in Old Swedish as Gydha and in OW.Norse as Gya. Found early in Norway, where it is common. Found less frequently in Iceland. Found in two Danish runic inscriptions and common in other Danish sources. Found in a few Swedish runic inscriptions and in some later Swedish sources. Runic examples include the nominative forms gya, kia, kua, [kua]. The name Gya appears in Landnmabk in ch. 69. Found in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, as Gya, the sister of Arinbjorn hersir ("chieftain"). May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Guede, Githe (c. 1219), Gide (c. 1210-1220), Ghithe (c. 1300's). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 119-120; NR s.v. Gya, Gyrr
Gylaug For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV
Gynna A short form of feminine names in Gunn-. Compare with the feminine name Gunna and with the Old Swedish name Gyna. Runic examples include the nominative forms kuina and kyna. NR s.v. Gynna, Gunna
Gyra Perhaps a short form of Gyrr. May be present in the runic nominative form [kura]. NR s.v. Gyra, Gyrr
Gyrr, Gyrr Derived from Gurr. Short forms of this name include Gya, Gyra and Gulla or Gylla. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 111, 119, 344, 348; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. go
 
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Name Notes Source
Hafra The first element Haf- is identical with Old Icelandic haf, "sea". For the second element -ra see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hafra rbergsdttir in chs. 21, 55 and 89. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
Halla Identical with Old Icelandic hallr, "flat stone, slab, big stone, boulder". This name appears in Landnmabk for Halla Eyjlfsdttir in ch. 42; Halla Gestsdttir in ch. 46; and Halla Steinlfsdttir in ch. 48. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Halla is the daughter of Gestr Oddleisson and mother of rgils Holluson. The name Halla also appears in Vpnfiringa saga as the daughter of Ltingr sbjarnarson. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr
Hallabera, Hallbera For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -bera is derived from the root ber, "bear" found also in berserkr. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallbera, daughter of lfr inn argi ("the virtuous") in ch. 18; Hallbera Snorradttir in ch. 48; Hallbera, daughter of roddr hjlmr ("helm") in ch. 60; and for Hallbera Onundardttir and her granddaughter Hallbera in ch. 73. In Vpnfiringa saga, Hallbera is the daughter of rgerr silfra ("the silver). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 58, 235 s.v. bera, hallr
Hallbjorg For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallbjorg Brsdttir in ch. 28. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 235 s.v. bjorg, hallr
Hallds For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallds Erpsdttir in chs. 38 and 29; Hallds orgrmsdttir in chs. 48 and 49. This name also appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, for the foster-mother of Gurr rbjarnardttir, who taught Gurr the Varlokkur songs. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 235 s.v. ds, hallr
Halldra, Hallra For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -ra or -dra see above. The name Halldra appears in Landnmabk for Halldra Geirmundardttir in ch. 12; Halldra, daughter of Hrlfr inn augi ("the wealthy") in ch. 21; Halldra rhallsdttir in ch. 39; Halldra Steinmsdttir in chs. 40 and 98; Halldra Gunnsteinsdttir in ch. 68; Halldra, daughter of rkell svarti ("the black") in ch. 72; Halldra, whose mother was Hallbera Onundardttir, in ch. 73; Halldra Einarsdttir in ch. 75; Halldra, daughter of Ormr naugi ("oppressed") in ch. 92; Halldra, wife of Bishop Magns Gissurarson in ch. 99. A short form of Halldra is Dra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 235, 743 s.v. hallr, rr
Hallerna For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -erna is identical to the Old Icelandic adjective ern, "brisk, vigorous". GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 133, 235 s.v. ern, hallr
Hallfrr For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Related to the Old Swedish name Halffred, occurs in OW.Norse as Hallfrr. May occur in the runic genitive form halfr.... This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallfrr orbjarnardttir in chs. 38 and 39; and for Hallfrr Egilsdttir in ch. 75. Hallfrr Egilsdttir, wife of rkell Geitirsson, appears in Vpnfiringa saga. Hallfrr Snorradttir, mother of Bishop rlakr, appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, and in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395). A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr, Fra
Hallgerr For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallgerr Tungu-Oddsdttir in chs. 20 and 51; Hallgerr sninbrk Hoskuldsdttir in chs. 38 and 39; Hallgerr Ornlfsdttir in ch. 46; Hallgerr, wife of Steinn inn danski ("the Dane") in ch. 46; Hallgerr Vermundardttir in ch. 48; and Hallgerr Hlmsteinsdttir in ch. 77. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Hallgerr langbrk ("long-legs") is the daughter of Hoskuldr Dala-Kollsson. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 235 s.v. Gerr, hallr
Hallgrma For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -grma see above. FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 216, 235 s.v. grma, hallr
Hallkatla For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -katla see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallkatla Bjarnardttir in ch. 46. A woman named Hallkatla appears in Vpnfiringa saga, daughter of irandi. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 235, 337 s.v. hallr, ketill
Halltta For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -tta is probably related to Old Icelandic tti, "terror, fear, dread". GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 345; CV pp. 235, 473 s.v. hallr, tti
Hallveig For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -veig see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hallveig Fradttir in ch. 9; Hallveig Einarsdttir in ch. 28; Hallveig rgrmsdttir in ch. 39; Hallveig Oddadttir in ch. 44; Hallveig Bjarnardttir in ch. 92; and Hallveig rviardttir in chs. 95 and 97. Hallveig, the daughter of Einarr of Laugarbrekka and mother of Gurr rbjarnardttir, appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 235, 690 s.v. hallr, veig; NR s.v. -vig
Hallvor For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -vor see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 351-352; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr; NR s.v. -vor
Hlma   GB pp. 11
Haurlaug The first element Haur- is from Primitive Scandinavian *haburaR, "buck, he-goat". For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the accusative case as haurlau. NR s.v. Haurlaug, Haur-, -laug
Heinds, Hiinds The first element Hein- or Hiin- is of disputed origin. The masculine name Heinn/Hiinn may have come into Scandinavia from the Hjaning sagas. There is a discrepancy in pronunciation between medieval West Scandinavian and medieval East Scandinavian forms and hitherto there has not been a satisfactory explanation. The OW.Norse form with /e/ is assumed to have been formed along the pattern of OW.Norse heinn "fur, pelt", but the discrepancy between the East Scandinavian /i/ and the West Scandinavian /e/ may also be explained as normal sound differences. The Viking Age runic examples seems to occur both as /i/ and /e/. Found in Old Swedish as Hidhindis. Runic examples in the nominative case include haintis and hiintis. NR s.v. Hein-/Hiinds, Hein-/Hiin-, -ds
Heinfast For the first element Hein- or Hiin- see above. For the second element fast- or -fost see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms hiinfast and [hiinfast]. NR s.v. Hein-/Hiinfast, Hein-/Hiin-, -fast/-fost
Heingunnr For the first element Hein- or Hiin- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form hiinkun. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Hein-/Hiingunnr, Hein-/Hiin-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Heinv For the first element Hein- or Hiin- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form iinui. NR s.v. Hein-/Hiinv, Hein-/Hiin-, -v, -vr
Heir Identical to Old Icelandic heir, "heath". Occurs as the name of a volva or prophetess in Volusp as well as a human name element. This name appears in Landnmabk for Heir volva ("prophetess") in ch. 56. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 247 s.v. heir
Heilv, Hilv The first element Hil- or Heil- is from OW.Norse heill "happiness, luck" or the OW.Norse adjective heill "happy, lucky". For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Swedish as Helvi (this example from Gotland). Occurs in the runic nominative form [haili]. NR s.v. Hilv, Hil-, -v, -vr
Heimlaug, Himlaug The first element Heim- or Him- is from OW.Norse heimr "home".For the second element -laug see above. Appears in OW.Norse as Heimlaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form [imlauk]. This name appears in Landnmabk for Heimlaug rarinsdttir in ch. 95. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 249, 374 s.v. heima, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Himlaug, Him-, -laug
Hekja The name Hekja appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, as the name of a Scottish bondswoman sent by Karlsefni to reconnoitre Vinland. GB pp. 11
Helga, Hlga Occurs in Old Danish as Helgha, in Old Swedish as Hlgha, and in OW.Norse as Helga. This name is the feminine equivalent to the man's name Helgi, from the OW.Norse adjective heilagr "holy", during heathen times with the meaning "dedicated to the gods". Runic examples include the nominative forms elha, elka, halha, he(l)ga, helka, hlga, hlka, [ilka] and the genitive forms helgu, hlku. This popular name appears in Landnmabk for Helga Arnardttir in chs. 3 and 5; Helga rardttir in chs. 10 and 21; Helga rgeirsdttir in ch. 25; Helga Onundardttir in ch. 28; Helga Kjallaksdttir in ch. 30; Helga, the wife of smundr rgestsson in ch. 30; Helga Steinsdttir in ch. 31; Helga lfsdttir in ch. 40; Helga, daughter of ni bogsveigir ("bow-swayer, archer"); Helga risdttir in ch. 54; Helga Helgadttir in ch. 70; Helga rgeirsdttir in ch. 73; Helga Bjarnardttir in ch. 75; Helga Hlmsteinsdttir in ch. 77; Helga rardttir in chs. 81 and 99; Helga sgeirsdttir in ch. 89; Helga Onundardttir in ch. 92; Helga Hrlfsdttir in chs. 92 and 94; Helga Ormsdttir in ch. 97; Helga rndardttir in ch. 98; and Helga Jnsdttir in ch. 100. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Helga is the name of the daughter of lfr feilan ("wolf-cub"). In Hnsa-ris saga the name Helga appears for the wife of Gunnar Lfarson. Helga in fagra ("the fair") appears in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu, the daughter of rsteinn Egilsson and granddaughter of Egill Skallagrmsson. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 254-255 s.v. Helgi, helga; NR s.v. Hlga
Helgunnr The first element Helg- or Hlg- is from the OW.Norse adjective heilagr, "holy," or may be adapted from the names Helga/Hlga, Helgi/Hlgi. Occurs in the runic nominative form helgun. NR s.v. Hlgunnr, Hlg-, -unnr/-ur
Herborg The first element Her- or Hr- comes from Germanic *harjaz and is related to Old Icelandic herr, "army, military force". The side-form Heri- or Hri- appears before non-palatal vowels. For the second element -borg see above. FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66. 258 s.v. bjorg, herr
Herds For the first element Her see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Herds, mother of Steins skld in ch. 32; Herds Bolladttir in ch. 38; Herds Tindsdttir in ch. 48; and Herds rardttir in chs. 60 and 64. Laxdla saga (c. 1245) also mentions Herds Bolladttir. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 258 s.v. ds, herr
Herfrr, Herrr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herfrr, Herrr. Occurs in the runic nominative form (h)[a]rfri[r]. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Hrfrr, Hr-, -frr, Fra
Hergerr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 258, 344, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. herr, Gerr
Hergunnr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 258 s.v. gunnr, herr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Herleif For the first element Her see above. For the second element -leif or -lif see above. May occur in Old Danish as Herlef. Occurs in the runic nominative form [harlaif]. NR s.v. Hrlif, Hr-, -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Herrr, Herfrr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herfrr, Herrr. Occurs in the runic nominative form (h)[a]rfri[r]. This name appears in Landnmabk for Herrr Gautsdttir in ch. 40. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 258 s.v. herr; NR s.v. Hrfrr, Hr-, -frr, Fra
Hervor For the first element Her see above. For the second element -vor see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hervor, whose mother was rgerr Eylaugsdttir, in ch. 10. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 351-352; CV pp. 258 s.v. herr; NR s.v. -vor
Herrr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -rr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herrr. occurs in the runic nominative form harrur. This name appears in Landnmabk for Herrr Breiardttir in ch. 28 and Herrr Illugadttir in ch. 34. The short form for names in -ra is ra. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV p. 258, 747 s.v. herr, rr, ra; NR s.v. Hrrr, Hr-, -rr
Hildibjorg The first element Hildi- or Hild- (used before a vowel) come from *heldioR, "battle" and are related to Old Icelandic hildr, "battle". For the second element -bjorg see above. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 261 s.v. bjorg, hildr
Hildigerr, Hildegrdh, Hildigard For the first element Hildi- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. Only one instance of this name occurs in West Scandinavia, where it is used for a fictional character. However, the name is recorded in Sweden as Hildegrdh, and in Denmark as Hildigard. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. FJ pp. 141, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hildigunnr For the first element Hildi- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hildigunnr, wife of Sigmundr Ketilsson, in ch. 28. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 261 s.v. gunnr, hildr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Hildirr For the first element Hildi- see above. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. The second element -rr is of uncertain origin. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hildr, Hilda See Hildi-, above. This name may also be used as a short-form of other names in Hild-. The name Hildr is used for one of the Valkyries, but is also a very common woman's name in Norway and Iceland during the Viking Age. It is also recorded in Sweden and Denmark. The name Hilda appears in Landnmabk for Hilda stjarna ("star") rvaldsdttir in ch. 23 and Hilda rinsdttir in ch. 67. The form Hildr also appears in Landnmabk for Hildr in mjva ("the slim") Hognadttir in ch. 40; Hildr Hermundardttir in ch. 59; Hildr, sister of Ketill istill ("thistle"), in ch. 74; Hildr sbjarnardttir and her granddaughter Hildr risdttir in ch. 85; and Hildr Baugsdttir in ch. 91. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Hildr is the baby daughter of rsteinn surts inn spaka (Thrsteinn Black the Wise) and is killed in the family drowning in Breidafjord. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 140, 344; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hjalmds The first element Hjlm- is identical with Old Icelandic hjlmr, helm, helmet". For the second element -ds see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form hialmtis. NR s.v. Hialmds, Hialm-, -ds
Hjlmgerr For the first element Hjlm- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 266-267 s.v. Gerr, hjlmr
Hjalmlaug, Hialmlaug For the first element Hjlm- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms hielmlaug and hielmlauk. NR s.v. Hialmlaug, Hialm-, -laug
Hjlp, Hjolp Originally a by-name related to Old Icelandic hjolp, "help". Recorded in West Scandinavia at the time of the Landnm. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Helperby, Heolperbi, Hilprebe, Ilprebi, Helprebi, Helperthorpe. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 141-142
Hjords The first element Hjor- is identical to Old Icelandic hjorr, "a sword". For the second element -ds see above. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 268 s.v. ds, hjorr
Hjotra The name Hjotra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family. All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjotra, Hjotra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames.  
Hlagunnr For the second element -gunnr see above. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Hlei The name Hlei appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the sister of King Gomundr.  
Hlf, Lf Originally a by-name. From OW.Norse hlf "defense, protection; byrnie, shield" and related to Old Icelandic hlfa, "to give shelter, to cover" and to hlf, "defence, protection". The form Lf may be Hlf with the initial h lost, or it may be related to Old Icelandic lf, "life". This name appears in Landnmabk for Hlf hestageldir ("horse-gelder") in ch. 27; Hlf, mother of Gunnar Hlfarson in ch. 40; Hlf Hrlfsdttir in ch. 66; and Hlf Heinsdttir in ch. 68. The name Lf appears only in mythology. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 188; CV pp. 271 s.v. hlfa, hlf
Hlfhildr The first element Hlf- is from OW.Norse hlf "defense, protection; byrnie, shield". For the second element -hildr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative forms lifilt and lif.... NR s.v. Hlfhildr, Hlf-, -hildr
Hlfey For the first element Hlf- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form lifayaR. NR s.v. Hlfy, Hlf-, -y
Hln Usually found as a goddess-name, a wife of inn, also in a large number of poetic compounds meaning "woman" such as hrnga-hln, bauga-hln, "ring-lady". The root comes from Old Icelandic hleina, "to save, defend," which is related to Old English hlna and modern English "lean". The related noun hlein is used of the upright warp-weighted loom, which is leaned against a wall in use. CV pp. 270, 271 s.v. Hln, hleina, hlein
Holma Short form of feminine names in Holm-. Runic examples occur in the nominative forms hulma, [hulma], -(u)(l)mahulmu. NR s.v. Holma, Holm-
Holmds The first element Hlm- is identical to OW.Norse hlmr, "island". For the second element -ds see above. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as [hulmntis], hulmtis, [hulmtis], in the genitive case as hulmtis and in the accusative case as hulmtisi. NR s.v. Holmds, Holm-, -ds
Hlmfrr For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Holmfrith, in Old Swedish as Holmfridh and in OW.Norse as Hlmfrr. Runic examples include the nominative forms [holmfr], hulfri, hulmfriR, hulmfri, h(u)lmfri, hu(l)(m)(f)ri, [hu](l)mfri, [hulmfri], hulmfrir, hulmfri..., hulmri, humfrir, hum(f)rir, ulmf(r)[in](R), ulmfris, [ulmfri], -hulf(r)i, the genitive forms hulmfiaR, h[u]lmfriaR and the accusative forms hulmfrii, hulmf-ii. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 280-281 s.v. hlmr; NR s.v. Holmfrr, Holm-, -frr, Fra
Hlmgerr For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Holgerth and in Old Swedish as Holmgrdh. Runic examples include the nominative forms (h)ulker, [hulm]kir, hulmkirr. NR s.v. Holmgrr, Holm-, -grr
Hlmlaug For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in OW.Norse as Hlmlaug. Runic examples include nominative forms [holmlauk], hulmlauk U461, hulmnlauk, hu..., [h...luk] and the genitive form hulmlaukaR. NR s.v. Holmlaug, Holm-, -laug
Holmv For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form hulmnui. NR s.v. Holmv, Holm-, -v, -vr
Hrafnhildr, Rafnhildr The first element Hrafn- is identical with Old Icelandic hrafn, "raven". For the second element -hildr see above. A few instances of this name are recorded in West Scandinavia. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hrafnhildr Ketilsdttir in ch. 90 and Hrafnhildr Strlfsdttir in chs. 90 and 91. The name Hrafnhildr appears in the legendary saga Orvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Oddr. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Rauenhilbanc (c. 1209), Rauenylridding (c. 1320). GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 212, 349; CV pp. 261, 281 s.v. hildr, hrafn
Hrefna Found in OW.Norse as Hrefna. This name represents a feminine form of OW.Norse hrafn "raven" or corresponds to the masculine name Hrafn. Compare with hrefna "female raven" in Modern Icelandic. Occurs in the runic nominative form hribno. Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as Hrefna sgeirsdttir, the daughter of sgeirr ikollr ("the hot-head") and wife of Kjartan. Hrefna sgeirsdttir is also mentioned in chs. 39 and 53 of Landnmabk. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 281 s.v. hrafn; NR s.v. Hrfna, Hrafn
Hrmhildr The first element Hrm- is probably identical to Old Icelandic hrm, "frost, rime, ice". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 285-286 s.v. hildr, hrm
Hra A short form of feminine names in Hr- Occurs in the runic nominative form hrua. NR s.v. Hra, Hr-
Hrgera, Hrgra The first element Hr- is from OW.Norse hrr "praise, fame," which is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *hriR. The second element -gera represents a weak side-form of the second element -grr or -gerr (see above). Compare with OW.Norse Hrgerr. Occurs in the runic nominative form rokera. NR s.v. Hrgra, Hr-, -gra
Hrlaug For the first element Hr- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form [hrulauhar]. NR s.v. Hrlaug, Hr-, -laug
Hrn For the first element Hr- see above. For the second element -n see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hrn Ketilsdttir in ch. 30; Hrn Illugadttir in ch. 46; Hrn Skeggjadttir in ch. 55; and Hrn Unadttir in ch. 58. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 287 s.v. hrr; NR s.v. -n
Hrj For the first element Hr- see above. The second element -j, -j, or -i is from OW.Norse j "folk, people." The name Hrj occurs in medieval Gotlandic runic inscriptions as well as in the runic genitive form roiauar and the accusative form roiau. NR s.v. Hri, Hr-, -i
Hrv For the first element Hr- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Swedish as Rodhvi. Occurs in the runic nominative form ruui. NR s.v. Hrv, Hr-, -v, -vr
Huld, Hulda From Old Icelandic Huld, the name of a giantess, related to hulda, "hiding, secrecy". Often found in the sagas as a name of a sei-kona or witch, which may indicate that this was not a name actually used for humans but only appeared in a fictional sense to indicate a villainess, as in Ynglingasaga. CV pp. 292 s.v. Huld, hulda
Hngerr The first element Hn- is of doubtful origin, but may be identical to Old Icelandic hnn, "bear-cub" or perhaps be derived from Primitive Scandinavian *hun, "high". For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Hngerr roddsdttir in chs. 20 and 86. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerr
Hnhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation. For the first element Hn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Hunildehus (c. 1200). FJ pp. 145, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
 
