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This webpage is, and will probably always be, under development. As my knowledge of Norse naming grows, I will keep revising and updating this page. At this point, I'm aware that the page is really too large, and I'm working out better methods of presentation.

Some of my sources listed names that were either hypothetical forms re-constructed based on place-name and later personal name evidence, or else doubtful interpretations from runic evidence. These have been included, but are shown with the headword in a greyed-out text, for example, Ákimann.

In the list below, I have abbreviated certain source references as follows:

  • CV = Cleasby, Richard and Guðbrandr Vigfusson. An Icelandic-English Dictionary. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon. 1957.

  • GB = Geirr Bassi Haraldsson. The Old Norse Name. Studia Marklandica I. Olney, MD: Markland Medieval Militia. 1977.

  • FJ = Fellows-Jensen, Gillian. Scandinavian Personal Names in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire. Copenhagen. Akademisk Forlag. 1968.

  • NR = Lena Peterson. Nordiskt runnamnslexikon. (Dictionary of Names from Old Norse Runic Inscriptions). Språk- och folkminnes-institutet (Institute for Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research). Accessed 04 Nov 2014.

For full details on any source referenced, please see the Bibliography.

 
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Name Notes Source
Ægileif The first element Ægi- may be related to Old Icelandic Ægir, "the sea or the god of the sea", found in compounds as ægisandr "sea-sand" or the Icelandic place-name Ægisiða. Alternately, it may be related to Old Icelandic ægja, "to frighten, make terrible, found in compounds such as ægilikr, "terrible, awful". The second element -leif, -læif or -lǫf is a feminine name element derived from Primitive Scandinavian *-laibó a formation from the stem in OW.Norse leif "inheritance, legacy", but as an element in personal names "one who comes after, heir" and thus to -læifR/-lafR. Variants in -lǫf derive from a Primitive Scandinavian shortening of /ai/ > /a/. This name appears in Landnámabók ch. 46 for Ægileif Þórsteinsdóttir and in ch. 72 for Ægileif Hrólfsdóttir. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 758 s.v. Ægir, ægja, ægilikr; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Ærinndís, Ærndís The first elementes Ærn-, Ærnn-, Ærin-, Ærinn- comprise alternate forms of the OW.Norse bird-names ǫrn, ari "eagle", or may also be related to OW.Norse arinn "hearth". The second element -dís is identical with the Old Icelandic dís, "goddess, priestess, female guardian spirit." Found in Old Swedish as Ærndis; compare with OW.Norse Arndís. Occurs in the runic nominative forms erintis and erntis. NR s.v. Ær(in)ndís, Ær(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -dís
Æringunnr For the first elementes Ærn-, Ærnn-, Ærin-, Ærinn- see above. The second element -gunnr (and the related forms -guðr and -gundr) is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *gunþió, < *gunþi and is identical with Old Icelandic gunnr, guðr, "war, battle." Found in Old Swedish as Ærngun; compare with OW.Norse Arngunnr. Occurs in the runic accusative form erinkuni. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Æringunnr, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Æsa May perhaps be identical to Old Icelandic æsa, "to stir up, incite, stir up war". This name appears in Landnámabók in ch. 40 for Æsa of Svíney, the mother of Eyjólfr; Æsa Oddleifsdóttir in ch. 46; Æsa, the daughter of Ljótólfr goða in ch. 65; Æsa, daughter of Hrólfr rauðskeggr ("red-beard") in ch. 72; and for Æsa, daughter of Jarl Hákon Grjótgarðsson in ch. 99. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 759 s.v. æsa
Æsileif The first element Æsi- may be identical to the first element æsi-, "violently, furiously", found in Old Icelandic compounds such as æsiliga, "violently, furiously", æsiligr, "vehement". For the second element -leif see above. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 759 s.v. æsi; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Ætta This name is found in Old Danish as Etta and in Old Swedish as Ætta. It may represent a short form of the woman's name Ástríðr. Occurs in the runic accusative form etu. NR s.v. Ætta
Ádís, Ádísa The etymology of the first element Á- is uncertain, as it may come from several possible origins: < *ana-, the intensive first element, "all"; < *anu- "ancestor, forefather"; or from < *az- "point, edge" or "anxiety, fear". For the second element -dís see above. A weak side-form exists, Ádísa. Found in Old Swedish as Adis. Ádís is found in Swedish runic inscriptions as aþis, while the runic form of the weak side form is found in Ǫstergǫtland, Sweden as ntisa. NR s.v. Ádís, Ádísa
Aðísla The feminine form of the Old West Norse masculine name Aðils. The name is derived from *Aþa-gíslaR, with the first element Að- being from either *aþa- or else from *aþal- "noble, foremost". The second element is from -gísl or its side-form -gils, and may be related to the Langobard word gísil "arrow-shaft" and also to OW.Norse geisl m. "staff", geisli m. "sun-beam"; a shaft typical of a weapon or a part of a weapon, or the second element may also be linked to OW.Norse gísl m. "hostage". Aðísla is found in Swedish runic inscriptions as oþ[is]la. NR s.v. Aðísla, Að-, -gísl
Áfríðr For the first element Á- see above. The second element -fríðr is from the OW.Norse adjective fríðr "beautiful" in the original sense of "beloved" and related to the OW.Norse verb frjá "to love". This name is found in Old Swedish as Afridh. Runic forms include the nominative forms afiriþ, afriþ, afriþ, af×riþ, (a)friþr, ifriþ, ifriþr and the accusative form afriþi. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Áfríðr, Á-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ágerðr, Ágærðr For the first element Á- see above. The second element -gerðr or -gærðr is probably derived from *-garðió and related to the second element -garðr, which is identical to OW.Norse garðr "fence, defense". A runic instance occurs in the nominative case as aker. NR s.v. Ágærðr, Á-, -gærðr, -garðr
Agata Christian, Agatha GB pp. 7
Agnes Christian, "lamb of God" GB pp. 7
Aldís The first element Al- or Ól- is derived from *alu, "protection, fortune." The second element -dís is identical with the Old Icelandic dís, "goddess, priestess, female guardian spirit." This name appears in chs. 90 and 98 of Landnámabók for Aldís Ófeigsdóttir, the mother of Valla-Brandr. A runic example is found in the nominative case as alfti. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís; NR s.v. Al-, -dís, Dísa
Álfdís, Alfdís The first element Alf- is identical with Old Icelandic alfr, "elf." For the second element -dís see above. Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Álfdís Konallsdóttir, the wife of Óláfr feilan ("wolf-cub"). This name appears in Landnámabók for Álfdís Konálsdóttur in chs. 40 and 98; and for Álfdís Gamlisdóttir, mother of Oddr munk in ch. 55. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís; NR s.v. Alfdís, Alf-, -dís
Aldríf This name is of uncertain etymology. The first element is perhaps Al- (see above). The second element may be -dríf, related to the second element in the OW.Norse feminine name Sigrdríf or Sigrdrífa, which is found as both a mythological name and as a personal name. A different opinion holds that the second element is a shortened form of Sigrdríf or Sigrdrífa. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as altrifaR. FJ pp. 342; NR s.v. Aldríf, Al-
Álfeiðr For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -heiðr is identical to the Old Icelandic heiðr, "heath", but usually drops the initial h in name-compounds. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 247 s.v. heiðr
Alhildr, Álfhildr For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -hildr is identical to Old Icelandic hildr, "battle" and ultimately derives from Primitive Scandinavian *heldió. Found in Old Danish as Alvild, OW.Norse Álfhildr. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as alhiltar. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr; NR s.v. Al(f)hildr, Alf-, -hildr
Alfífa, Álfífa The first element may perhaps be from Alf- (see above) or from Al- (see above). The second element fífa may perhaps be identical with Old Icelandic fífa, used metaphorically in poetry as "arrow". A similar word, fífla, is found in Grettis saga meaning "a girl". GB pp. 7, 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 155 s.v. fífa, fífla
Alfrún For the first element Alf- see above. The second element -rún is from OW.Norse rún, itself derived from Germanic *rúnó, with an original sense of "secret, hidden knowledge". As a second element -rún should be understood as having the meaning, "she who possesses hidden knowledge". Found in West Scandinavia as a mythological name, and as the Old English name Ælfrun. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. FJ pp. 8, 342, 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rún; NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
Álmveig The first element Álm- is probably identical with Old Icelandic álmr, "elm, elm-tree". The etymology of the second element -veig is unclear. It may derive from OW.Norse veig "strong, powerful," which comes from Germanic *waizó, or it may instead come from OW.Norse víg "battle" and the OW.Norse adjective vígr "competent in battle, skilled with weapons". There is a slight possibility that -veig may instead be derived from OW.Norse "holy place" (compare with the Gothic adjective weihs "holy"). Cleasby-Vigfusson suggests a fourth possible derivation, from Old Icelandic veig, "a strong drink, alcoholic beverage" used of beer and the Mead of Poetry. It is uncertain whether the name Álmveig was ever used of human persons, as it appears in the Hyndluljóð in the Poetic Edda. CV pp. 43, 690 s.v. álmr, veig; NR s.v. -væig
Álof, Álǫf The feminine form of Óláfr. The first element is from *Anu-, "ancestor." For the second element -leif see above. This name is found in Landnámabók for Álǫf Ófeigsdóttir in ch. 21; Álǫf, the daughter of Þórsteinn rauðr ("the red") in ch. 37; Álǫf Þorgrímsdóttir in ch. 40; Álǫf Ingólfsdóttir in ch. 52; Álǫf, the daughter of Ragnar loðbrókkr ("shaggy-breeches") in ch. 55; Álǫf, the daughter of king Haraldr hárfagra ("fair-hair") in ch. 82; Álǫf, the daughter of Bǫðvarr Víkinga-Kárason of Vǫrs in ch. 99; and Álǫf, the daughter of Þórðr vaggagði ("squat-wiggle") in ch. 99. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 6, 342, 350; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Alvé, Alví For the first element Al- see above. The second element -ví comes from the Germanic *-wíhó, derived from Germanic *-wíhaz and related to the Gothic adjective weihs "holy" - thus the sense should be "priest". A runic example is found in the nominative case as alui. NR s.v. Alví, Al-, -ví, -vér
Alvǫr For the first element Al- see above. The second element vǫr is the feminine form corresponding to the masculine second element -varr, from *-waró "to be vigilant" (compare to the OW.Norse adjective varr "vigilant"), derived from Germanic *-waraz or *-warjaz "defend, protect" and related to the Old Norse verb verja, "defend". GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 351-352
Alþrúðr For the first element Al- see above. The second element -þrúðr is from OW.Norse *þrúðr, possibly from Primitive Scandinavian *þrúþió < *þrúþi, "strength, power, force" and also appears in the mythology as the name of the goddess Þrúðr, daughter of the god Thórr and the goddess Sif. Runic examples occur as the nominative form (a)lrþuþr and the accusative alþruþi. CV p. 747 s.v. Þrúðr, Þrúða; NR s.v. Alþrúðr, Al-, -þrúðr
Amma A short form of names in Arn-, Am-, or from Old Swedish amma and OW.Norse amma, "grandmother". Found later in Old Swedish as a by-name and in OW.Norse as the name of a fictional character. A runic example occurs in the accusative case as a-mu. NR s.v. Amma
Ámóða For the first element Á- see above. The second element is a weak side-form of -móð, from Germanic *-móðó, which becomes OW.Norse -móðr, "temprament; wrath; courage". A runic example occurs in the nominative case as omuþa. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Ámóða, Á-, -móð, -móðr