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Name Notes Source
Iunn Iunn was the wife of the god of poetry, Bragi, and was herself the keeper of the golden apples which were the food of the gods. Found also as a human name in Landnmabk, where it is used for Iunn Molda-Gnpsdttur in chs. 14 and 86 and Iunn Hmundardttir in ch. 67. GB pp. 12; CV pp. 313 s.v. Iunn
gulfrr The first element gul- may be derived from OW.Norse gull "sea-urchin", but nevertheless probably has an original sense of "hedgehog". For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Danish as Iulfrith. Runic examples include the nominative forms [ikulfri] and hulf(r)i. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. gulfrr, gul-, -frr, Fra
Inga A short form of names in Ing-, Ingi-. This name is very common is Swedish and Danish, and probably spread from there to Norway in the 1200's, where it then became fairly common. Occurs in Old Danish, Old Swedish and in OW.Norse as Inga. Runic examples include nominative case ika, in(k)a, [ika], inka, [inka], genitive case ikur, ikuR, inku, and one example in which the case is uncertain, iku. Found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Inga (c. 1160) and Ynga (c. 1202). GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 149; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Inga, Ing(in)-
Ingibjorg, Ingeborg, Ingeberg The first elementes Ing- (found before a vowel), Ingi- (used before a consonant), Ingin- and Ingv- are derived from Germanic *Ingwia-, compounded with the second element of belonging, -ia-, to form Germanic *Ingwaz, which is assumed to be the name of a Germanic god who the person worshipped, nevertheless there is no direct proof. This name element may be related to other words of Indo-European origin, such as Greek encox, "lance, staff" in a meaning related perhaps to male genitalia, since the name is also thought to be associated with the god Ingvi-Freyr. Alternately the name may indicate national origin from the Germanic *ingwianiz, "Ingaevones" (Latin inguaeones, ingaeuones) described by Pliny and Tacitus, who describe this people as a coastal Germanic tribe who took their name from that of a mythical person from which the tribe sprang (heros eponymos). For the second element -bjorg or -borg see above. Found in Old Danish as Ingiburgh, in Old Swedish as Ingeborgh and in OW.Norse as Ingibjorg or Ingibiorg. Runic examples include the nominative forms inkiber, inkiberh, inki:burk. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ingibjorg sbjarnardttir in chs. 23, 38 and 55; Ingibjorg Gilsdttir in ch. 40; Ingibjorg Rausdttir in ch. 63; and Ingibjorg Hrgeirsdttir in ch. 75. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) Ingibjorg Finnsdttir is the wife of Earl rfinnr and mother of Paul and Erlend. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Princess Ingibjorg is the sister of King lfr Tryggvasson of Norway and a friend of Kjartan. Another Ingibjorg appears in Vpnfiringa saga, daughter of Hrgeirr inn hvta ("the white"). The name Ingibjorg appears in the legendary saga Orvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the name of Hjalmar's beloved. This name appears as well in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the mother of Egill einhenda ("one-hand"). Ingibjorg also appears in the legendary saga Helga ttr rissonar, c. 1390, as the daughter of King Gomundr. Ingibjorg in fagra ("the fair") is the wife of Frijf inn frkna ("the brave") in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. A short form of Ingibjorg is Imba. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 66, 313-314 s.v. bjorg, Ingi; NR s.v. Ingibiorg, Ing(in)-, -biorg/-borg
Ingiy For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ing. Occurs in the runic nominative form inkiu. NR s.v. Ingiy, Ing(in)-, -y
Ingifrr, Ingirir, Ingrir For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found fairly frequently in Danish (for example in the Latinized form Ingifridis) as well as in Swedish. Forms in Ingirir are very common in Norway but less so in Iceland, and are also recorded in Danish and Swedish. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingifrith and in Old Swedish as Ingefridh. Runic examples include the nominative forms hikifrir, [inkifri], genitive forms [ikifri--], RkRkrinr and the accusative form ik[in]frii. Ingifrr may be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Ingefrit (c. 1185) and Ingefrid, while Ingirir may be the root of names such as Ingeride (c. 1163), Ingerithe, Ingerith (c. 1218), Ingrede, Ingretha (c. 1214). This name appears in Landnmabk for Ingirr Kjartansdttir in ch. 59. Ingirir rkelsdttir appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as a widow on the Isle of Man who marries Sveinn sleifarson. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. FJ pp. 150, 151, 343, 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Ingifrr, Ing(in)-, -frr, Fra
Ingigerr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingigerth, in Old Swedish as Ingegrdh and in OW.Norse as Ingigerr. Runic examples include the nominative forms igikeR, ikiker, ikik(e)r, ikikiar, ikikir, inkikar, inkik[h]r, inkikier, in[k]ik[in]r, inkikir, inkikirr, accusative forms ikikeri, inkikiari, and a form in which the case is uncertain, inkikiar. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ingigerr, sister of King Dagstyggr in ch. 63. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) Ingigerr lfsdttir appears as the sister of Sveinn sleifarson and is married to rbjorn Clerk and later to rfinnr Brsason of Stronsay. The name Ingigerr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar for three women, the daughter of King Hergeirr, the daughter of Hreggvid, and the daughter of Kollr. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 313-314 s.v. Gerr, Ingi; NR s.v. Ingigrr, Ing(in)-, -grr
Ingigunnr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form as inkikuni. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Ingigunnr, Ing(in)-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Ingilborg Christian. See Engilborg above. GB pp. 12; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjorg
Ingilaug For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ingelgh. Runic examples include the nominative forms ikilauh and ikiluk. NR s.v. Ingilaug, Ing(in)-, -laug
Ingileif For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -leif, -lif, -lof see above. Occurs in Old Swedish as Ingelef and in OW.Norse as Ingileif. Runic examples include the nominative forms [ikilaif], ikilef, [iku]lef. A few instances of this name are recorded in Iceland, and it is common in Norway from the 900's onward. It is found in Sweden as well, but not in Denmark. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ingileif sbjarnardttir in ch. 77. An Anglo-Scandinavian form may be found in the Latinized Ingolieva (c. 1180-1200). A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 150, 344, 350; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Ingilif, Ing(in)-, -lif/-lof
Ingim For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -msee above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingimoth and in Old Swedish as Ingemodh. Found in the runic nominative form inkimo. A short form of feminine names in -m is Moda. NR s.v. Ingim, Ing(in)-, -m
Ingirn For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -rn see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ingerun. Runic examples include the nominative forms ikirun, [ikirun], [iskirun] and the genitive form [iki]runaR. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. NR s.v. Ingirn, Ing(in)-, -rn, Rna
Ingiveldr Ingveldr, Ingvildr, Ingvoldr For the first element Ingi- see above. The second element in these names seems to be from vald, "might, power". A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314, 675, 721 s.v. Ingi, valda, voldugr
Ingira For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -ra see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms [igiur-], ikiora, [ikiur-], the genitive forms ikioru, ikioruR and the accusative forms inkiuru, ink-[u]ru. NR s.v. Ingira, Ing(in)-, -ra
Ingrr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingirith, in Old Swedish as Ingridh and in OW.Norse as Ingirr. Runic examples include the nominative forms ainkri, ikri, ikrir, infri[], inkri, [in]rir. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Ingrr, Ing(in)-, -frr, Fra
Ingur, Ingunn For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -ur or -unnr see above. The name Ingur appears in Landnmabk for Ingur, wife of sbjorn Arnrsson in ch. 28. The form Ingunnr is also found in Landnmabk for Ingunnr rlfsdttir in ch. 74 and Ingunnr, wife of Ketill hngr in ch. 90. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Ingunn rolfsdttir is the wife of Glmr Geirason and mother of rr Ingunnarson. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314, 655 s.v. Ingi, unnr
sgerr The first element s- is probably from Old Icelandic ss, "ice on sea or water". For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for sgerr rsteinsdttir in ch. 46 and sgerr Hunda-Steinardttir in ch. 55. The name sgerr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of King Hlover who married King Hergeirr. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 319 s.v. Gerr, ss
Isibel Christian, Isobel GB pp. 12
sond Celtic, Yseult GB pp. 12
 
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Name Notes Source
Jarrr, Jarrr The first element seems to be from the stem of Old Icelandic jorr, genitive jarar, "earth". For the second element -rr see above. The short form for names in -ra is ra. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 154; CV p. 747 s.v. rr, ra
Jrngerr The first element Jrn- is identical with Old Icelandic jrn, "iron". For the second element -gerr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Jrngerr rarinsdttir in ch. 29; and Jrngerr Ljtsdttir in ch. 83. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 325 s.v. Gerr, jrn
Jds The first element J- or I- comes from OW.Norse jr (derived from Germanic *ehwaz) "horse". For the second element -ds see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Jds Illugadttir in ch. 34; Jds Snortardttir in ch. 42; and Jds rarinsdttir in ch. 46. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 326 s.v. ds, jr
Jfast For the first element J- or I- see above. Runic examples include the nominative case iofast and accusative case iofastu. For the second element -fast or -fost see above. NR s.v. Ifast, I-, -fast/-fost
Jfrr For the first element J- or I- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Jfrr or Jrr. Occurs in the runic nominative form iufri. This name appears in Landnmabk for Jfrr Gunnarsdttir in chs. 20, 40 and 86 and Jfrr Tungu-Oddsdttir in chs. 20 and 26. Jfrr Tungu-Oddsdttir also appears in Hnsa-ris saga. Jfrr Gunnardttir is also mentioned in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 326 s.v. jr; NR s.v. Ifrr, I-, -frr, Fra
Jofurfast, Jofurfost The first element Jofur- or Iofur- comes from OW.Norse jofurr, which is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *eburaR "prince", figuratively from "wild boar". For the second element -fast or -fost see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms iafurfast, iafurfost, iufrfast, iufurfast, iufurfas[t], iufur[-ast], the genitive form iufurfast and the accusative forms iafa=ur=k=ut=fast, [iufirfast]. NR s.v. Iofurfast/-fost, Iofur-, -fast/-fost
Jofurfrr, Iofurfrr For the first element Jofur- or Iofur- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms [iafurfri...] and iyfur*fir. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Iofurfrr, Iofur-, -frr, Fra
Jhanna Christian, Joanna. A short form for Jhanna is Jka. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Jka Jka is a short form for Jhanna. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Jlinn   GB pp. 12
Jra This name appears in Landnmabk for Jra Helgadttir in ch. 46 and Jra Harradttir in ch. 55. GB pp. 12
Jreir The first element Jr- is derived from *ebura, "wild boar" and related to Old Icelandic jofurr, "king, prince, warrior", from the custom of wearing a boar crest on the helm. For the second element -eir see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Jreir Olvisdttir in ch. 22; Jreir Tindsdttir in ch. 28; Jreir irandadttir in chs. 81 and 83; and Jreir, mother of Ari prests hins fri ("the wise priest") in ch. 83. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 247, 326 s.v. heir, jr
Jrhildr Possibly an Anglo-Scandinavian formation. For the first element Jr- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form [in]orilt-. May be represented in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Joril, Jorild (c. 1202). FJ pp. 158, 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 347 s.v. hildr, jofurr; NR s.v. Irhildr, Ir-, -hildr
Jrunnr For the first element Jr- see above. For the second element -ur or -unnr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Jrunn. Runic examples include the nominative forms iaurun, iurun, -(u)(r)(u)(n), the genitive form [io]runa and the accusative forms iuruni, (in)u(r)un(in). This name appears in Landnmabk for Jrunn Helgadttir in ch. 20; Jrunn ormardttir in ch. 21; Jrunn Einarsdttir in ch. 29; Jrunn Ingimundardttir in chs. 55 and 56; Jrunn, mother of Hallr prestr ("priest"), in ch. 83; Jrunn manvitsbrekka ("slope of man's wit") Ketilsdttir in ch. 85; Jrunn, wife of Hafr-Bjorn, in ch. 86; Jrunn Hjaltadttir in ch. 94; Jrunn, sister of Grmr logsogumar ("law-speaker") in ch. 95; and Jrunn Olvisdttir in ch. 98. This name appears twice in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): Jrunn Bjornsdottir is the wife of Hoskuldr Dala-Kollsson; and Jrunn manvitsbrekka. Another Jrunn appears as the wife of Oddr Onundarson in Hnsa-ris saga. There is also a Jrunn in Vpnfiringa saga, Jrunn Einarsdttir. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 347 s.v. jofurr; NR s.v. Irunnr, Ir-, -unnr/-ur
Jutta   GB pp. 12
 