Arnbjǫrg The first element is Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, representing various alternate forms of the OW.Norse bird-names ǫrn, ari "eagle". The name-element might also considered to be identical to OW.Norse arinn "hearth". The second element -bjǫrg or -borg is derived from Germanic *-bergó or else the name is derived from the OW.Norse verb bjarga "to save, to help, to deliver out of need or danger". The second element form -borg, frequently found in Swedish and Danish names, may also come from a postulated form *-burgó but may also be considered to reflect a sound development from -bjǫrg. Found in Old Swedish in several forms: Anborgh, Arnborgh, Ærnborgh, Ærinnborgh, OW.Norse Arnbiǫrg. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as arnburk and in the accusative case as arin:biaurk. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arnbjǫrg of Arnbjargarlæk in ch. 24; Arnbjǫrg, whose mother was Vigdís Þorsteinsdóttir in ch. 39; Arnbjǫrg Þórðardóttir in ch. 64; and Arnbjǫrg Ráðormsdóttir in chs. 86 and 95. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjǫrg; NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)nbiôrg/-borg, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -biôrg/-borg
Arndís For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arndís in auðga ("the rich"), daughter of Steinólfr, in chs. 42 and 53; Arndís Styrbjarnardóttir in ch. 60; Arndís Heðinsdóttur in ch. 63; and Arndís Þórkelsdóttir in ch. 74. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís
Arneiðr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -eiðr see above. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arneiðr, daughter of Jarl Ásbjǫrn skerjablesi ("skerry-blaze") in chs. 76 and 99. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 247 s.v. heiðr
Arnfasta For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -fasta represents a weak side-form of -fast/-fǫst, from the OW.Norse adjective fastr "firm, strong". This name is the feminine form of masculine Arnfasti. A runic example is found in the nominative case as arnfasta. NR s.v. Arnfasta, Arnfasti, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -fast/-fôst
Arnfríðr For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -fríðr or -frøðr comes from *friðuR, "love, peace" or -fríðr from *friðioR, related to Gotlandic frijion, "to love" with an original meaning of "beloved" and later meaning "fair." Found in Old Danish as Arnfrith, in Old Swedish as Arfridh, Arnfridh, Ærnfridh, Ærinnfridh, Ænfridh, Ærnfridh. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arnfríðr Sleitu-Bjarnardóttir in ch. 63. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Arn-/Ærnfríðr, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -fríðr, Fríða
Arngerðr, Arngærðr, Arinngærðr, Ærngærðr, Ærinngærðr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. Old Swedish forms include Angærdh, Arngærdh, Æringærdh. Runic forms occur in the nominative case as arker, rkir, erinker. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arngerðr Þorbjarnardóttir in chs. 42 and 52; Arngerðr, sister of Skíða of Skíðadal in ch. 65; and Arngerðr Ásbrandsdóttir in ch. 98. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerðr; NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)ngærðr, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -gærðr, -garðr
Arngunnr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arngunnr Hámundardóttir in ch. 85; and for Arngunnr, daughter of Þórsteinn drangakarl in ch. 91. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 344; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Arnkatla For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -katla is a feminine form of the masculine second element -ketill or -kell, from OW.Norse ketill, originally "kettle" but meaning also "helmet" or "chieftain with helmet." This name is found in Landnámabók for Arnkatla Þórðardóttir, sister of Þórðr kǫttr ("cat") in ch. 38; and for Arnkatla, daughter of Þórsteinn vífill ("weevil") and Þórkatla in ch. 87. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
Arnlaug For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -laug comes from Germanic *-lauz-, identical to the Gothic verb liugan "give holy vows, enter into marriage". The name-element may then originally have the meaning, "one who is promised or dedicated (to)". Others interpret this element as possibly being related to Old Icelandic laug and Latin lavare, in an ancient sense of "bathing for religious purification". Found in Old Danish as Arløgh, in Old Swedish as Ærnløgh, and in OW.Norse as Arnlaug. Runic examples in the nominative case include a-lauk, erlyg. FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV; NR s.v. Arn-/Ærnlaug, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -laug
Arnleif For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -leif see above. This name is found in Landnámabók for Arnleif, daughter of Þórðr gellir ("yeller, screamer") in chs. 34 and 64. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342, 350; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Arnóra, Arnþóra For the first element Arn- see above. The second element -þóra and -dóra is identical to the Old Icelandic Þórr, the god of thunder. The name Arnóra is found in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, for Arnóra the daughter of Einarr of Laugarbrekka. This name also appears in Landnámabók for Arnóra Laugarbrekku-Einarsdóttir in ch. 28; Arnóra, daughter of Þórðr gellir ("yeller, screamer") in ch. 34; Arnóra Lón-Einarsdóttir and Arnóra Gunnbjarnardóttir in ch. 38; and Arnóra, daughter of Þórgeirr inn óði ("the raging") in ch. 65. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Arnvé For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples include the nominative case ari, ar[ni], erinui, erin..., irinui. NR s.v. Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)nví, Ar(in)n-/Ær(in)n-, -ví, -vér
Arnþrúðr For the first element Arn- see above. For the second element -þrúðr see above. In Hrafnkels saga freysgoða there is an Arnþrúðr who is a foreign-born bondservant. This name also appears in Landnámabók for Arnþrúðr Arinbjarnardóttir in ch. 22. The short form for names in -þrúða is Þrúða. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV p. 747 s.v. Þrúðr, Þrúða; NR s.v. -þrúðr
Ása A short form for names in Ás-, Æs- or Ós-, which are from *ansuR and related to Old Icelandic áss or óss, "a god." Found in the Anglo-Scandinavian form Asa. Occurs in Old Danish as Asa or Ose, and in Old Swedish Asa. Runic forms include nominative case aosa, asa, osa, the genitive case forms asu, osuahsu, asr, asu. The name Ása appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the mother of the title character. This name also appears in Landnámabók in ch. 26 for Ása Ingjaldsdóttir, sister to Grímr Ingjaldsson and granddaughter to Hróald; and for Ása, mother of Þórunnr in ch. 92. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 18, 342; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss; NR s.v. Ása, Ás-/Æs-
Ásbjǫrg, Ásbǫrg For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg, -borg see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 46. 66 s.v. áss, bjǫrg
Ásboð?, Ásmóð For the first element Ás- see above. The second element is uncertain. Runic inscriptions have the accusative case forms asboþ, os-uþ A feminine second element -boð (from *-buðó) or -bǫð (from *-baðó) are not found in the Nordic area. The second element may instead be -móð, from Germanic *-móðó, which becomes OW.Norse -móðr, "temprament; wrath; courage". An Old Danish woman's name of Asmoth suggests that an Old Norse form of Ásmóð is likely. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Ásboð, Ásmóð, Ás-/Æs-, -móð, -móðr
Ásdís For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ásdís Bárðardóttir in ch. 29; and Ásdís Þórgrímsdóttir in ch. 48. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 46, 100 s.v. áss, dís
Ásfríðr For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Runic examples include the nominative case forms asfriþ, osfriþr. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Ásfríðr, Ástríðr/Æstríðr, Ás-/Æs-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ásgauta This name is uncertain, as it appears in runic form as the nominative case askata, although this example may instead represent the feminine name Áskatla. If the inscription is Ásgauta, then it is a feminine form of masculine Ásgautr. For the first element Ás- see above. The second element -gauta is from OW.Norse gautr, pl. gautar "inhabitant of Gǫtland, Gǫtlander". NR s.v. Ásgauta, Ásgautr, Ás-/Æs-, -gautr
Ásgerða, Ásgerðr For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. This is a west Scandinavian name, but there are a couple of instances in Swedish runic inscriptions of Ásgerðr. Appears in Old Danish as Esgerth. Runic examples include the nominative forms asker, [askiar], askir, oskir; the genitive form askiarþ and the accusative forms eskerþi, oskarþi. Ásgerðr Bjarnardóttir appears in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu and in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, where she is mentioned as being wife to Egill Skallagrímsson and mother of Þórsteinn Egilsson. This name also appears in Landnámabók for Ásgerðr, wife of Ófeigr in ch. 21 and 89; Ásgerðr Þórðardóttir in ch. 64; and Ásgerðr, daughter of Askr inn ómálgi in ch. 89. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian derived place-name Asgarthcroft, c. 1523. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 24, 342, 349; CV pp. 46, 197 s.v. áss, Gerðr; NR s.v. Ásgærðr, Ás-/Æs-, -gærðr
Ásgunnr For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Appears in Old Danish as Asgun and in Old Swedish as Asgun. A runic form, askun appears in the nominative case. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Ásgunnr, Ás/Æs-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Ásheiðr, Æshæiðr For the first element Ás- or Æs- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form esiþi. NR s.v. Æshæiðr, Ás-/Æs-, -hæiðr
Áshildr For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Áshildr, wife of Óláfur tvennumbrúni ("double-brows") in ch. 97. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 46, 261 s.v. áss, hildr
Áskatla For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -katla see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms askala, askata, askatla, oskatla. NR s.v. Áskatla, Ás-/Æs-, -kæ(ti)ll, Kætill
Áslaug For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -laug see above. The name Áslaug appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the grandmother of the title character. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 46, 374 s.v. áss, laug def. IV
Ásleif For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -leif see above. Appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as the name of the wife of Ólafr Hrólfsson, the mother of Sveinn. This name also appears in Landnámabók for Ásleif Þórgilsdóttir in ch. 94. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Ásmoð, Ásbóð? For the first element Ás- see above. The second element is uncertain. Runic inscriptions have the accusative case forms asboþ, os-uþ A feminine second element -boð (from *-buðó) or -bǫð (from *-baðó) are not found in the Nordic area. The second element may instead be -móð, from Germanic *-móðó, which becomes OW.Norse -móðr, "temprament; wrath; courage". An Old Danish woman's name of Asmoth suggests that an Old Norse form of Ásmóð is likely. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Ásboð, Ásmóð, Ás-/Æs-, -móð, -móðr
Ásný For the first element Ás- see above. The second element -ný is from the the OW.Norse adjective nýr "new". This name appears in Landnámabók for Ásný, Víga-Sturludóttir in chs. 44 and 48; Ásný Vestarsdóttir in ch. 90; and Ásný Flosadóttir in ch. 94. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss; NR s.v. -ný
Ásta Ásta is the short form for the name Ástríðr, and is also found as a personal name. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ásta, the daughter of Guðbrandr kúla ("knob") and mother of king Óláfr in ch. 53; Ásta, whose mother was Úlfhildr and whose som was king Óláfr inn helgi ("the holy", St. Ólafr) in ch. 55. GB pp. 8; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss
Ástríðr The first element Ást- here is a form of Old Icelandic áss, "god, one of the Æsir". In proper names, the first element becomes Ást- before the liquid r. The second element is from -fríðr, see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Estrith and in Old Swedish as Astridh (this example is from Bohuslän) and Æstridh, OW.Norse Ástríðr. Runic examples oinclude the nominative case forms astriþ, astriþr, estriþ, istryr, ostriþ, ostriþr; genitive case estriþaR; and accusative case asriþi, osriþi. This name appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Ástríðr of Breidafjǫrd, wife of Bárðr Hǫskuldsson. This name also appears in Landnámabók for Ástríðr slækidrengr ("slender as a youth"), the daughter of Bragi the skáld in ch. 22; Ástríðr Hrólfsdóttir in ch. 32; Ástríðr Grímsdóttir in ch. 39; Ástríðr, the wife of Arnmóðr Heðinsson in ch. 55; Ástríðr, the daughter of Þórvaldr holbarki ("braggart") in ch. 77; and Ástríðr manvitsbrekka ("hill of man's wit", i.e., paragon of wisdom), daughter of Móðólfr in ch. 78 and 85. Short forms of Ástríðr include Old Danish Etta and in Old Swedish Ætta. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss; NR s.v. Ásfríðr, Ástríðr/Æstríðr, Ás-/Æs-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ásvé, Ásví For the first element Ás- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. A runic example found in nominative form is -sui. NR s.v. Ásví, Ás-/Æs-, -ví, -vér