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Name Notes Source
Kaln Celtic, Kathleen. This name appears in Landnmabk for Kaln, the daughter of Gongu-Hrlfr (Rollo), in ch. 32. GB pp. 12
Kra   GB pp. 12
Kata "Kate". Kata is a short-form for the name Katrn. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Kta Kta (feminine name). Feminine equivalent to the masculine name Kti, which is from the OW.Norse adjective ktr "glad, cheerful". Runic examples include the nominative form kata and the accusative form katu. NR s.v.
Katla See -katla, above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Katla, mother of rgrmr Kotluson, in ch. 46. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
Katrn Christian, Cathrine. The short form of Katrn is Kata. GB pp. 12; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
KetilalfR, KtillfR The first element Ketil- or Ktil- is from OW.Norse ketill, originally "kettle" but meaning also "helmet" or "chieftain with helmet." For the second element -lfR see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketilelf. Occurs in the runic nominative form kitelfR. NR s.v. KtillfR, Ktil-, -lfR
Ketiley For the first element Ketil- or Ktil- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ktil. Runic examples include nominative case katily, ketilau, [ketilau], [ketilu], [kitilau] and genitive case ketilyaR. NR s.v. Ktily, Ktil-, -y
Ketilgerr For the first element Ketil- or Ktil- see above. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. Runic examples include nominative case ketilkir and possibly accusative case netilkiari. NR s.v. Ktilgrr, Ktil-, -grr
Ketillaug For the first element Ketil- or Ktil- see above. For the second element -laug or the weak side-form -lauga see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketillgh, in Old Swedish as Ktillgh, and in OW.Norse s Ketillaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form kitiluha. NR s.v. Ktillaug/-lauga, Ktil-, -laug
Ketilrr For the first element Ketil- or Ktil- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketilfrith, in Old Swedish as Ktilfridh, and in OW.Norse as Ketilrr. Occurs in the runic nominative forms kitilfiriR and kit:itf[ri]. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349, 350; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill, NR s.v. Ktilfrr, Ktil-, -frr, Fra
Ketilv For the first element Ketil- or Ktil- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples include nominative forms katilui, katilui, ketilu[in], |kitilui, [kiti]lui, [kitilui]. NR s.v. Ktilv, Ktil-, -v
Kitta Kitta is a short-form for the name Kristn. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Kjalvor The first element in these names comes from Old Icelandic kjolr, genitive kjalar, "keel", a term also used of the mountains that divide Norway from Sweden, and for the spine of a book. For the second element -vor see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Kjalvor, the maternal aunt of Tungu-Oddr in chs. 20 and 51. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 351-352; CV pp. 341 s.v. kjolr; NR s.v. -vor
Kolbrn The first element Kol- is identical with Old Icelandic kol, "coals, black as coal". Found as a nickname. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 81, 347 s.v. brn, kol, Kolbrn; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolfinna For the first element Kol- see above. For the second element -finna see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Kolfinna, daughter of Illugi inn svarti ("the black") in chs. 25 and 59; Kolfinna Hallsdttir in ch. 60; and Kolfinna Hngsdttir in ch. 90. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 154, 347 s.v. finnr, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolfrosta For the first element Kol- see above. The second element -frost is related to Old Icelandic frost, "frost". This name appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the name of the mother of King Hrekr. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. FJ pp. 343, 345; CV pp. 174-175, 347 s.v. frost, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolgrma For the first element Kol- see above. For the second element -grma see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Kolgrma Beinisdttir in ch. 98. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 216, 347 s.v. grma, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolla Found in OW.Norse as the by-name Kolla, for which the etymology is uncertain but which may be related to OW.Norse kolla "female, woman". Kolla is also found as a short form of feminine names in Kol-. occurs in the runic nominative form kola. NR s.v. Kolla
Kolerna For the first element Kol- see above. The second element may be related to Old Icelandic erna, "maid-servant". A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 347, 734 s.v. kol, erna; NR s.v. Kolla
Kormlo Celtic, Gormlaith. This name appears in Landnmabk for Kormlo, daughter of Kjarvalr, an Irish king. GB pp. 13
Krafla While Geirr Bassi reports this as a woman's name, I've been unable to find other documentation contining this as a name. If it is a valid name, it may be related to Old Icelandic krafla, "to paw or scrabble with the hands", an infant's nickname. This is also the name of an Icelandic volcano. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 354 s.v. krafla
Kristn Christian name, a Norse form of Latin Christina. Found in Old Danish as Kristina, in Old Swedish as Kristina, Kirstin etc., and in OW.Norse as Kristn. Occurs in the runic nominative form kr(e)stin. A short form for Kristn is Kitta. GB pp. 13; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Kristn
Kristrn Christian. For the second element -rn see above. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rn; NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
 
L
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Name Notes Source
Langlf Originally a nickname, "long-life". A few instances of Langlf occurring as a personal name appear in Norway after 1200. Found in Denmark as Langliva from c. 1150. May be represented in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Langliuetorp (c. 1100's). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 184
Lauga Lauga is a short form of the name Gulaug. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Leikn, Lekn, Lkn This name is related to the Old Icelandic word leika, "to play, sport; to delude, trick", also used in phrases such as "to be hag-ridden" in the sense of nightmares. Also related to the giantess' name Leikn, which was also used to mean "she-troll, ogress, sorceress". For the second element -n see above. The name Lekn appears in Landnmabk for Lekn, mother of rgrmr and Finnr inn draumspakr ("dream-speaker") in ch. 73. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 382 s.v. leika, Leikn; NR s.v. -n
Lf, Hlf Originally a by-name. Possibly related to Old Icelandic hlfa, "to give shelter, to cover" and to hlf, "defence, protection". The form Lf may be Hlf with the initial h lost, or it may be related to Old Icelandic lf, "life". The name Hlf appears in Landnmabk for Hlf hestageldr ("horse-gelder") in ch. 27; Hlf Hrlfsdttir in ch. 66; and Hlf Heinsdttir in ch. 68. The name Lf appears only in mythology. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 188; CV pp. 271 s.v. hlfa, hlf
Lknv The first element Lkn- is from OW.Norse lkn "goodness, compassion, favor, help, solace". For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in the runic genitive form liknuiaR. NR s.v. Lknv, Lkn-, -v
Lna Christian name. This name appears in Landnmabk for Lna, daughter of rleif rardttir in ch. 48. GB pp. 13
Lnhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction. The first element ln- is related to Old Icelandic ln, "flax, linen". For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Linild (c. 1202). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 189, 345, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Ljt May derive from Old Icelandic *ljtr, "giving light" but may instead be related to Old Icelandic ljtr, "ugly". This name is often used in the sagas for an old, hag-like woman who is usually depicted as a sei-kona or witch. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ljt, mother of Hrolleifr inn mikli ("the great, the large") in ch. 58; Ljt Einarsdttir in ch. 74; and Ljt, whose farm was at Ljtarstoum, in ch. 92. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 395-396 s.v. ljtr
Ljtunn For the first element Ljt- see above. For the second element -unn see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ljtunnr, the sister of Kolgrmr inn gamli ("the old") and wife of Bjorn gullberi ("gold-bearer") in ch. 19. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 395-396, 655 s.v. ljtr, unnr
Ljfa Identical to Old Icelandic ljfr, "dear, beloved; mild, gentle, kind". Found as a woman's name in western Iceland. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ljfa, wife of Bjorn of Bjarnarfjor, in ch. 53. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 396 s.v. ljfr
Ljfvina For the first element Ljf- see above. The second element -vina is identical to Old Icelandic vinr, "friend". This name appears in Landnmabk for Ljfvina, daughter of the king of Bjarmaland, in ch. 40. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 396, 709 s.v. ljfr, vinr
Lofnheir The first element Lofn- is used as the name of the goddess Lofn, one of Frigga's handmaidens, known as the goddess of love. The name is akin to modern English "love". For the second element -heir see above. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247, 397 s.v. heir, Lofn
Lofthna, Lopthna The first element may be related to the masculine name Loptr, which appears in the Eddas as one of the names of Loki, and as a masculine human name in Landnmabk. The second element is identical with Old Icelandic hna, "hen". This name appears in Landnmabk for Lofthna Arinbjarnardttir in ch. 22. The form Lofthna appears in the legendary saga Orvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Oddr. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 305, 398 s.v. hna, Loptr
Lta This name may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic lta, "to lout, bow down; to kneel in Christian worship; to pay homage to". GB pp. 13; CV pp. 400 s.v. lta
 
M
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Name Notes Source
Mbil This name appears in Landnmabk for Mbil, the wife of Helgi Hngsson, in ch. 91. GB pp. 13
Mr, MR Found in OW.Norse as Mr. From the OW.Norse mr "maiden". occurs in the runic accusative form mai. NR s.v. MR
Mfa   GB pp. 13
Magnhildr The first element Magn- or Mgin- is from OW.Norse magn "might, main, strength, power" or OW.Norse megin "might, main, strength, power," derived from Germanic *mazina-. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish as Magnhild and in OW.Norse as Magnhildr. These names appear to come from Germany. Found in the runic genitive form [ma(h)niltar]. NR s.v. Magnhildr, Magn-, -hildr
Mild   GB pp. 13
Mlfrr For the second element -frr see above. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Fra
Mallymkun Celtic name. It is uncertain whether this is a masculine name or a feminine name. The first element, Mal-, is the Celtic word for "servant". The second element is perhaps the genitive case of a Celtic name, Lomchu. Occurs in the runic nominative form mal:lymkun. NR s.v. Mallymkun
Mlmfrr For the second element -frr see above. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Fra
Malmury Celtic name. It is uncertain whether this is a masculine name or a feminine name. The first element, Mal-, is the Celtic word for "servant". The second element is the Celtic genitive-case form (possessive) of Maria. Occurs in the runic accusative form mal:mury NR s.v. Malmury
Manga Manga is a short form for Margrt. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Mardoll, Maroll Mardoll appears in the Eddas as one of the names of the goddess Freyja. The word is also used as a common noun meaning "mermaid". GB pp. 13; CV pp. 412 s.v. Mardoll
Margrt Christian, Margaret. A short form of this name in Old Norse is Manga. GB pp. 13; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Mra Christian, Mary, Maria GB pp. 13
Marna Christian GB pp. 13
Matthildr, Mattildr Christian name compounded from Matt- and -hildr. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Mva This name appears in Landnmabk for Mva rvarardttir in ch. 23. GB pp. 13
Melkorka Celtic. Melkorka appears as the slave-concubine of Hoskuldr Dala-Kollsson in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) who is said to be an Irish princess. This name appears in Landnmabk for Melkorka, daughter of the Irish king Mrkjartan in ch. 39. GB pp. 13
Mjaveig The first element Mja- comes from the stem of Old Icelandic mjodr, genitive mjaar, "mead, honey-wine". For the second element -veig see above. CV pp. 433, 690 s.v. mjodr, veig; NR s.v. -vig
Mjoll Identical with Old Icelandic mjoll, "fresh, powdery snow". This name appears in Landnmabk for Mjoll, daughter of n bogsveigir ("bow-swayer") in ch. 56. GB pp. 13; CV pp 433 s.v. mjoll
Mbil   GB pp. 13
Ma A short form of feminine names in -m. Occurs in Old Danish as Motha and is found in the runic nominative form mua. NR s.v. Ma
Meir For the second element -eir see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Meir, wife of Vestar Hngsson, in ch. 90; and Meir Hildisdttir in ch. 91. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247 s.v. heir
Molda   GB pp. 13
Mundgerr, Mundgera, Mundgrr, Mungrr The first element in this name is either Mun- or Mund-: both first elementes occur in Continental Germanic names. Names in Mun- are related to OW.Norse munr "mind, will." Names in Mund- are related to OW.Norse mund "hand; protection." Both first elementes are uncommon in Scandinavia; Mund- appears in OW.Norse Mundgerr or Mundgera and in Old Danish Munder. The first element Mun- appears only in the masculine name MunulfR. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. May occur in the runic nominative form [munkir]. NR s.v. Mun(d)grr, Mun-, Mund-, -grr
Myrgjol, Myrgjol Celtic name. Appears in the runic accusative form murkialu. This name appears in Landnmabk for Myrgjol, the daughter of the irish king Gljmalr in ch. 37. GB pp. 13; NR s.v. Myrgjol
Mrn Celtic. This name appears in Landnmabk for Mrn, daughter of the Irish king Maddar. GB pp. 13
 
N
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Name Notes Source
Nauma The name Nauma appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hlfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the wife of King Smingr. CV p. 146 s.v. nauma, naumr
Nereir For the second element -eir see above. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247 s.v. heir
Nibjorg For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Nibjorg, the daughter of King Bjlan and Kaln Gongu-Hrlfsdttir, in ch. 32. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjorg
 
O
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Name Notes Source
Oddbjorg The first element Odd- is identical with Old Icelandic oddr, "point, weapon-point, spear-point, arrow-point." For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Oddbjorg Grmsdttir in ch. 48. The name Oddbjorg appears in Hrafnkels saga freysgoa as the wife of Hrafnkel. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 66, 462 s.v. bjorg, oddr
Oddfrr For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -frr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Oddfrr, daughter of Helgi af Hvanneyri, in ch. 29. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. Fra
Oddgerr For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 197, 462 s.v. Gerr, oddr
Oddkatla For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -katla see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 337, 462 s.v. ketill, oddr
Oddlaug For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 374, 462 s.v. laug def. IV, oddr
Oddleif For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -leif or -lif see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 350; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Oddn For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -n see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Oddn Einarsdttir in ch. 73; Oddn, daughter of Oddr inn mjvi ("the slim") in chs. 92 and 94; Oddn daughter of rbjarnardttir in ch. 95. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. -n
in-Dsa This name is formed from the woman's name Dsa, first elemented with an OW.Norse by-name from the name of the god inn. Appears in the runic accusative form ointisu. NR s.v. in-Dsa, Dsa
laug The first element - is derived from the Primitive Scandinavian *Anu-, from *anuR "forefather, ancestor". For the second element -laug see above. May occur in the runic accusative form [oloh]. NR s.v. laug, -, -laug
leif, lif A feminine variant of the masculine name leifR or lifR, which is a side-form of lafR. Runic examples include the nominative form [ulef] and the accusative forms olaif, [ulaif]. NR s.v. lif, lifR, lafR
Olhildr The first element Ol- is identical with Old Icelandic ol, "ale". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 763 s.v. hildr, ol
lof This is a more modern spelling of the Old Norse name lof, the feminine form of lfr. Occurs in Old Danish as Olof, in Old Swedish as Olaf or Olof, and in OW.Norse as lof. Runic examples include the nominative forms olauf, [olauf], uluf, the genitive forms auluafaR, ulaufR and the accusative forms olaf, [oloh], oluf, ulafu. This name appears twice in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): lof Gumundardttir, granddaughter of lfr pi ("peacock"); and lof rsteinnsdttir, the granddaughter of Unn in djpga ("the deep-minded"). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 471 s.v. lfr; NR s.v. lof, lafR
Olrn For the first element Ol- see above. For the second element -rn see above. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. CV pp. 504, 763 s.v. rn, ol; NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
Ondtt Probably originally a by-name from the Old Icelandic adjective ondttr, "looking full in the face, fiery-eyed". This name appears in Landnmabk for Ondttr, sister of Olvir barnakarl ("friend of children") in chs. 32, 40, and 63. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 764 s.v. ondttr
Ormhildr The first element Orm- is identical with Old Icelandic ormr, "serpent, snake, dragon." For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Ormhildur Hrarsdttir in ch. 85. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 468-469 s.v. hildr, ormr
sk Identical with Old Icelandic sk, "wish", the proper name is found in Landnmabk. Related to one of the names of the god inn, ski, and to a common epithet for the Valkyries, sk-mr or "wish-maiden". In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) this name appears both for sk, the mother of rsteinn surts inn spaka (Thrsteinn Black the Wise) and granddaughter of Unn in djpga ("the deep-minded"), and also for sk the daughter of rsteinn surts inn spaka. These same characters also appear in Landnmabk in chs. 33, 39 and 44. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 473 s.v. sk, ski, sk-mr
tama Probably originally a by-name. From the OW.Norse adjective tamr "untamed". Appears in the runic nominative form [utaRa]. NR s.v.
Otkatla See -katla, above. This name appears in Landnmabk for Otkatla rardttir in ch. 48. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
  
R
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Name Notes Source
Rhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian palce-name Rathildayle (c. 1100-1200's). The first element R- is identical with Old Icelandic r, "counsel, advice, rede". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 209, 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 485 s.v. hildr, r
Rafarta, Raforta Celtic GB pp. 14
Rafnhildr, Hrafnhildr For the first element Rafn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A few instances of this name are recorded in West Scandinavia. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Rauenhilbanc (c. 1209), Rauenylridding (c. 1320). FJ pp. 212, 349; CV pp. 261, 281 s.v. hildr, hrafn
Ragna A short form of feminine names in Ragn-. Appears in Old Danish as Regna, and in Old Swedish and OW.Norse as Ragna. Runic examples include the nominative forms ragna, rakn, rakna, [rana]. Ragna appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as a woman of distinction, the mistress of a farm on North Ronaldsay. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. Ragna, Ragn-
RagnalfR The first element Ragn- is related to Germanic *razina-, in Gothic ragin "counsel, decision", OW.Norse rogn, regin n. pl. "power, power of the gods". As a personal name element this word has the Germanic sense of "rede, counsel, decision", but in Scandinavia acquired a secondary meaning with the religious interpretation. May derive from either Germanic *ragn or the side-formen *rgin. For the second element -lfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnlf. Runic examples include the nominative form raknilfR,/EM> and the accusative form rahnilfi. NR s.v. RagnlfR, Ragn-, AlfR, -alfR, -lfR
Ragnbjorg For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -bjorg or -borg see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnborgh and in OW.Norse as Ragnbjorg. Occurs in the runic nominative form r-knburk. NR s.v. Ragnborg, Ragn-, -biorg/-borg
Ragnfrr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Danish as Ragnfrith, in Old Swedish as Ragnfridh, and in OW.Norse as Ragnfrr. Runic examples include the nominative forms ragnfriR, rahnfri, ra(h)nfrir, [rahnfrir], the genitive forms rahnfri, raknfriarrahnfrii. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. Ragnfrr, Ragn-, -frr, Fra
Ragnheir, Ragneir For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -eir see above. A short form of Ragneir is Ranka. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 247, 488-489 s.v. heir, regin
Ragnhildr, Ragnhilda For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish as Regnhild, in Old Swedish as Ragnhild or Ragnhilda, and in OW.Norse as Ragnhildr. The name Ragnhildr is common in Norway from the 800's onwards and is occasionally found in Iceland as well. The form Ragnhilda is common in Norway in the 1300-1400's. Frequently found in Sweden. Danish has Rgnhildr, which probably represents a loan from the Continental Germanic name Reinildis. Runic examples include the nominative forms rahniltr, rahn[ilt]r, raknhiltr and the genitive form rag[niltaR]. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Ragenilda (c. 1180-1204), Raenild (1185), Regenild (1202), Raginalda (c. 1220), Ragenil (c. 1230), Ragnilda (c. 1149-1181), Raganild (c. 1149-1181), Raganildis (c. 1149-1181), Ragnilde (c. 1149-1181) etc. Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) gives this as the name of one of the daughters of the Norwegian king Eirkr blx ("blood-ax"). A short form of Ragnhildr is Ranka. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 213-214, 345, 349; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 261, 488-489 s.v. hildr, regin; NR s.v. Ragnhildr, Ragn-, -hildr
Ragnv For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnvi. Occurs in the runic accusative form ragnui. NR s.v. Ragnv, Ragn-, v
Rannveig, Rognveig For the first element Ragn- see above. Found in OW.Norse as Rannveig, Rognveig. Runic examples are found in the nominative forms ranuaik, ranuauk and ronuig. NR s.v. Ragnvig/Rannvig, Ragn-, -vig
Ragnvor For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -vor see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form rahnuor. NR s.v. Ragnvor, Ragn-, -vor
Ragnrr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -rr see above. Found in the runic nominative form raknrur. NR s.v. Ragnrr, Ragn-, -rr
Rakel Christian, Rachel. While Geirr Bassi shows this in his list of Old Norse names, it is quite a bit after the end of the Viking Age. Lind shows it in use no sooner than 1229 for Rachel cona Mass kumbalda and appearing as a matronymic byname for ordur Rachelarson (c. 1397). GB pp. 14; Lind, E.H. Norsk-Islndska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn frn Medeltiden (Uppsala & Leipzig: 1905-1915, sup. Oslo, Uppsala and Kobenhavn: 1931). Col. 844 S.n. Rakel.
Randaln Christian GB pp. 14
Randv The first element Rand- is from OW.Norse rond "shield." For the second element -v or -v see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms ranti, ronti and the accusative forms rantui, [rantui]. NR s.v. Randv, Rand-, -v
Ranka Ranka is used as a short form for the names Ragneir and Ragnhildr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Rannveig The first element Rann- is identical to Old Icelandic rann, "house" (related to the root in modern English ransack, "house-search"). For the second element -veig see above. The name Rannveig appears in Vpnfiringa saga as the daughter of Ltingr sbjarnarson. Another Rannveig appears in rsteins ttr stangarhoggs as the wife of Vga-Bjarni ("Killer-Bjarni"). GB pp. 14; CV pp. 483, 690 s.v. rann, veig; NR s.v. -vig
Reginleif The first element Regin- is identical to Old Icelandic regin, "ruling powers, the gods." For the second element -leif or -lif see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345, 350; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
Rkulta Originally a by-name meaning "the proud one". A single instance of this is found as a by-name in West Scandinavia in the 800's. See also the name Rkilt in Jarlmanns saga ok Hermanns. May occur in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Rikelot (1202). FJ pp. 218
Rkv The first element Rk- is from the OW.Norse adjective rkr and the Germanic *rkia-, "mighty, distinguished, rich". For the second element -v or -v see above. May occur in the runic nominative form rikui. NR s.v. Rkv, Rk-, -v
Rjpa Although Geirr Bassi Haraldsson identifies this as a proper name, the word is the noun rjpa, "ptarmigan", and is used in Landnmabk as a woman's nick-name, not a proper name. GB pp. 14; CV pp. 501 s.v. rjpa
Rta Occurs in OW.Norse as the mythological name Rta, from the OW.Norse verb rta "to stir, overturn, tear; bring disorder". This name also is found in a runic inscription in the nominative form rota. NR s.v. Rta
Rna Short form of feminine names in Rn- or -rn. Found in Old Swedish as Runa and in OW.Norse for a mythological character. Runic examples include the nominative forms runa, [runa], runo and the accusative form runu. NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
Rnfrr The first element Rn- is from OW.Norse rn, which is derived from Germanic *rn in the original sense of "secret, hidden knowledge". For the second element -frr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form runfri. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Rnfrr, Rn-, -frr, Fra