Ásvǫr For the first element Ás- see above. The second element -vǫr represents a feminine name element from *-waró, derived from Germanic *-waraz or *-warjaz, related to Germanic *warón "to be vigilant" (compare with the OW.Norse adjective varr "vigilant") or Germanic *warjan "defend, protect." Appears in Old Danish as Aswar. Runic forms include the nominative case [osuar] and accusative case osuar. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ásvǫr, daughter of Þórir Graut-Atlason in ch. 75; Ásvǫr Brynjólfsdóttir in ch. 77; Ásvǫr, daughter of Oddbjǫrn askasmiðr ("ship-wrignt") in ch. 90; and Ásvǫr Vestarsdóttir, the mother of Helgi inn svarti ("the black") in ch. 90. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 351-352; CV pp. 46 s.v. áss; NR s.v. Ásvǫr, Ás-/Æs-, -vǫr; NR s.v. -vǫr
ÁsælfR For the first element Ás- see above. The second element -ælfR is a feminine name element from *-albió-, related to masculine -alfR, from OW.Norse alfr m. "elf, a type of subterranean being". A runic example found in the accusative case is aselfi. NR s.v. ÁsælfR, Ás-/Æs-, -ælfR
Auða A diminuitive form of names in Auð-. A single instance of this name appears as the name of a fictional character in West Scandinavia, but a few instances are found in Swedish runic inscriptions in the nominative form auþa, the genitive form auþuR and the accusative form uþu. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian form Auda, c. 1245. FJ pp. 37-38; NR s.v. Auða, Auð-
AuðælfR The first element Auð- is occasionally written Od- and is of uncertain origin, but may be from Old Icelandic auðr, "wealth," though it is also suggested that it may be related to the poetical term auðr, "fate, destiny". For the second element -ælfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ødhælf. A runic example in the accusative case appears as auþelfi. NR s.v. AuðælfR, Auð-, -ælfR
Auðbjǫrg For the first element Auð- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg see above. A short form of names in Auð- is Auða. GB pp. 7; CV pp. 32, 66 s.v. auðr, bjǫrg
Auðfríðr For the first element Auð- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Appears in runic inscriptions as the possible nominarive form [auþfri...] and the genitive case auþfriþaR. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Auðfríðr, Auð-, -fríðr, Fríða
Auðgerðr For the first element Auð- see above. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. Appears in Old Danish as Øthgerth and in Old Swedish as Ødhgærdh. Runic forms include the nominative case auþker, [auþker], uþkiarþ and the accusative case auþkerþi. NR s.v. Auðgærðr, Auð-, -gærðr
Auðguðr For the first element Auð- see above. For the second element -guðr see -gunnr above. A runic example is found in the nominative form a-þkuþr. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Auðguðr, Auð-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Auðhelga For the first element Auð- see above. The second element -helga is related to the Old Icelandic hælga, "holy, hallowed, sanctified". A short form of names in Auð- is Auða. GB pp. 7; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 32, 254-255 s.v. auðr, Helgi, helga
Auðhildr For the first element Auð- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A single instance of this name is found in the Orkneys in the early 1100's. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Othild (1166-1176), Audhild (1208), Authild (1219). A short form of names in Auð- is Auða. FJ pp. 39, 342, 349; CV pp. 32, 261 s.v. auðr, hildr
Auðr, Auða Of uncertain origin, but may be from *Auðió- and Old Icelandic auðr, "wealth, riches, luck," though it is also suggested that it may be related to the poetical term auðr, "fate, destiny." Occurs in the runic nominative form ayþr. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Auðr is the sister of Þórkel hvelpr ("whelp") and Knútr of Saurby, and is married to Þórðr Ingunnarson. Auðr in djúpúðga ("the deep-minded"), daughter of Ketill flatnefr ("flat-nose") and one of the original settlers of Iceland, is perhaps the best known woman with this name, and she appears in several sources, including Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, as well as being mentioned in many places in Landnámabók. A short form of names in Auð- is Auða. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 32, 66 s.v. auðr; NR s.v. Øyðr
Auga The feminine or masculine name Auga is related to the OW.Norse man's by-name Auga and with OW.Norse auga "eye". A runic inscription in the nominative case gives auka. NR s.v. Auga
Aþmiul Celtic name. A runic example is found in the accusative case as aþmiu.... NR s.v. Aþmiul
 
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Name Notes Source
Baugeið, Baugeiðr The first element Baug- is identical to Old Icelandic baugr, a ring or armlet, particularly the sacred temple ring upon which oaths were made. The compound baugeiðr is specifically used for this oath. However, in this name the second element is probably actually from -heiðr see above. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 53-54, 117, 247 s.v. baugr, baugeiðr, eiðr, heiðr
Begga   GB pp. 8
Bera From the root ber, "bear" found also in berserkr. The name Bera is found in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, for Bera Yngvarsdóttir, mother of Egill Skallagrímsson; she is also mentioned in Landnámabók ch. 25. Landnámabók ch. 100 states that Egill Skallagrímsson also had a daughter named Bera. A diminuitive form of this name is Birla. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 58 s.v. bera
Bergdís The first element Berg- is identical to the Norwegian dialect term berg, "protection, help." For the second element -dís see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Bergdís Geirsdóttir, ch. 20; and for Bergdís, the wife of Grímr Ingjaldsson in ch. 26. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís
Berghildr For the first element Berg- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Bergljót For the first element Berg- see above. The second element -ljót is thought to derive from Old Icelandic *ljótr, "giving light" but may instead be related to Old Icelandic ljótr, "ugly". This name appears in Landnámabók for Bergljót, daughter of Jarl Þórir þegjandi ("the silent") in ch. 82. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342, 350
Bergþóra For the first element Berg- see above. For the second element -þóra see above. This name appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Bergþóra, daughter of Óláfr Hǫskuldsson and wife of Þórhall goða ("priest"). This name also appears in Landnámabók for Bergþóra, daughter of Kolgrímr inn gamli ("the old") in ch. 14; and for Bergþóra Hrútssdóttir in ch. 39. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Berkhildr For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the daughter of King Hertryggyr. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Birla Diminuitive form with the -l- second element of the OW.Norse feminine name Bera. Appears in a runic incription in the nominative case as birla. NR s.v. Birla
Birna May be identical with the Old Icelandic birna, "she-bear". GB pp. 8; CV pp. 63 s.v. birna
Bjargey The first element Bjarg- may derive from Old Icelandic bjarga, "to save, to help", or it may instead be related to Old Icelandic bjarg, "rocks, precipices". The second element -ey or -øy is of uncertain origin but may derive either from a feminine form of Primitive Scandinavian auja "happiness, luck, (luck) giver" or may be related to closely related to Primitive Scandinavian *awió "island", Old Icelandic ey, "island." The word ey is also used as a poetic circumlocution for "woman", and in poetical diction ey is personified as a goddess, the sea being her girdle, the glaciers her head-gear. This name appears in Landnámabók for Bjargey Valbrandsdóttir, wife of Hávarðr halti ("the lame") in ch. 50. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 64-65, 134 s.v. bjarg, bjarga, ey; NR s.v. -øy
Bjollok This name appears in Landnámabók for Bjollok, wife of Áslákr aurgoði in ch. 85. GB pp. 8
Bjǫrg See -bjǫrg above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Bjǫrg, the daughter of Eyvindr austmann ("the easterner") in ch. 43; and Bjǫrg Ísólfsdóttir in ch. 86. GB pp. 8; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjǫrg
Bǫðný The first element Bǫð- or Bǫðv- is identical to OW.Norse bǫð (genitive form bǫðvar), derived from Germanic *baðwó "battle". For the second element -ný see above. A runic example is found in the genitive case as (b)(y)(þ)nuiaR. NR s.v. Bǫðný, Bǫð(v)-, -ný
Bǫðvildr For the first element Bǫð- or Bǫðv- see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Bolla Short form of the OW.Norse names Bǫðvildr, Bóthildr, Borghildr. Found in a runic inscription in the accusative case as bulu. NR s.v. Bolla
Borga Short form of feminine names in Borg- or -borg. The first element Borg- is an alternate form of Berg- and thus derived from the OW.Norse verb bjarga "to save, to help." The first element Borg- is sometimes assumed to be derived from OW.Norse borg "castle, fortified place". Runic forms appear in the nominative case as borha, burka. NR s.v. Borga, Borg-, -borg
Borghildr For the first element Borg- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 66, 261 s.v. bjǫrg, hildr
Borgunna For the first element Borg- see above. The second element -gunna is a weak side-form of -unnr/-uðr, which is itself a Primitive Scandinavian -ió-stem formation from the OW.Norse verb unna (O.Engl. unnan, OH.Germ. (gi)unnan) "to love". This name-element is sometimes instead thought to derive from OW.Norse unnr, from *unþi- "to wave, billow, roll, undulate". This name appears in runic form in the nominative case as burkuna. NR s.v. Borgunna, Borg-, -unnr/-uðr
Bót Related to Old Icelandic bót, "fee, wergeld, compensation, remedy, improvement". Bót appears in ch. 99 of Landnámabók as the ambátt or servant of Ketilbjǫrn. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342-343
Bótey For the first element Bót- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 342-343
Bótfríðr For the first element Bót- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Runic forms include the nominative case bofriþr and accusative case butriþu. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Bótfríðr, Bót-, -fríðr, Fríða
Bótheiðr, Bóthæiðr For the first element Bót- see above. The second element -heiðr or -hæiðr is from Primitive Scandinavian *-haiðió- "brilliance, beauty", related to the OW.Norse adjective heiðr "light, clear, bright". Found in Old Swedish as Botheidh (example from Gotland). A runic example in the nominative case includes [botaiþr]. NR s.v. Bóthæiðr, Bót-, -hæiðr
Bóthildr, Bóthilda For the first element Bót- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Both forms are fairly frequent in Norway after 1300. rare in Iceland, though found in Swedish and common in Danish. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Botild (c. 1152-1200), Botilda (c. 1185-1207), Botilde (c. 1170-1249). A diminuitive form of this name is Bolla. GB pp. 8; FJ pp. 61, 342-343, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Bótvé, Bótví For the first element Bót- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Swedish as Botvi (this example from Gotland). A runic example exists in the nominative case as botui. NR s.v. Bótví, Bót-, -ví, -vér
Brígiða Celtic, Brigid, Brigit GB pp. 8
Bryngerðr The first element Bryn- (before a vowel Brynj-) is identical with Old Icelandic brynja, "corselet, mail-coat, byrnie." For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Bryngerðr, mother of Friðleifr, and her great-granddaughter Bryngerðr Þjóðarsdóttir in ch. 65. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 85, 197 s.v. brynja, Gerðr
Brynhildr For the first element Bryn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name probably came to Scandinavia with the story of the valkyrie Brunhild. The name is fairly common in Norway from the late 1100's onwards but less common in Iceland. A couple of instances are found in Denmark, in the Latinized form Brunildis. The name Brynhildr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of Budli. Also appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the name of the mother of Bosi. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Brunildesford (1360) and Brunildeberge (1220-1250). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 67, 343, 349; CV pp. 85, 261 s.v. brynja, hildr
Busla The name Busla appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the name of the foster-mother of Bosi.  