S
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Name Notes Source
Salbjorg The first element Sal- is identical with Old Icelandic salr, "hall, house". For the second element -bjorg see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 66, 510 s.v. bjorg, salr
Salds For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -ds see above. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 510 s.v. ds, salr
Salgerr For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346, 349; CV pp. 197, 510 s.v. Gerr, salr
Salvor For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -vor see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346, 351-352; CV pp. 510 s.v. salr; NR s.v. -vor
Shildr The first element S- is identical to Old Icelandic sr, "sea". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346, 349; CV pp. 261, 618 s.v. hildr, sr
Sur, Sunn For the first element S- see above. For the second element second element -unnr or the older form -ur see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 618 s.v. sr, unnr
Sandey The first element Sand- is from OW.Norse sandr "sand". For the second element -ey or -y see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form santau. NR s.v. Sandy, Sand-, y
Ssgerr This name is a variant form of sgerr (sgrr, sgerr, sgrr). The origin of the initial S-sound is perhaps from children's speech. occurs in the runic nominative form soskirir. NR s.v. Ssgrr, s-/sgrr, -grr
Sefa This is the feminine equivalent to the masculine names Sefi or Siafi, which are from the Old Swedish adjectives siver, sver "calm, self-possessed, tranquil, gentle, leisurely". Runic examples include the nominative form sifa and the genitive form sifuR. NR s.v. Sefa, Sefi/Siafi
Sesilda Christian, Cecily GB pp. 14
Sibba Sibba is a short form of the name Sigbjorg, Sigbiorg. Occurs in the runic genitive form sibu. NR s.v. Sibba
Sa Probably originally a by-name, this name is derived from OW.Norse sa "side". A runic example occurs in the genitive case as s(in)-u. NR s.v. Sa
Sigbjorg The first element Sig- comes from OW.Norse sigr (Genitive: sigrs), which is derived from Germanic *seziz, *sezuz, "victory, conquest". For the second element -bjorg see above. Found in Old Danish as Sighburgh, in Old Swedish as Sighborgh and in OW.Norse as Sigbjorg. Occurs in the runic nominative form sigbiurg. A short form of Sigbjorg is Sibba. NR s.v. Sigbiorg, Sig-, -biorg/-borg
Sigga A short form for women's names in Sig-. A few instances of this name are found in Norway and it appears in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Sige (pre-1195), Sigga (pre-1195 to 1202). FJ pp. 231, 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr
Siggunnr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form shunar. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Siggunnr, Sig-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
Siglaug For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Sighlgh. Occurs in the runic nominative forms sihlauh and siklaug. NR s.v. Siglaug, Sig-, -laug
Sign For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -n see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Sighni, in Old Swedish as Sighne and in OW.Norse as Sign. Found in the runic nominative form sikni. Cleasby-Vigfusson states that this name found in Landnmabk comes from the name of the goddess Sigyn, the wife of Loki. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr, Sigyn; NR s.v. Sign, Sig-, -n
Sigrr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element comes from -frr, see above. This name was very common in Norway and Iceland through the whole medieval period. Also common in Sweden and frequent in Denmark. Found in Old Danish as Sighrith, in Old Swedish as Sighfridh or Sighridh and in OW.Norse as Sigrr. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as sikriR, sikri, si[k]rir, si[kr]ir, siri, siri(), [siri], [siri()], sirir, siri..., the genitive case forms siriaR, siraR and the accusative case forms [sifri], siri(in)R. Anglo-Scandinavian forms may include Sigreth (1143-1147), Sirid (1185), Sigherith (c. 1200), Sigerith (c. early 1200's), Sigrida (1202), Sigerithe (c. 1200-1254), Syrith (1245), Sigreda, Segrida etc. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga This name appears in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, as Sigrr Sigursdttir, who married rlfr Kveldulfsson. Sigrr, wife of rsteinn of Lysufjord, appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 234-235, 346, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr; NR s.v. Sigrr, Sig-, -frr, Fra
Sigrlaug For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -laug see above. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 374, 527-528 s.v. laug def. IV, sigr
Sigrn For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -rn see above. Found in Old Swedish as Sighrun and in OW.Norse as Sigrn. Occurs in the runic nominative form sirun and the accusative form sikrun. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 504, 527-528 s.v. rn, sigr; NR s.v. Sigrn, Sig-, -rn
Sigunnr For the first element Sig- see above. Found in the runic genitive case form shunar. NR s.v. Sigunnr, Sig-, -unnr/-ur
Sigveig For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -veig or -vig see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigveig. Occurs in the runic nominative form sikuik. NR s.v. Sigvig, Sig-, -vig
Sigvor For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -vor see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigvor. Occurs in the runic genitive form skuaraR. NR s.v. Sigvor, Sig-, -vor
Sigrr, Sigrr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -rr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigrr. Runic examples include the nominative forms sigru and sikrur. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. A short form for names in -ra is ra. A short form for Sigrr is Sissa. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV p. 527-528, 747 s.v. sigr, rr, ra; NR s.v. Sig()rr, Sig-, -rr
Sissa Sissa is a short-form for the name Sigrr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Sklphna The first element possibly comes from Old Icelandic sklp, which is literally "scullery-water, dish-water" but which metaphorically is applied to gossip, i.e., the kind of talk women do while scrubbing. The second element is identical with Old Icelandic hna, "hen". The name is found in Landnmabk, and I think is likely to have started out as a nickname. CV pp. 305, 542 s.v. hna, sklp
Skrlaug The first element Skr- is from the OW.Norse adjective skrr "clean, pure, clear, bright". This first element does not appear to originate as a Scandinavian name element, but rather is an import from either OH.Germ. or Old English. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form [skirlauh]. NR s.v. Skrlaug, Skr-, -laug
Skjaldfrr This is a hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Scelfride, Sceldfrithe (c. 1100-1400's). The first element Skjald- is identical with Old Icelandic skjold, genitive skjaldar, "shield." For the second element -frr see above. A short-form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. FJ pp. 250, 346, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 553 s.v. skjold; NR s.v. , Fra
Skjaldvor For the first element Skjald- see above. For the second element -vor see above. A number of instances of this name are recorded in Norway. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Scelduuare, Seldwar (c. 1200-1330). GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 250, 346, 351-352; CV pp. 553 s.v. skjold; NR s.v. -vor
Snlaug, Snjlaug, Snilaug The first element Sn- is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *snaiwaR, related to Old Icelandic snr, "snow". There are several forms of the word, including snr, snjr, and snjr. Most proper names are compounded in the oldest form of snr, however this name is also found with the later spelling Snjlaug, Snilaug. For the second element -laug see above. Found in OW.Norse as Snlaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form sniolauk. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 374, 577 s.v. laug def. IV, snr; NR s.v. Snilaug, Sni-/Sny-, -laug
Snotra Snotra is the name of one of the goddesses mentioned in Gylfaginning in The Prose Edda, where she is named as the thirteenth among the synjur or goddesses: "She is wise and courteous. From her name a woman or a man who is a wise person is called snotr". The name Snotra also appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family - the saga says she is called Snotra because she is the brightest. All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjotra, Hjotra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV p. 576 s.v. snotr, Snotra
Solva   GB pp. 15
Slveig, Solveig The first element Sl- is perhaps from Old Norse sl, "the sun", or from solr, "sun-colored, yellow, sallow". For the second element -veig see above. GB pp. 14; CV pp. 579, 621, 690 s.v. sl, solr, veig; NR s.v. -vig
Slvor, Solvor For the first element Sl-, Sol- see above. For the second element -vor see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 351-352; CV pp. 579, 621 s.v. sl, solr; NR s.v. -vor
Sma Feminine name from OW.Norse smi "honor, respect." occurs in the runic accusative form somu. NR s.v. Sma
Svor The first element S- or Sy- is from OW.Norse sjr, sjr, sr which are derived from Primitive Scandinavian *saiwaR, "sea, ocean". Found in the runic genitive form saufaraR. For the second element -vor see above. NR s.v. Syvor, S-/Sy-, -vor
Spana Possibly related to Old Icelandic spana, "to provoke, to allure". GB pp. 14; CV pp. 580, 582 s.v. spana, spenja
Stafnhildr, Stafnhilda Hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly found in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Stauenilde (c. 1200). The first element Stafn- is related to Old Icelandic stafn, "the stem of a ship, prow". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 262, 346, 349; CV pp. 261, 586 s.v. hildr, stafn
Steina, Stina Appears in Old Swedish as Stena. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stin-. Occurs in the runic accusative form steinu. NR s.v. Stina, Stin-
Steinbjorg The first element Stein- is identical with Old Icelandic steinn, "a stone". For the second element -bjorg or -borg see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenborgh and in OW.Norse as Steinbjorg. Runic examples include the nominative forms stainbog, [stainbro], [stinburk]. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stin- is Steina, Stina. NR s.v. Stinborg, Stin-, -biorg/-borg
Steinfrr, Steinrr For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenfridh and in OW.Norse as Steinfrr or Steinrr. Runic examples include the nominative forms stinfrir, stnfri, st[yn]fri and the accusative form stanfrii. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stin- is Steina, Stina. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Stinfrr, Stin-, -frr, Fra
Steinhildr For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenhild. Runic examples include the nominative case forms steniltr, stineltr, stniltr. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stin- is Steina, Stina. NR s.v. Stinhildr, Stin-, -hildr
Steinlaug For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form steinlauk. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stin- is Steina, Stina. NR s.v. Stinlaug, Stin-, -laug
Steinnvor, Steinvor, Steinor For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -vor see above. This name is common in both Norway and in Iceland, often in the form Steinor. Steinvor hfgyja ("temple-priestess"), a relative of Brodd-Helgi ("Spike-Helgi"), appears in Vpnfiringa saga. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 265, 346, 351-352; CV pp. 591 s.v. steinn; NR s.v. -vor
Steinunn, Steinur For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element second element -unnr or the older form -ur see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 591, 655 s.v. steinn, unnr
Stynfrr The name-element Styn- (perhaps from OW.Norse stynr "groan") is not well-known except in this name and in the masculine name Stynbjorn. For the second element -frr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form st[yn]fri. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Stynfrr, -frr, Fra
Sunnifa This is a Scandinavianized form of Old English Sunngifu. Legend has it that this was the name of an Irish Christian queen who fled to Norway, where she died. The name is common in Norway in the 1200's. The name is found, but very infrequently, in Iceland, Sweden, and Denmark. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 271-272
Svala This name is taken from the bird, "swallow". May occur in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Swale (1185). Found as a woman's proper name in Bandamanna saga. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 273; CV pp. 606 s.v. svala
Svana This name is related to Old Icelandic svanr, "swan" and possibly also to Old Icelandic svanni, a poetic word used to mean "lady". GB pp. 15; CV pp. 606 s.v. svanr, svanni
Svanhildr For the first element Svan- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 606 s.v. hildr, svanr, svanni
Svanlaug For the first element Svan- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 374, 606 s.v. laug def. IV, svanr, svanni
Sveina Found in Old Swedish as Svena. A short form of feminine names in Svein-, Svin-. The first element Svein- or Svin- is from OW.Norse sveinn "youth, young person, young man." Occurs in the runic nominative form suina. NR s.v. Svina, Svin-
Sveinheir For the first element Svein- or Svin- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Found in the runic nominative form [sueini]. A short form of feminine names in Svein-, Svin- Sveina or Svina. NR s.v. Svin-, -hir
Svnhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation, possibly found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Suinild, Swynild (c. 1220-1234). The first element Svn- is identical with Old Icelandic svn, "swine, pig". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 283, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Sylgja The name Sylgja appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the name of Herrau's mother. It is possibly identical with the Old Icelandic sylgja, "brooch". CV pp. 614 s.v. sylgja
Systa This name is derived from OW.Norse systir "sister." Found in the runic accusative form systu. NR s.v. Systa