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Name Notes Source
Dageiðr The first element Dag- is identical to Old Icelandic dagr, "day". For the second element -eiðr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 94-95, 247 s.v. dagr, heiðr
Dagmær For the first element Dag- see above. The second element -mær may possibly be related to Old Icelandic mær, "maiden, girl", or to Old Icelandic mærr, "famous". The name Dagmær appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the wife of King Þrándr. FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 94-95, 443 s.v. dagr, mær, mærr
Dagný For the first element Dag- see above. For the second element -ný see above. The name Dagný appears in the early 14th century legendary saga Þórsteins þáttr bæjarmagns as the mother of the title character. CV pp. 94-95 s.v. dagr; NR s.v. -ný
Dagrún For the first element Dag- see above. For the second element -rún see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Dagrún, the mother of Bersi, in ch. 90. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 94-95, 504 s.v. dagr, rún; NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
Dalla This name appears in Landnámabók for Dalla, sister of Þórgeirr Galtason and wife of Þórvaldr Hjaltason, in ch. 74. GB pp. 9
Dís From OW.Norse dís "goddess, female god". A runic example in the accusative case appears as tisi. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís; NR s.v. Dís, -dís
Dísa See Dís above. Found in Old Swedish as Disa. A runic example is found in the nominative case as tisa. Dísa is a short-form for names in Dís- or -dís. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís; NR s.v. Dís, -dís
DísælfR For the first element Dís- see Dís above. For the second element -ælfR see above. Runic instances include the nominative case tiselfr and tisilfR. NR s.v. DísælfR, Dís, Dís-, -ælfR
Dómhildr The first element Dóm- may be related to Old Icelandic dómr, "judgement, legal sentence, fate, doom", which is also found in a number of legal terms in Old Norse. For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 101, 261 s.v. dómr, hildr
Dóra Dóra is a short form of names with the -dóra second element, such as Halldóra. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Dóta Found in Old Danish and Old Swedish as Dota; compare with the Old Swedish man's by-name Dota, OW.Norse Dótta, and the Old Danish man's by-name Dotta. Of uncertain etymology. Found in the nominative case in a runic inscription as -ota. NR s.v. Dóta
Dótta A Danish name, probably a form of dóttir, "daughter". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 102 s.v. Dótta
DóttiR Found in Old Danish as Dotir and in Old Swedish as Dottir. From OW.Norse dóttir "daughter". Found in runic inscriptions in the nominative case as tutiR and tu-iR. NR s.v. DóttiR
Drífa May be related to the Old Icelandic dríf, meaning "driven snow". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 106 s.v. dríf
Droplaug For the second element -laug see above. The name Droplaug appears in Vápnfirðinga saga as the mother of the boys who are newphews to Hallkatla. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV
Drótt May be identical to Old Icelandic drótt, "household, a people, the king's warband". Found in Ynglingasaga ch. 20. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 107 s.v. drótt
Dýrfinna The first element Dýr- may be from Old Icelandic dýr, "deer", or else from Old Icelandic dýrr, 'dear, precious". The second element -finna is the feminine of Old Icelandic finnr, which means "Saami, Laplander." The word is often mistranslated as "a person from Finland, a Finn", and often is used to mean "sorcerer, magician, practicioner of seiðr, since the Saami were believed to be mighty magicians. This name appears in Landnámabók for Dýrfinna, mother of Þórsteinm smiðr Skeggjason ("the smith") in ch. 67. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 111-112, 154 s.v. dýr, dýrr, Finnar
Dýrhildr For the first element Dýr- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 111-112, 261 s.v. dýr, dýrr, hildr
 
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Name Notes Source
Edda The name Edda is found in Rígsþula in the Poetic Edda. This name also appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the name of the daughter of King Hárekr. CV pp. 114 s.v. edda
Eðla May be from eðla-, related to German edel- and Danish ædel-, "noble". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 114, 115 s.v. eðal-, eðla-
Eðna Celtic GB pp. 9
Eðný For the second element -ný see above. The name Eðný appears in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the daughter of King Hákon, and in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of King Hárekr. GB pp. 9; NR s.v. -ný
Eilíf This name is the feminine form of the man's name Eilífr/ÆilífR. The first element Ei-, Æi- has several proposed origins: the first is from Primitive Scandinavian *aiwa "always", the second is from Primitive Scandinavian *aina- "one, alone" and the third explanation sees this first element as originating as a delabialized form of the first element Ey-, Øy-. The sufix is from Primitive Scandinavian *-líbaR and OW.Norse líf "life" and is related to -læifR/-lafR. NR s.v. Æilíf
Eilína, Elína Christian, Helen. This name appears in Landnámabók for Elína, daughter of king Burisláv, in ch. 63. GB pp. 9
Eirný The first element Eir- may be related to Old Icelandic eir, "peace, clemency". For the second element -ný see above. There was also a goddess named Eir, one of Frigga's handmaidens. This name appears in Landnámabók for Eirný Þiðrandadóttr in ch. 42 GB pp. 9; CV pp. 123 s.v. eir; NR s.v. -ný
Ellisif Ellisif is the Nordicized version of the Russian name Elisaveta, the daughter of Jaroslav who married Norwegian king Haraldr hardrada. GB pp. 9; Bløndal pp. 55
Embla, Emla This is a mythological name, found in Vǫluspá 17, where the creation of man is explained by the gods finding two trees, an askr (ash) and embla and from then created the first man and woman, who were then called Askr and Embla. The exact meaning of embla is unknown, though scholars have noted its similarities to almr, "elm", but the word also is used by Egil Skallagrimsson in the compound emblu-askr, which suggests that it may be related to "ash tree" instead. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 127 s.v. Embla
Emma   GB pp. 9
Engilborg, Ingilborg Christian. The first element Engil- is identical to Old Icelandic engill "angel", a loan-word from Latin angelus. For the second element -borg see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 66, 123-130 s.v. bjǫrg, engill
Erna Identical to the Old Icelandic adjective ern, "brisk, vigorous". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 133 s.v. ern
Esja This name may possibly be related to Old Norse esja, a kind of clay. There is a mountain in Iceland named Esja. Landnámabók lists the name of a farm as Esju-berg, "Clay Berg". GB pp. 9; CV pp. 134 s.v. esja
Evja   GB pp. 9
Eybjǫrg The first element Ey- (or before a vowel, Eyj-) is of uncertain origin but may derive from *auja, "fortune, gift." The Cleasby-Vigfusson dictionary states that while the second element -ey may be related to the word for island, from Primitive Scandinavian *awió, when it appears as the first element Ey- or Eyj- then the word comes from a different root. For the second element -bjǫrg, -borg see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form ayburg. NR s.v. Øyborg, Øy-, -biôrg/-borg
Eydís For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -dís see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ødis and in OW.Norse as Eydís. Occurs in the runic accusative forms (a)utisi, aytisi. This name appears in Landnámabók for Eydís, wife of Þórsteinn goði ("chieftain"), in ch. 73. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 134 s.v. dís, ey; NR s.v. Øydís, Øy-, -dís
Eyfríðr For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey; NR s.v. Fríða
Eyfura For the first element Ey- see above. The second element -fura may be related to the Old Icelandic word fura, "fir-tree". The name Eyfura appears in the legendary saga Ǫrvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Angantyr. CV pp. 134, 178 s.v. ey, fura
Eyildr For the first element Ey- see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. FJ pp. 348, 349; CV pp. 134, 261 s.v. ey, hildr
Eyja See Ey- above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Eyja Ingjaldsdóttir in ch. 46. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey
Eylaug For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 134, 374 s.v. ey, laug def. IV
Eyvǫr For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 351-352; CV pp. 134 s.v. ey; NR s.v. -vǫr
Eyþóra For the first element Ey- see above. For the second element -þóra see . FJ pp. 342; CV pp. 134, 743 s.v. ey, Þórr
 
F
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Name Notes Source
Falgerðr For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 349; CV p. 197 s.v. Gerðr
Fasta Short form of feminine names in Fast-, -fast/-fǫst. May appear in a runic inscription in the nominative case as [fasta]. NR s.v. Fasta, Fast-, -fast/-fǫst
Fastgerðr The first element Fast- is related to Old Icelandic fastr, "firm, fast". For the second element -gerðr see above. Runic forms in the nominative case include faskr and fstkir. NR s.v. Fastgærðr, Fast-, -gærðr
Fastheiðr For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative form fasteþr and the accusative form [fasti]þi. NR s.v. Fasthæiðr, Fast-, -hæiðr
Fastný For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -ný see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Fastný Brynjólfsdóttir in ch. 76. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 145 s.v. fastr; NR s.v. -ný
Fastríðr For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Possibly found in Old Swedish as Fastridh. A runic inscription has the nominative form fatriþ. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Fastríðr, Fast-, -fríðr, Fríða
Fastvé, Faství For the first element Fast- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as fastui, [fastui] and in the accusative case as fastui, (f)astuiu. NR s.v. Faství, Fast-, -ví, -vér
Finna See -finna above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Finna Skaftadóttir, wife of Refr inn mikli ("the great") in ch. 27; Finna Hrútsdóttir in ch. 39; and Finna Þormóðardóttir in ch. 98. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. 154 s.v. finnr
Fjǫlmóð, Fiǫlmóð Compare to the OW.Norse name of a masculine fictional character, Fjǫlmóðr; also compare with the Continental Germanic feminine names Filomuot, Felemoda, and the masculine name Filimuth. The OW.Norse name may be interpreted as "courageous " (from fjǫl- "full-, exceedingly-" and móðr "emotional; courageous; wrathful"). In Runic Swedish this name may be understood as a variation of names formed with a second element in -móð or -móðr and a personal name element Fiǫl-, Fjǫl- corresponding to Continental Germanic names in Filu- (< Germanic *felu- "full-, exceedingly-"). A runic example is found in the accusative case as fiul:muþ. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Fiǫlmóð(r), -móð
Fjǫrleif The first element Fjǫr- may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic fjǫr, "life, vitality". For the second element -leif see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Fjǫrleif Eyvindardóttir in ch. 72-73. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 154 s.v. fjǫr; FJ pp. 158; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Fjǫtra The name Fjǫtra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family. The name may be related to Old Icelandic fjǫturr, "fetter, shackle". All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjǫtra, Hjǫtra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV pp. 154 s.v. fjǫtra, fjǫturr
Folka Short form of feminine names in Folk-. A runic example occurs in the genitive case as fulku. NR s.v. Folka, Folk-
Folkvé, Folkví The first element Folk- is from OW.Norse folk "group of people, a group of warriors." For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as fulkui and fulukui. A short form of feminine names in Folk- is Folka. NR s.v. Folkví, Folk-, -ví
Frakokk This name appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as the name of the wife of Ljótr the Renegade of Sutherland. Frakkok was the daughter of a farmer living in the Orkneys, one Moddan. The name may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic frakka a loan word from Old English franca, a type of spear, or to the man's name Frakki. CV pp. 169 s.v. frakka, Frakki
Freydís, Frøydís The first element Frey- or Frøy- derives from Primitive Scandinavian *fraujaR "lord". As with other words in the Scandinavian languages this word became a god's name (OW.Norse Freyr; Old Danish, Old Swedish Frø), the name first element Frey- or Frøy- means in part "lord", but also signifies the god. The OW.Norse form of this name is Freydís. Found in a runic inscription in the nominative form frau×tis. The name Freydís is found in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, and in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395) for the daughter of Eiríkr rauðr. Freydís was memorable, but not likable. She stands out historically as the first European ax-murderess in the New World. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100 s.v. dís; NR s.v. Frøydís, Frøy-, -dís
Freygerðr For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Frøgerth and in OW.Norse as Freygerðr. Runic forms include the nominative case frukaþr and the genitive case fraikirþaR. This name appears in Landnámabók for Freygerðr Hrafnsdóttir in ch. 38. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerðr; NR s.v. Frøygærðr, Frøy-, -gærðr
Freygunnr For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Runic examples include nominative case fraykun and frykuþr. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Frøygunnr/-guðr, Frøy-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Freylaug For the first element Frey- see above. For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as fraylaug. NR s.v. Frøylaug, Frøy-, -laug
Fríða A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr. The first element Frið- comes from OW.Norse friðr (< Primitive Scandinavian *friðuR) "love, peace", which as a name-element may mean "protection, defense". Found in Old Danish as Fritha and in Old Swedish as Fridha, with the OW.Norse form being Fríða. May be found in a runic inscription in the nominative case as ...[e]þa and occurs in the accusative case as friþu. Cleasby-Vigfusson notes that names in Frið- were only rarely used in the Viking Age: possibly they became more popular with the advent of Christianity. FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 173 s.v. fríðr; NR s.v. Fríða, -fríðr
FriðælfR For the first element Frið- see above. For the second element -ælfR see above. Runic examples are found in the nominative case as [fr(in)þelfr] and in the accusative case as [friþelfi]. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. FriðælfR, Frið-, -ælfR, Fríða
Friðgerðr For the first element Frið- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Friðgerðr Illugadóttir in ch. 34; Friðgerðr, daughter of Kjarvalr, an Irish king, in ch. 64. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerðr; NR s.v. Fríða
Frosthildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation. The first element Frost- is related to Old Icelandic frost, "frost". For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Frostildehau (c. 1175). FJ pp. 87, 343, 349; CV pp. 174-175, 261 s.v. frost, hildr
 
G
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Name Notes Source
Gauthildr The byname gautr was originally a Swedish name element, meaning "Goth, man from Gautland, Gotlander." The Cleasby-Vigfusson dictionary notes that the masculine name Gautr is a poetical name for Óðinn, and suggests that it may mean "father". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 10; FJ pp. 348-349; CV pp. 193, 261 s.v. Gautr, hildr
Geira, GæiRa The feminine form of the name element Geir-, which is identical to the Old Icelandic geirr, "spear." A short form of feminine names in GæiR-. Occurs in the runic nominative forms [kaira] and kera. Occurs in Old Danish as Gera and in OW.Norse as Geira. Found in Landnámabók. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr, Geira; NR s.v. GæiRa, GæiR-
Geirbjǫrg For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Geirbjǫrg Bálkadóttir in ch. 19, 25, 53. A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 66, 196 s.v. bjǫrg, geirr
Geirdís For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -dís see above. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 196 s.v. dís, geirr
Geirhildr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Possibly found in Old Danish as Gerhild. Occurs in OW.Norse as Geirhildr. Occurs in the runic nominative form gaiRilt(r). This name appears in Landnámabók for Geirhildr Flókadóttir in ch. 2; Geirhildr fjǫlkunnig kona (witch) in ch. 68; and another Geirhildr in ch. 69. A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 349; CV pp. 196, 261 s.v. geirr, hildr; NR s.v. GæiRhildr, GæiR-, -hildr
Geirlaug For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Danish as Gerløgh and in OW.Norse as Geirlaug. Runic examples include nominative case gaiRlauk and accusative case kaiR[l]a[uk]. This name appears in Landnámabók for Geirlaug Þórmóðardóttir in ch. 20. A short form for Geirlaug is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 196, 374 s.v. geirr, laug def. IV; NR s.v. GæiRlaug, GæiR-, -laug
Geirlǫð For the first element Geir- see above. The second element -lǫð is identical to Old Icelandic lǫð, "bidding, invitation". A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 196, 404 s.v. geirr, lǫð
Geirný For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -ný see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Geirný, mother of Skáld-Hrafn in ch. 95. A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr; NR s.v. -ný
Geirríðr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Occurs in OW.Norse as Geirríðr. A runic nominative form is kairkiRiþ-r. This name appears in Landnámabók for Geirríðr Bægifótsdóttir in ch. 30; Geirríðr, the sister of Geirrǫðr, who married Bjǫrn Bǫlverkson blindingatrjóa ("peg-pole") in ch. 34; Geirríðr, daughter of Þórólfr bægifótr ("limp-leg"); and Geirríðr, whose mother was Þórkatla Ófeigsdóttir, in ch. 40. A short form of feminine names in GæiR- is Geira. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343, 350; CV pp. 196 s.v. geirr; NR s.v. GæiRfríðr, GæiR-, -fríðr, Fríða
Geirunnr For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -uðr or -unnr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form kaiR[uni]. NR s.v. GæiRunnr, GæiR-, -unnr/-uðr
Geirvé For the first element Geir- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms kairui, [kai]Rui and possibly the accusative form (a)iRku. NR s.v. GæiRví, GæiR-, -ví, -vér
Gerðr The name Gerðr is from Primitive Scandinavian *garðior, or may be related to Old Icelandic gerðistún, "garden". May be a feminine form of the masculine name Garðr. It is found as the name of a goddess or giantess with whom the god Freyr falls in love in the Poetic Edda, but is also found as a human name in 10th century Iceland, where it is recorded in Landnámabók for Gerðr, daughter of Kjallakr inn gamli ("the old") in ch. 27 and 32; Gerðr Bǫðvarsdóttir in ch. 55; and Gerðr Óláfsdóttir in ch. 97. Occurs only in place-names from Norway and Denmark. Also see the second element -gerðr above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 100, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerðr
Gilla Found as Old Swedish Gilla. This name is a short form of the woman's name Gillaug. A runic example has the nominative form kila. NR s.v. Gilla, Gillaug
Gillaug Found in Old Swedish as Gilløgh. The origin of the first element is uncertain: it may perhaps represent an assimilated form of the woman's name Ginnlaug, or it also may have developed from the woman's name GæiRlaug. Continental Germanic names in Gil- are assumed to be derived from Gísl-, but such assimilation seems to first appear late in Scandinavia. It is also possible that names in Gil(l)- are borrowings of Celtic name-elements; compare with OW.Norse Gilli, Gillikristr. For the second element -laug see above. There are a number of runic occurrances, including nominative case gilok, giluk, kilauh, kilauk, (k)ilauk, [kilaum], kilnuk, [kilok], kiluk and genitive case kilaua and kilauhaR. NR s.v. Gillaug, -laug
Ginna The first element Ginn- is of uncertain etymology. It may derive from a Continental Germanic name, perhaps relted to the OW.Norse verb ginna "to deceive, to enchant"; compare with the OW.Norse mythological character Ginnarr. Found in Old Swedish Ginna. Short form of the woman's name Ginnlaug. There is one runic example in the nominative case, kina. NR s.v. Ginna, Ginnlaug
Ginnlaug For the first element Ginn- see above. A short form of this name isGinna. Runic examples include the nominative forms |kinlauh, |kinla-h, kinluk, the genitive forms kinlauhaR, kinlau-aR and the accusative form ki---uku. NR s.v. Ginnlaug, Ginn-, -laug
Gísla Found in Old Danish as Gisla. This name is either a short form of Gíslaug or the feminine equivalent to the man's name Gísli. A runic inscription has the nominative form kisla. NR s.v. Gísla, Gíslaug, Gísli
Gíslaug The first element Gísl- may be related to the Langobard word gísil "arrow-shaft" and also to OW.Norse geisl "staff", geisli "sun-beam"; thus "a shaft typical of a weapon or a part of a weapon". The name may also be linked to OW.Norse gísl "hostage". For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gisløgh and in OW.Norse as Gíslaug. Runic examples include the nominative forms kislauh, kisl(a)uig, kislauk, [kislauk], [k-sluk], [-]islauh. NR s.v. Gíslaug, Gísl-, -laug
Gjaflaug The first element Gjaf-, Giaf- or Gef- is derived from Germanic *Geba-, compare with the OW.Norse verb gefa "to give" and OW.Norse gjǫf "gift", related to the stem in gjafari and gjafmildr. For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as kiafluk. Appears as the name of two women in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245), Gjaflaug Arnbjǫrnardóttir, wife of Þórleikr Hǫskuldsson, and Gjaflaug Kjallaksdóttir, wife of Bjǫrn inn austræni ("the easterner"). Gjaflaug Kjallaksdóttir is also mentioned in Landnámabók in ch. 32 and 40. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 202, 374 s.v. gjǫf, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Giaflaug, Gef-/Giaf-, -laug
Gjaflǫð For the first element Gjaf- see above. For the second element -lǫð see above. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 343; CV pp. 202, 404 s.v. gjǫf, lǫð
Greilǫð For the second element -lǫð see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 404 s.v. lǫð