T
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Name Notes Source
Tfrr Found in Old Swedish as Tifridh. The first element T- is from OW.Norse t "time", often found as the first element T- in Old West Norse names. A related term corresponding to this name element seems not to exist in Continental Germanic but is common in Old English. For the second element -frr see above. Runic examples include the nominative form [tifr]i and the accusative form [tifrit]. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Tfrr, -frr, Fra
Tobba Tobba is a short-form for the name rbjorg. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Tfa Found in Old Danish as Tova, in Old Swedish as Tova and in Old West Norse as Tfa. Frequent in both Old Danish and Old Swedish. This name is found as a short form of names such as rfrr. Cleasby-Vigfusson states that this name is related to German zbe, "a handmaiden". Runic examples include the nominative forms tufa, tuf(a), (t)ufa, [tufa] and the accusative forms tufu, [tofu]. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 638 s.v. Tfa, NR s.v. Tfa
Tka Found in Old Danish as Toka, may occur in Old West Norse as Tka. This name is the feminine equivalent to the masculine name Tki, which is a short form of rkell, rketill or may also represent a compund with the second element -ki added to names in r-/r- (r-). The feminine name Tka is also found as a short form of OW.Norse rkatla. Runic examples include the nominative case [tuka] and the accusative case toku. NR s.v. Tka
Tla Found in Old Danish as Tola, in Old Swedish as Tola, and appears as in OW.Norse as a fictional character, Tolla. This usually occurs as an East Scandinavian name, and is found frequently in Danish. Tla is a short form of names in rl- such as rlaug or rlof. Runic examples include the nominative forms tola, tula, [tula], [tul(a)]. FJ pp. 288; NR s.v. Tla
Tonna This name is a short form of the woman's name rn. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Tonna. Also found as an Anglo-Scandinavian name (ca. 1220-1225). Runic examples include the nominative form tuna and the accusative forms [(t)on(o)], ton(u). FJ pp. 288; NR s.v. Tonna
Tra This name is a short form of feminine names in r-/r-. Occurs in the runic nominative forms [tora] and tura. NR s.v. Tra, r-/r-
Torfa Proper name from Landnmabk. Perhaps related to Old Icelandic torf, "turf, sod". CV pp. 636-637 s.v. torf, Torfa
Totra Snotra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of the mother of a ridiculously ignorant family - the saga says she is called Totra because she would not wear any clothes which were not in tatters. The name is related to Old Icelandic tta, "to tear to shreds" and ttingr, "tatters, shreds". All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjotra, Hjotra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV p. 647 s.v. tta, ttingr

U
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Name Notes Source
Ur, Unnr, Aur Appears as a feminine proper name in Landnmabk and Laxdla saga. Ur is an older form of this word. The three forms of the name are used interchangably, for instance Aur in djpauga ("the deep-minded") is called Aur in Landnmabk, but Unnr or Ur in Laxdla saga. The name Unn appears in the legendary late 13th century Gautreks saga as the mother of Starkar. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 648, 655 s.v. Ur, unnr
lfeir, lfheir The first element lf- is identical to Old Icelandic lfr, "wolf". For the second element -eir see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 247, 668 s.v. heir, lfr
lfhildr For the first element lf- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Ulfhild, and in OW.Norse as lfhildr. Occurs in the runic nominative form [olfil](r). FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 668 s.v. hildr, lfr; NR s.v. lfhildr, Ulf-, -hildr
lfrn For the first element lf- see above. For the second element -rn see above. A short form of names in Rn- or -rn is Runa. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rn; NR s.v. Rna, Rn-, -rn
Una, Unna Found in Old Danish as Una, and in in Old Swedish and OW.Norse as Una, Unna. The runic examples should be interpreted as Una, from the OW.Norse verb una "to enjoy, be happy with, be content". Runic examples include the nominative form una and the accusative form unu. GB pp. 15; NR s.v. Una/Unna
Undrlaug The first element is from OW.Norse undr "under". A correspondence to this name element seems not to exist in the Germanic languages. Since there is no evidence that a simple name *Laug existed, the first element cannot reasonably be interpreted as a first elemented by-name. For the second element -laug see above. Runic examples include the nominative form untrlauh and the genitive form utrlaukar. CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV; NR s.v. Undrlaug, -laug
Unnr Found in OW.Norse as Unnr. From Old West Norse unnr "to wave, billow, roll, undulate" or identical to the second element -unnr/-ur. A runic example may occur in the runic nominative form u=n/n=u. NR s.v. Unnr, -unnr/-ur
rsla Christian, Ursula GB pp. 15

V
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Name Notes Source
Vtildr, Vethildr In Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, the Vinland explorers capture two skrling boys, who reveal their mother's name to be Vtildr or Vethildr. This would, if correct, have to be a Norse understanding and rendering of an Algonquin or Beothuk name.  
Valds The first element Val- is of uncertain origin. It may come from Primitive Germanic *walha-, meaning "Celtic, Welsh, foreign" or Primitive Germanic *wala-, Old Icelandic valr "the dead on a battlefield" as found in the word valkyrja. For the second element -ds see above. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 675, 676 s.v. ds, Valir, valr
Valgerr For the first element Val- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. A short form of Valgerr is Valka. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 197, 675, 676 s.v. Gerr, Valir, valr
Valka Valka is a short form for Valgerr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
ValfR The first element V- is identical with Old Icelandic v, "temple, sanctuary" and related to Gothic weihs, "holy". For the second element -lfR see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form uielf/uielf=r. NR s.v. VlfR, VlfR; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vbjorg For the first element V- see above. For the second element -bjorg, -borg see above.Found in Old Danish as Wiburgh, in Old Swedish as Viborgh, and in OW.Norse as a fictional character Vbjorg. Runic examples include the nominative forms uibug, uiburk and the accusative forms uiborg, uibruk. NR s.v. Vborg, V-, -biorg/-borg; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vds For the first element V- see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name is found in Landnmabk, of a woman with family members with names in the same first element: Vgestr and Vmundr. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 687 s.v. ds, v
Vefrr For the first element V- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Danish as Wifrith and in OW.Norse as Vfrr. Runic examples include the nominative forms uifir, uifiriR, uifri, uifrir and the genitive form uifraR. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. Vfrr, V-, -frr; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vgunnr For the first element V- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms uikuntr, uikur, uiku.... A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Vgur/-gundr, V-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vgerr For the first element V- see above. For the second element -grr or -gerr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Vigrdh and in OW.Norse as Vgerr. Runic examples include the nominative forms uiker, uikr and the genitive form uikeraR. NR s.v. Vgrr, V-, -grr; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vlaug For the first element V- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 374, 687 s.v. laug def. IV, v
Vn For the first element V- see above. For the second element -n see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 687 s.v. v; NR s.v. -n
Vreir For the first element V-, V- see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vrn For the first element V-, V- see above. For the second element -rn see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form uerun. NR s.v. Vrn, V-, -rn; CV pp. 687 s.v. v
Vgds The first element Vg- is identical to Old Icelandic vg, "battle, strife". For the second element -ds see above. Appears as both the name of a human woman in Landnmabk and as the name of one of the valkyries. In Laxdla saga (c. 1245) Vgds Hallsteinsdttir is the wife of Vga-Hrappr ("Killer-Hrappr"), while Vgds Ingjaldsdttir is the granddaughter of lfr feilan ("wolf-cub") and wife of rr goddi. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 715 s.v. ds, vg
Vilborg The first element Vil- is identical to Old Icelandic vil, "will, liking, favor". For the second element -borg see above. GB pp. 16; CV pp. 66, 705 s.v. bjorg, vil
Vilgerr For the first element Vil- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 705 s.v. Gerr, vil
  
y
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Name Notes Source
Ynghildr, Yngvildr The first element Yng- or Yngv- is probably related to the name Yngvi-Freyr, the founder of the Yngling line (Ynglingasaga), and may be related to names for the god Freyr. For the second element -hildr see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h see above. Yngvildr, a descendant of Karlsefni and mother of Bishop Brandr is mentioned in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, and in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395). GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 726 s.v. hildr, Yngvi, Yngvi-Freyr
Yngvoldr For the first element Yng- see above. Yngvoldr appears as a woman's name in Landnmabk. CV pp. 726 s.v. Yngvi, Yngvi-Freyr
Yrsa, ri, rr   GB pp. 16
 