Grélǫð, Grélaða For the second element -lǫð see above. In Eiríks saga rauða Grélaða appears as the wife of Earl Þórsteinn hausakljúfr ("skull-splitter"). This name appears in Landnámabók for Grélǫð, whose mother was Gróa Þórsteinsdóttir, in ch. 36; and for Grélǫð, daughter of Jarl Bjartmar in ch. 47. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 404 s.v. lǫð
Gríma The first element Grím- is related to Old Icelandic gríma, "mask", and may refer to a helm which masks the face, also Grímr was one of the names of the god Óðinn. This name appears in Landnámabók for Gríma Hallkelsdóttir in ch. 22 and ch. 28. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Gríma is the name of a Hebridean witch who practices deadly magic against Þórðr Ingunnarson and Kari Hrútsson, and is eventually put to death for her crimes by Óláfr pái ("peacock"). GB pp. 9; CV pp. 216 s.v. gríma
Grímhildr For the first element Grím- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. The name Grímhildr appears in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395), as the wife of Þórsteinn of Lysufjord. FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 216, 261 s.v. gríma, hildr
Gróa Found in Old Danish as Gro, in Old Swedish as Groa, and in OW.Norse as Gróa. This name appears in the Poetic Edda as the name of the mother of the giant Ǫrvandil (the constellation Orion), and it is also found as a human name. May be related to Swedish groda or Norse gro, "toad, paddock", or may perhaps be related to OW.Norse gróa, "to grow, to be healed of wounds". Runic examples include nominative case krua and kRrua. This name appears in Landnámabók for Gróa Þórsteinsdóttir and Gróa the daughter of Óláfr feilan ("wolf-cub") in ch. 36; Gróa Dala-Kollsdóttir in ch. 39; Gróa Þórólfsdóttur in ch. 47; Gróa Herfinnsdóttir in ch. 63; Gróa, wife of Flóki in ch. 65; Gróa in snarskyggna ("the swift-eyed") and Gróa Þórvarðsdóttir in ch. 65; Gróa Hafþórsdóttir in ch. 67; Gróa, the daughter of Þórðr illugi ("evil-mind") in ch. 83 and 84; and Gróa Vestarsdóttir in ch. 85. This name also appears for three characters in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Gróa Geirmundardóttir, who drowned with her father Geirmundr gnýr ("the noisy"); Gróa Dala-Kollsdóttir; and Gróa, daughter of Þórsteinn rauðr ("the red") and an ancestress of the Norse Earls of Orkney, who also appears in Eiríks saga rauða. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 216-217 s.v. gróa, Gróa; NR s.v. Gróa
Gudda Gudda is a short form for Guðrún. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
GuðælfR The first element Guð- and its side-form Goð- are derived from Germanic *guða "god, god-like being" and are related to Old Icelandic guð, goð, "god, the gods." The oldest form of this first element lies in the root goð, and Cleasby-Vigfusson mentions that even in late Christian poetry words in guð- were made to rhyme with o, suggesting that the pronunciation should still be as if the first element were goð-. In Iceland the pronunciation underwent further change, so that the g in Guð- is pronounced as gw in Christian names. For the second element -ælfR see above. A runic example is found in the accusative case as [kyþe=lfi]. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. CV pp. 207-208 s.v. goð; NR s.v. GuðælfR, Guð-, -ælfR
Guðbjǫrg For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðbjǫrgr, the mother of Guðbrandr kúla ("knob, hunchback") in ch. 53. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 207-208 s.v. bjǫrg, goð; NR s.v. Guð-
Guðfinna For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -finna see above. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. 154, 207-208 s.v. finnr, goð
Guðfríðr For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Guðríðr. Runic examples include nominative case [kiþfriþ], kofriþ, [kufri]?, kufriþ, [uþ(u)friþR] and dative case kuþfriþi. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Guðfríðr, Guð-, -fríðr, Fríða
Guðlaug For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gudhløgh and in OW.Norse as Guðlaug. Compare also with the woman's name Gullaug. Runic examples include the nominative forms koþlauh, [koþlauk], kuþlauh, kuþlauk, [kuþlauk], kuþluk, k[uþluk], [kuþluk], kuþrlaug, kuþrlauk, k---auk, the genitive forms kuþlaukaR, kuþuaukaR and the accusative forms kuþlah, kuþlug*u, kuþlug/kunluk. This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðlaug Arnbjarnardóttir in ch. 64; Guðlaug Hrólfsdóttir in ch. 70 and 71; Guðlaug, wife of Vestmaðr in ch. 73; and Guðlaug, daughter of Óttar hvalró ("whale-calm") in ch. 83. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form for names in Guðl- is Gulla. A short-form of Guðlaug is Lauga. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208, 374 s.v. goð, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Guðlaug, Gullaug, Guð-, -laug
Guðleif For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -leif see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðleif, daughter of Ketill smiðjudrumbr ("smithy-drum, anvil") in ch. 34. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form for names in Guðl- is Gulla. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. goð; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Guðmóð For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -móðsee above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as |kuþ(m)uþ. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Guðmóð, Guð-, -móð
Guðný For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -ný see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðný Hrafnkelsdóttir in ch. 11; Guðný Bǫðvarsdóttir in ch. 21, 64, 81, 83, 86; Guðný Hafþórsdóttir in ch. 25; Guðný Þórólfsdóttir in ch. 30; and Guðný Brynjólfsdóttir in ch. 76. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. goð; NR s.v. -ný
Guðríðr For the first element Guð-see above. The second element is -fríðr, which is derived from *friðior and related to the adjective fríðr, meaning "beloved" or "fair" (see also Guðfríðr). Appears in a Danish runic inscription, kuþfriþi, which is thought to refer to a Norwegian woman. May be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Godrida, Godrithe (c. 1109-1112), Godreda (c. 1138-1145), Guderide (c. 1138-1145), Gorreida (c. 1138-1145). This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðríðr Mársdóttir in ch. 31; Guðríðr Illugadóttir in ch. 34; Guðríðr Þórbjarnardóttir, wife of Þórsteinn Eiríksson in ch. 38; Guðríðr Þórðardóttir in ch. 71; Guðríðr Þórkellsdóttir in ch. 71; and Guðríðr Brynjólfsdóttir in ch. 76. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Guðríðr Þórsteinnsdóttir appears as the daughter of Þórsteinn surts inn spaka (Thórsteinn Black the Wise) and wife of the chieftain Þórkell trefill ("rag" or "fringe"). The name is also found in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395) and in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, for Guðríðr Þórbjarnardóttir, who assists the prophetess in Greenland by singing the Varðlokkur songs. A short form of this name is Gyða. Another short form for this name is Gudda. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 111, 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. goð; NR s.v.Fríða
Guðrún For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -rún see above. This name appears in Old Danish as Guthrun, in Old Swedish as Gudhrun and in OW.Norse as Guðrún. Runic examples include the nominative forms kuþrun and |kuþrun. This name appears in Landnámabók for Guðrún, whose mother was Þórunn in ch. 17; Guðrún, mother of Þórðr kǫttr in ch. 32; Guðrún Ósvífsdóttir in ch. 38 and 42; Guðrún Ásólfsdóttir in ch. 46; Guðrún Þórkelsdóttir in ch. 54; Guðrún, wife of Kjartan Ásgeirsson in ch. 59; Guðrún Þórsteinsdóttir in ch. 67; Guðrún wife of Heðinn Þórsteinsson in ch. 72; Guðrún, daughter of Þórarinn sælingr ("fortunate") and Guðrún Þórisdóttir in ch. 75; Guðrún Ámundadóttir in ch. 81; Guðrún, the mother of Sæmundr in ch. 92; Guðrún Kolbeinsdóttir, wife of Sæmundr fróði ("the wise") in ch. 94; and Guðrún, the grandmother of Bishop Magnús, in ch. 94. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) appears as the name of Guðrún Ósvífsdóttir, one of the central characters of the saga. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. A short form of Guðrún is Gunna. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 350-351; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 207-208, 504 s.v. goðrún; NR s.v. Guðrún, Guð-, -rún, Rúna
Guðvé, Guðví For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gudhvi and in OW.Norse as Guðvé. Runic examples include a possible nominative case |kuþui and the accusative case kuþuiu. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. NR s.v. Guðví, Guð-, -ví, -vér
Guðvǫr For the first element Guð-see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. Runic examples include the nominative form kuþuar and accusative forms kuþfar and [kuþuaru]. A short form for names in Guð- is Gufa or Gufi. NR s.v. Guðvǫr, Guð-, -vǫr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Gufa, Gufi May be an Anglo-Scandinavian formation, found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Guua (c. 1202), Guue (c. 1185-1200), Goue (c. 1218-1219). FJ pp. 113
Gulla, Gylla A short form of feminine names in Guðl-, Gull- and also a short form of the woman's name Gyríðr. Found in Old Danish as Gylla and in Old Swedish as Gulla. Runic forms include nominative case gyla, kula, [kula], k[ulha|], kyla and genitive case kylu. May be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Golle (c. 1218-1219). FJ pp. 113; NR s.v. Gulla/Gylla
Gullaug The first element Gull- is a form of the first element Guð-. Compare to the woman's name Guðlaug. For the second element -laug see above. Only occasional examples are found in Old Swedish (Gudhløgh) and OW.Norse. Runic examples include the nominative forms khulu, kulaug, kulauh, [kulauk], kulhu and the genitive form kulaug. NR s.v. Gullaug, Guðlaug, Guð-, -laug
Gulley For the first element Gull- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms khulu and kulhu . NR s.v. Gulløy, Gull-, -øy
Gunna A short form for the name Guðrún. Also a short form of feminine names in Gunn-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr. Found as Gunna in Old Danish, Old Swedish and OW.Norse. Runic examples include the nominative forms kuina, kuna, [kuna], kuno, kyna, the genitive forms gunum, kunuR, ku-u and the accusative form kunu. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Gunna, Gunn-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr
GunnælfR The first element Gunn- is derived from *gunþi and is identical with Old Icelandic gunnr, guðr, "battle." For the second element -ælfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gunnælf. Runic examples include the nominative form gunilfr[kuilfr]. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. GunnælfR, Gunn-, -ælfR, Gunna
Gunnfríðr, Gunnríðr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. May occur in Old Swedish as Gunridh, the OW.Norse form is Gunnfríðr. Occurs in the runic nominative form kunrir. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. Gunn(f)ríðr, Gunn-, -fríðr, Fríða, Gunna
Gunngifu A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation (c. 1202-1219) from the Norse name-element Gunn- and the Old English name-element -gifu. For the first element Gunn- see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Gunniue and Guniue. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. FJ pp. 114, 344; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Gunnheiðr, Gunnhæiðr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Gunhedh and in OW.Norse as Gunnheiðr. Runic examples include the nominative form guneþr and the accusative form kunaiþ-. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnhæiðr, Gunn-, -hæiðr, Gunna
Gunnhildr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Gunhild, occurs in OW.Norse as Gunnhildr. Runic examples include nominative case [kunhiltr], kunhi..., kunilr, kuniltr, (k)(u)(n)iltr, kunitr, [k]u[ni]tr, genitive case ku(n)(in)(l)(t)(a)(r) and accusative case kunilt, kunilti. Anglo-Scandinavian forms include Gunnilt, Gunnild (c. 1163-1205), Gunild (c. 1202), Gunnilda (c. 1240-1306), Gonilda (c. 1240-1306), Gunnilde (c. 1198-1205), Gunillda (c. 1202). This name is frequent in Iceland and common in Norway through the entire medieval period. Found in Danish runic inscriptions and other Danish sources. Found in a number of Swedish runic inscriptions and fairly common in later Swedish sources. Related to Continental Germanic Gundihild. This name appears in Landnámabók for Gunnhildr, wife of Kolr in ch. 20; Gunnhildr Ásláksdóttir in chs. 28 and 34; Gunnhildr Símonsdóttir in ch. 28; Gunnhildr Eiríksdóttir in ch. 59 and 61; and Gunnhildr, daughter of Ísrǫðr Hróaldsson in ch. 75. Orkneyingsaga (c. 1200) lists this as the name of one of the daughters of the Norwegian king Eiríkr blóðøx ("bloodaxe"). In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Queen Gunnhildr is the widow of Eiríkr. The name Gunnhildr also appears in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, where Queen Gunnhildr is identified as Gunnhildr Ǫzursdóttir, wife of King Eiríkr bloðøx; there are also other women in this saga with the same name, such as the daughter of Jarl Hálfdan and granddaughter of King Haraldr hárfagr ("fair-hair"); and Gunnhildr the daughter of Bjǫrn Brynjólfsson. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 114-116, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr; NR s.v. Gunnhildr, Gunn-, -hildr, Gunna
Gunnlaug For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Compare with the woman's name Guðlaug. occurs in Old Danish as Gunløgh and in OW.Norse as Gunnlaug. Runic examples include the accusative forms kuþlug, kunluk. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnlaug, Guðlaug, Gunn-, -laug, Gunna
Gunnlǫð For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -lǫð see above. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 404 s.v. gunnr, lǫð; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Gunnuðr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -uðr or -unnr see above. A runic example occurs in the nominative case as kunuþr. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnuðr, Gunn-, -unnr/-uðr, Gunna
Gunnvǫr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Gunnur, in Old Swedish as Gunnur and Gunvor, and in OW.Norse as Gunnvǫr. Runic examples include the nominative forms kunuar, kunuur, kunur, [kynuar], (u)nuaur and the accusative form kunuar. This name was borne by one of the daughters of the original settlers of Iceland. Found very frequently in Norway. Frequent in Danish where it appears as Gunnur or Latin Gunwara. This name appears in Landnámabók for Gunnvǫr, daughter of Hróðgeirr inn spaki ("the wise") in chs. 14 and 96. Anglo-Scandinavian forms include Gonnora (c. 1197), Gunnora (c. 1197-1256), Gunnewar (c. 1202-1240), Gunware (c. 1179-1202), Gunneuare, Guneuuare, Gunner (c. 1300-1400). In Normandy the wife of Richard I and others bore this name, spelled variously as Gonnor, Gunnor, Gunwera. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 118-119, 344, 351-352; CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. Gunnvǫr, Gunn-, -vǫr, Gunna
Gunnþrúðr For the first element Gunn- see above. For the second element -þrúðr see above. Occurs in Old Swedish as Gunthrudh. A runic example in the nominative case is kunþruþr. Short-forms of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr include Gunna and Gynna. NR s.v. Gunnþrúðr, Gunn-, -þrúðr, Gunna
Gyða A short form of Gyríðr or Guðríðr. ound in Old Danish as Gytha, in Old Swedish as Gydha and in OW.Norse as Gyða. Found early in Norway, where it is common. Found less frequently in Iceland. Found in two Danish runic inscriptions and common in other Danish sources. Found in a few Swedish runic inscriptions and in some later Swedish sources. Runic examples include the nominative forms gyþa, kiþa, kuþa, [kuþa]. The name Gyða appears in Landnámabók in ch. 69. Found in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, as Gyða, the sister of Arinbjǫrn hersir ("chieftain"). May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Guede, Githe (c. 1219), Gide (c. 1210-1220), Ghithe (c. 1300's). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 119-120; NR s.v. Gyða, Gyríðr
Gyðlaug For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 9; CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV
Gynna A short form of feminine names in Gunn-. Compare with the feminine name Gunna and with the Old Swedish name Gyna. Runic examples include the nominative forms kuina and kyna. NR s.v. Gynna, Gunna
Gyra Perhaps a short form of Gyríðr. May be present in the runic nominative form [kura]. NR s.v. Gyra, Gyríðr
Gyríðr, Gyðríðr Derived from Guðríðr. Short forms of this name include Gyða, Gyra and Gulla or Gylla. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 111, 119, 344, 348; CV pp. 207-208 s.v. goð
 
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Name Notes Source
Hafþóra The first element Haf- is identical with Old Icelandic haf, "sea". For the second element -þóra see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hafþóra Þórbergsdóttir in chs. 21, 55 and 89. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Halla Identical with Old Icelandic hallr, "flat stone, slab, big stone, boulder". This name appears in Landnámabók for Halla Eyjólfsdóttir in ch. 42; Halla Gestsdóttir in ch. 46; and Halla Steinólfsdóttir in ch. 48. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Halla is the daughter of Gestr Oddleisson and mother of Þórgils Holluson. The name Halla also appears in Vápnfirðinga saga as the daughter of Lýtingr Ásbjarnarson. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr
Hallabera, Hallbera For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -bera is derived from the root ber, "bear" found also in berserkr. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallbera, daughter of Úlfr inn óargi ("the virtuous") in ch. 18; Hallbera Snorradóttir in ch. 48; Hallbera, daughter of Þóroddr hjálmr ("helm") in ch. 60; and for Hallbera Ǫnundardóttir and her granddaughter Hallbera in ch. 73. In Vápnfirðinga saga, Hallbera is the daughter of Þórgerðr silfra ("the silver). GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 58, 235 s.v. bera, hallr
Hallbjǫrg For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallbjǫrg Bárðsdóttir in ch. 28. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 235 s.v. bjǫrg, hallr
Halldís For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Halldís Erpsdóttir in chs. 38 and 29; Halldís Þorgrímsdóttir in chs. 48 and 49. This name also appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, for the foster-mother of Guðríðr Þórbjarnardóttir, who taught Guðríðr the Varðlokkur songs. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 235 s.v. dís, hallr
Halldóra, Hallþóra For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -þóra or -dóra see above. The name Halldóra appears in Landnámabók for Halldóra Geirmundardóttir in ch. 12; Halldóra, daughter of Hrólfr inn auðgi ("the wealthy") in ch. 21; Halldóra Þórhallsdóttir in ch. 39; Halldóra Steinmóðsdóttir in chs. 40 and 98; Halldóra Gunnsteinsdóttir in ch. 68; Halldóra, daughter of Þórkell svarti ("the black") in ch. 72; Halldóra, whose mother was Hallbera Ǫnundardóttir, in ch. 73; Halldóra Einarsdóttir in ch. 75; Halldóra, daughter of Ormr ánauðgi ("oppressed") in ch. 92; Halldóra, wife of Bishop Magnús Gissurarson in ch. 99. A short form of Halldóra is Dóra. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 235, 743 s.v. hallr, Þórr
Hallerna For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -erna is identical to the Old Icelandic adjective ern, "brisk, vigorous". GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 133, 235 s.v. ern, hallr
Hallfríðr For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Related to the Old Swedish name Halffred, occurs in OW.Norse as Hallfríðr. May occur in the runic genitive form halfr.... This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallfríðr Þorbjarnardóttir in chs. 38 and 39; and for Hallfríðr Egilsdóttir in ch. 75. Hallfríðr Egilsdóttir, wife of Þórkell Geitirsson, appears in Vápnfirðinga saga. Hallfríðr Snorradóttir, mother of Bishop Þórlakr, appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, and in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395). A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 9; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr, Fríða
Hallgerðr For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallgerðr Tungu-Oddsdóttir in chs. 20 and 51; Hallgerðr snúinbrók Hǫskuldsdóttir in chs. 38 and 39; Hallgerðr Ǫrnólfsdóttir in ch. 46; Hallgerðr, wife of Steinn inn danski ("the Dane") in ch. 46; Hallgerðr Vermundardóttir in ch. 48; and Hallgerðr Hólmsteinsdóttir in ch. 77. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Hallgerðr langbrók ("long-legs") is the daughter of Hǫskuldr Dala-Kollsson. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 235 s.v. Gerðr, hallr
Hallgríma For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -gríma see above. FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 216, 235 s.v. gríma, hallr
Hallkatla For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -katla see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallkatla Bjarnardóttir in ch. 46. A woman named Hallkatla appears in Vápnfirðinga saga, daughter of Þiðrandi. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 235, 337 s.v. hallr, ketill
Hallótta For the first element Hall- see above. The second element -ótta is probably related to Old Icelandic ótti, "terror, fear, dread". GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 345; CV pp. 235, 473 s.v. hallr, ótti
Hallveig For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -veig see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hallveig Fróðadóttir in ch. 9; Hallveig Einarsdóttir in ch. 28; Hallveig Þórgrímsdóttir in ch. 39; Hallveig Oddadóttir in ch. 44; Hallveig Bjarnardóttir in ch. 92; and Hallveig Þórviðardóttir in chs. 95 and 97. Hallveig, the daughter of Einarr of Laugarbrekka and mother of Guðríðr Þórbjarnardóttir, appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 235, 690 s.v. hallr, veig; NR s.v. -væig
Hallvǫr For the first element Hall- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 351-352; CV pp. 235 s.v. hallr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Hálma   GB pp. 11
Haurlaug The first element Haur- is from Primitive Scandinavian *haburaR, "buck, he-goat". For the second element -laug see above. A runic example occurs in the accusative case as haurlau. NR s.v. Haurlaug, Haur-, -laug