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Name Notes Source
jbjorg Found in Old West Norse as jbjorg or ibiorg. The first element j-, i- is from OW.Norse j "folk, people". For the second element -bjorg see above. Runic examples include the nominative form iuburh and the accusative form [iauburi-]. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 66, 739 s.v. bjorg, j; NR s.v. iborg, i-, -biorg/-borg
jgerr For the first element j- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 197, 739 s.v. Gerr, j; NR s.v. i-
jheir For the first element j-, i- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form iureir. NR s.v. ihir, i-, -hir
jhildr For the first element j- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name is found in Landnmabk. In Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, and in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395), jhildr is the name of Eirk's wife, who was famous for her early conversion to Christianity and for building the first church in Greenland. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 739 s.v. hildr, j; NR s.v. i-
jv For the second element -v or -v see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms iauui, iauui(r). NR s.v. iv, i-, -v
ra The feminine uncompounded form of the Old Icelandic name element ra-, from rr, god of thunder. ra appears also as a short form of names in r-. Common in both Norway and in Iceland from the earliest times onward, also frequent in Swedish and Danish. Found in Old Danish as Thora, Thura, in Old Swedish as Thora, and in OW.Norse as ra. Runic exampls include the nominative forms ora, [ora], ura, [ura], the genitive forms [oru], ru, uru and the accusative forms oru, uru. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) ra Sumarliisdttir appears as the wife of Earl Erlend and the mother of St. Magnus. ra borgarhjortr ("town-hart") appears in the legendary saga Bsa saga og Herraus, c. 1300, as the wife of Ragnar Lobrokkr. Another ra appears in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, ra hlahond ("lace-cuff"), who eloped with Bjorn Bjarnarsson. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr; NR s.v. ra
rarna The first element r- is identical to the Old Icelandic rr, the god of thunder. In modern usage the vowel is long (r-) before vowels h or d, but short (or-) before consonants, however it is thought that the long vowel occurred always during the Viking Age. The second element -arna is either from arinn, "hearth" or more likely from arin, related to Old Icelandic orn, "eagle". A few instances are recorded in Norway, one in the 800s, and the name is frequent in Iceland, though it is not found in East Scandinavia. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 300, 347, 348; CV pp. 743, 767 s.v. rr, orn
rbjorg For the first element r- see above. For the second element -bjorg see above. This name appears twice in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): rbjorg, the daughter of rmr and the second wife of Hrtr Herjlfsson; and rbjorg digra ("stout"), daughter of lfr pi ("peacock"). In Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, rbjorg knarrarbringa ("ship-breasted") is the mother of jhildr, the wife of Eirkr raur ("the red"); rbjorg ltilvolva ("little prophetess") also appears in the saga as an itenerant sybil. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. A short form of rbjorg is Tobba. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 66, 743 s.v. bjorg, rr
rds For the first element r- see above. For the second element -ds see above. This name appears three times in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): rds lfsdttir, daughter of lfr feilan ("wolf-cub") and wife of rarinn; rds Snorradttir, daughter of Snorri goa ("priest") and wife of Bolli Bollasson; and rds jlfsdttir, wife of svfr Helgason and mother of Gudrun. The name rds appears in Vpnfiringa saga as the wife of Ltingr sbjarnarson, and also the wife of Helgi sbjarnarson. Another rds is mentioned in Hrafnkels saga freysgoa and in Egils saga Skallagrmssonar (c. 1230), the daughter of rolfr Skallagrmsson. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. A short-form for names in -ds is Dsa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 743 s.v. ds, rr
relfr For the first element r- see above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
rey For the first element r- see above. For the second element -ey or -y see above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 134, 743 s.v. ey, rr
rfinna For the first element r- see above. For the second element -finna see above. Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as rfinna Vermundardttir, grandaughter of lfr pi ("peacock") and wife of rsteinn Kuggason. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 348; CV pp. 154, 743 s.v. finnr, rr
rfra For the first element r- see above. The second element -fra is the weak side-form of -frr, see above. Occurs as a Scandinavian name in England. Found in the runic nominative form urfi(r)ia. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. rfra, r-/r-, -frr, Fra
rfrr, rr For the first element r- see above. For the second element -frr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorfred, Thorith, found in OW.Norse as rr. Runic examples include the nominative forms erir, [urfrikr], urfri, urfrir, uri, found in the case as urufirii and in the accusative case as ou(r)rii. A short form of rfrr is Tfa. A short form of names in Fr-, -frr is Fra. NR s.v. rfrr/rr, r-/r-, -frr, Fra
rgerr For the first element r- see above. For the second element -gerr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorgard, in Old Swedish as Thorgrdh and in OW.Norse as rgerr. Runic examples include the nominative forms orker, orkir, ukir, urkair|, urkarr, urkir, the genitive forms [orkera], orkeraR, [o]r[*kiai]r[in] and the accusative forms urkiri, ur*kiru. Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) twice: rgerr the daughter of Egill Skallagrmsson and wife of lfr pi ("peacock"); and rgerr rsteinnsdttir, daughter of rsteinn raua ("the red"), wife of first Dala-Kollr, then Herjlfr, and mother of Hoskuldr Dala-Kollsson and Hrtr Herjlfsson. A woman called rgerr silfra ("the silver") appears in Vpnfiringa saga. Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu and Egils saga Skallagrmssonar, c. 1230, mention rgerr Egilsdttir, child of the famous Egill Skallagrmsson and sister to rsteinn Egilsson. rgerr, the wife of Herjlfr Bardarson and mother of Bjarni Herjlfsson appears in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395). A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 197, 743 s.v. rr, Gerr; NR s.v. rgrr, r-/r-, -grr
rgrma For the first element r- see above. For the second element -grma see above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 216, 743 s.v. grma, rr
rgunnr For the first element r- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorgun, Thrugun, in Old Swedish as Thorgun, and in OW.Norse as rgunnr. Runic examples include the nominative orgun, orkun, ()(o)rkur, urgutr, urkun, urkunr, urkuntr, urkutr, urkutru, [urkur] and the dative form urkuni. rgunna, a woman from the Hebridies, appears in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, as the mother of Leifr Eirksson's illigitimate son rgils, and it is suggested that she is the same rgunna who appears in Eyrbyggja saga, though the chronology between the two sagas cannot be reconciled. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-gur/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 221, 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr, gunnr; NR s.v. rgunnr/-gur/-gundr, r-/r-, -gunnr/-gur/-gundr, Gunna
rhalla For the first element r- see above. The second element -halla is identical to Old Icelandic hallr, "flat stone, big stone, boulder". Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as rhalla in mlga ("the gossip"), a servant on the farm of svfr Helgason. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 344, 347; CV pp. 235, 743 s.v. rr, hallr
rheir For the first element r- see above. For the second element -heir or -hir see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form urei. NR s.v. rhir, r-/r-, -hir
rhildr, rhilda For the first element r- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Several instances of this name are recorded in Iceland from the time of the Landnm, which indicates that the name must have been known in Norway as well, though it is not recorded there. It is also found in Sweden and Denmark. Found in Old Danish as Thorhild and in OW.Norse as rhildr. May occur in the runic nominative forms [oril], oril-. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Durildewell (c. 1205). A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 307, 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 743 s.v. rr, hildr; NR s.v. rhildr, r-/r-, -hildr
rkatla For the first element r- see above. See -katla, above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. A short form of rkatla is Tka. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 337, 743 s.v. rr, ketill; NR s.v. Tka
rlaug For the first element r- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Several insteances of this name are found in Iceland, but after the 900s the name does not appear in Norway again until the 1400s. A few insteances are recorded in Sweden as Thorlgh. A short form of names in rl- is Tla, while a short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 311, 347; CV pp. 374, 743 s.v. rr, laug def. IV
rleif For the first element r- see above. For the second element -leif or -lif see above. A short form of names in rl- is Tla, while a short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 347, 350; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr; NR s.v. -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
rljt For the first element r- see above. For the second element -ljtr see above. A short form of names in rl- is Tla, while a short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 347, 350; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
rlof For the first element r- see above. For the second element -leif, -lif, -lof see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Thorlof. Occurs in the runic nominative form urluf. NR s.v. rlof, r-/r-, -lif/-lof, -lifR/-lafR
rn For the first element r- see above. For the second element -n see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form urni. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. A short form of rn is Tonna GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; NR s.v. rn, r-/r-, -n, Tonna
rodda For the first element r- see above. The second element -odda is identical to Old Icelandic oddr, "point, weapon-point, spear-point, arrow-point." A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 345, 347, 350; CV pp. 462, 743 s.v. oddr, rr
runn For the first element r- see above. For the second element -unn see above. Found in Old Danish Thorun, in Old Swedish Thorun and in OW.Norse runnr. Runic examples include the nominative forms orun, orur, urun, urunr, urur and the genitive form urunaR. Appears in Laxdla saga (c. 1245) as runn hyrna ("horn"), daughter of Ketill flatnefr ("flat-nose") and wife of Helgi inn magri ("the lean"). Two other women named runn appear in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, and in Grnlendinga saga (1382-1395), one as the descendant of Karlsefni and mother of Bishop Bjorn, the other as Karlsefni's mother. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 655, 743 s.v. unnr, rr; NR s.v. runnr/-ur, r-/r-, -unnr/-ur
rv, ri, rv, rv For the first element r- see above. For the second element -v or -v see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorwe, Thyrwi and in OW.Norse as orv, yri. Runic examples include the nominative forms erui, irui, uri, urui, [yrui], the genitive form uruiaR and the accusative forms ourui, urui. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 687, 743 s.v. v, rr; NR s.v. rv/rvi, r-/r-, -v
rveig See r- above. For the second element -veig see above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 690, 743 s.v. veig, rr; NR s.v. -vig
rvia For the first element r- see above. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
rvor For the first element r- see above. For the second element -vor see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorwar and in OW.Norse as rvor. Occurs in the runic accusative form oruar. A short form of women's names in r- is ra or Tra. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 296, 347, 351-352; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr; NR s.v. rvor, r-/r-, -vor
raslaug For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 743 s.v. laug def. IV
ra Short form of names in -rr. GB pp. 17; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV p. 747 s.v. rr
rr rr was the daughter of the god Thrr and the goddess Sif, but also appears as a human name and in compounds. GB pp. 17; CV p. 747 s.v. rr
rrn For the first element r- see above. For the second element -rn see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form rurun. NR s.v. rrn, r-, -rn
ura ura is a short form of the name urr CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
urr, rr urr is a weakened form of rr. See r- above. The second element -rr is of uncertain origin. This name appears four times in Laxdla saga (c. 1245): urr the daughter of sgeirr ikollr ("the hot-head"); urr Eyvindardttir, sister of Helgi inn magri ("the lean") and wife of rsteinn raur ("the red"); urr the daughter of Hoskuldr Dala-Kollsson; and urr the daughter of lfr pi ("peacock"). Another urr appears as the daughter of Oddr Onundarson in Hnsa-ris saga. There is another urr in Eirks saga raua, c. late 1100's, the daughter of Eyvindr austmann ("the easterner or Norwegian") and sister of Helgi inn magri. Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu mentions urr dylla ("sow-thistle"), daughter of the title character and mother of Illugi svarti ("the black"). A short form of urr is ura. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 347, 350; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 743 s.v. rr
yra, Thyra, ri Cleasby-Vigfusson says that yri is a weakened form of rv, or the even older form rveig. The name occurs in modern Danish as yra or Thyra. See r- above. For the second element -veig see above. Fellows-Jenson claims that the second element in yri is actually from Primitive Scandinavian wig, "battle". Found in Old Danish as Thorwe, Thyrwi and in OW.Norse as orv, yri. Runic examples include the nominative forms erui, irui, uri, urui, [yrui], the genitive form uruiaR and the accusative forms ourui, urui. This name is extremely common in Denmark from early times onward, including in the runic inscription turui. Found in Sweden as well, including the runic inscription urvi. Also found in West Scandinavia. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 319, 347; CV pp. 690, 743 s.v. veig, rr; NR s.v. rv/rvi, r-/r-, -v, -vig
yrna Of uncertain etymology. Occurs in the runic nominative form [turno]. NR s.v. yrna
yrnni   GB pp. 17
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