Heðindís, Hiðindís The first element Heðin- or Hiðin- is of disputed origin. The masculine name Heðinn/Hiðinn may have come into Scandinavia from the Hjaðning sagas. There is a discrepancy in pronunciation between medieval West Scandinavian and medieval East Scandinavian forms and hitherto there has not been a satisfactory explanation. The OW.Norse form with /e/ is assumed to have been formed along the pattern of OW.Norse heðinn "fur, pelt", but the discrepancy between the East Scandinavian /i/ and the West Scandinavian /e/ may also be explained as normal sound differences. The Viking Age runic examples seems to occur both as /i/ and /e/. Found in Old Swedish as Hidhindis. Runic examples in the nominative case include haþintis and hiþintis. NR s.v. Heðin-/Hiðindís, Heðin-/Hiðin-, -dís
Heðinfast For the first element Heðin- or Hiðin- see above. For the second element fast- or -fǫst see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms hiþinfast and [hiþinfast]. NR s.v. Heðin-/Hiðinfast, Heðin-/Hiðin-, -fast/-fǫst
Heðingunnr For the first element Heðin- or Hiðin- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form hiþinkun. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Heðin-/Hiðingunnr, Heðin-/Hiðin-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Heðinvé For the first element Heðin- or Hiðin- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form iþinui. NR s.v. Heðin-/Hiðinví, Heðin-/Hiðin-, -ví, -vér
Heiðr Identical to Old Icelandic heiðr, "heath". Occurs as the name of a vǫlva or prophetess in Vǫluspá as well as a human name element. This name appears in Landnámabók for Heiðr vǫlva ("prophetess") in ch. 56. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 247 s.v. heiðr
Heilvé, Hæilví The first element Hæil- or Heil- is from OW.Norse heill "happiness, luck" or the OW.Norse adjective heill "happy, lucky". For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Swedish as Helvi (this example from Gotland). Occurs in the runic nominative form [haili]. NR s.v. Hæilví, Hæil-, -ví, -vér
Heimlaug, Hæimlaug The first element Heim- or Hæim- is from OW.Norse heimr "home".For the second element -laug see above. Appears in OW.Norse as Heimlaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form [imlauk]. This name appears in Landnámabók for Heimlaug Þórarinsdóttir in ch. 95. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 249, 374 s.v. heima, laug def. IV; NR s.v. Hæimlaug, Hæim-, -laug
Hekja The name Hekja appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, as the name of a Scottish bondswoman sent by Karlsefni to reconnoitre Vinland. GB pp. 11
Helga, Hælga Occurs in Old Danish as Helgha, in Old Swedish as Hælgha, and in OW.Norse as Helga. This name is the feminine equivalent to the man's name Helgi, from the OW.Norse adjective heilagr "holy", during heathen times with the meaning "dedicated to the gods". Runic examples include the nominative forms elha, elka, halha, he(l)ga, helka, hlga, hlka, [ilka] and the genitive forms helgu, hlku. This popular name appears in Landnámabók for Helga Arnardóttir in chs. 3 and 5; Helga Þórðardóttir in chs. 10 and 21; Helga Þórgeirsdóttir in ch. 25; Helga Ǫnundardóttir in ch. 28; Helga Kjallaksdóttir in ch. 30; Helga, the wife of Ásmundr Þórgestsson in ch. 30; Helga Steinsdóttir in ch. 31; Helga Óláfsdóttir in ch. 40; Helga, daughter of Áni bogsveigir ("bow-swayer, archer"); Helga Þórisdóttir in ch. 54; Helga Helgadóttir in ch. 70; Helga Þórgeirsdóttir in ch. 73; Helga Bjarnardóttir in ch. 75; Helga Hólmsteinsdóttir in ch. 77; Helga Þórðardóttir in chs. 81 and 99; Helga Ásgeirsdóttir in ch. 89; Helga Ǫnundardóttir in ch. 92; Helga Hrólfsdóttir in chs. 92 and 94; Helga Ormsdóttir in ch. 97; Helga Þrándardóttir in ch. 98; and Helga Jónsdóttir in ch. 100. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Helga is the name of the daughter of Óláfr feilan ("wolf-cub"). In Hænsa-Þóris saga the name Helga appears for the wife of Gunnar Lífarson. Helga in fagra ("the fair") appears in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu, the daughter of Þórsteinn Egilsson and granddaughter of Egill Skallagrímsson. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 254-255 s.v. Helgi, helga; NR s.v. Hælga
Helgunnr The first element Helg- or Hælg- is from the OW.Norse adjective heilagr, "holy," or may be adapted from the names Helga/Hælga, Helgi/Hælgi. Occurs in the runic nominative form helgun. NR s.v. Hælgunnr, Hælg-, -unnr/-uðr
Herborg The first element Her- or Hær- comes from Germanic *harjaz and is related to Old Icelandic herr, "army, military force". The side-form Heri- or Hæri- appears before non-palatal vowels. For the second element -borg see above. FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66. 258 s.v. bjǫrg, herr
Herdís For the first element Her see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Herdís, mother of Steins skáld in ch. 32; Herdís Bolladóttir in ch. 38; Herdís Tindsdóttir in ch. 48; and Herdís Þórðardóttir in chs. 60 and 64. Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) also mentions Herdís Bolladóttir. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 258 s.v. dís, herr
Herfríðr, Herríðr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herfríðr, Herríðr. Occurs in the runic nominative form (h)[a]rfri[þr]. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Hærfríðr, Hær-, -fríðr, Fríða
Hergerðr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 258, 344, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. herr, Gerðr
Hergunnr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 258 s.v. gunnr, herr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Herleif For the first element Her see above. For the second element -leif or -læif see above. May occur in Old Danish as Herlef. Occurs in the runic nominative form [harlaif]. NR s.v. Hærlæif, Hær-, -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Herríðr, Herfríðr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herfríðr, Herríðr. Occurs in the runic nominative form (h)[a]rfri[þr]. This name appears in Landnámabók for Herríðr Gautsdóttir in ch. 40. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 258 s.v. herr; NR s.v. Hærfríðr, Hær-, -fríðr, Fríða
Hervǫr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hervǫr, whose mother was Þórgerðr Eylaugsdóttir, in ch. 10. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 351-352; CV pp. 258 s.v. herr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Herþrúðr For the first element Her see above. For the second element -þrúðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Herþrúðr. occurs in the runic nominative form harþruþr. This name appears in Landnámabók for Herþrúðr Breiðardóttir in ch. 28 and Herþrúðr Illugadóttir in ch. 34. The short form for names in -þrúða is Þrúða. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV p. 258, 747 s.v. herr, Þrúðr, Þrúða; NR s.v. Hærþrúðr, Hær-, -þrúðr
Hildibjǫrg The first element Hildi- or Hild- (used before a vowel) come from *heldioR, "battle" and are related to Old Icelandic hildr, "battle". For the second element -bjǫrg see above. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 66, 261 s.v. bjǫrg, hildr
Hildigerðr, Hildegærdh, Hildigard For the first element Hildi- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. Only one instance of this name occurs in West Scandinavia, where it is used for a fictional character. However, the name is recorded in Sweden as Hildegærdh, and in Denmark as Hildigard. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. FJ pp. 141, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hildigunnr For the first element Hildi- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hildigunnr, wife of Sigmundr Ketilsson, in ch. 28. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. 221, 261 s.v. gunnr, hildr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Hildiríðr For the first element Hildi- see above. Hildr or Hilda may be used as short forms for names in Hild-. The second element -ríðr is of uncertain origin. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 350; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hildr, Hilda See Hildi-, above. This name may also be used as a short-form of other names in Hild-. The name Hildr is used for one of the Valkyries, but is also a very common woman's name in Norway and Iceland during the Viking Age. It is also recorded in Sweden and Denmark. The name Hilda appears in Landnámabók for Hilda stjarna ("star") Þórvaldsdóttir in ch. 23 and Hilda Þráinsdóttir in ch. 67. The form Hildr also appears in Landnámabók for Hildr in mjóva ("the slim") Hǫgnadóttir in ch. 40; Hildr Hermundardóttir in ch. 59; Hildr, sister of Ketill þistill ("thistle"), in ch. 74; Hildr Ásbjarnardóttir and her granddaughter Hildr Þórisdóttir in ch. 85; and Hildr Baugsdóttir in ch. 91. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Hildr is the baby daughter of Þórsteinn surts inn spaka (Thórsteinn Black the Wise) and is killed in the family drowning in Breidafjǫrd. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 140, 344; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Hjalmdís The first element Hjálm- is identical with Old Icelandic hjálmr, helm, helmet". For the second element -dís see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form hialmtis. NR s.v. Hialmdís, Hialm-, -dís
Hjálmgerðr For the first element Hjálm- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 266-267 s.v. Gerðr, hjálmr
Hjalmlaug, Hialmlaug For the first element Hjálm- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms hielmlaug and hielmlauk. NR s.v. Hialmlaug, Hialm-, -laug
Hjálp, Hjǫlp Originally a by-name related to Old Icelandic hjǫlp, "help". Recorded in West Scandinavia at the time of the Landnám. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Helperby, Heolperbi, Hilprebe, Ilprebi, Helprebi, Helperthorpe. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 141-142
Hjǫrdís The first element Hjǫr- is identical to Old Icelandic hjǫrr, "a sword". For the second element -dís see above. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 268 s.v. dís, hjǫrr
Hjǫtra The name Hjǫtra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family. All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjǫtra, Hjǫtra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames.  
Hlaðgunnr For the second element -gunnr see above. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. CV pp. 221 s.v. gunnr; NR s.v. -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Hleið The name Hleið appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the sister of King Goðmundr.  
Hlíf, Líf Originally a by-name. From OW.Norse hlíf "defense, protection; byrnie, shield" and related to Old Icelandic hlífa, "to give shelter, to cover" and to hlífð, "defence, protection". The form Líf may be Hlíf with the initial h lost, or it may be related to Old Icelandic líf, "life". This name appears in Landnámabók for Hlíf hestageldir ("horse-gelder") in ch. 27; Hlíf, mother of Gunnar Hlífarson in ch. 40; Hlíf Hrólfsdóttir in ch. 66; and Hlíf Heðinsdóttir in ch. 68. The name Líf appears only in mythology. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 188; CV pp. 271 s.v. hlífa, hlífð
Hlífhildr The first element Hlíf- is from OW.Norse hlíf "defense, protection; byrnie, shield". For the second element -hildr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative forms lifilt and lif.... NR s.v. Hlífhildr, Hlíf-, -hildr
Hlífey For the first element Hlíf- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form lifayaR. NR s.v. Hlíføy, Hlíf-, -øy
Hlín Usually found as a goddess-name, a wife of Óðinn, also in a large number of poetic compounds meaning "woman" such as hrínga-hlín, bauga-hlín, "ring-lady". The root comes from Old Icelandic hleina, "to save, defend," which is related to Old English hlæna and modern English "lean". The related noun hlein is used of the upright warp-weighted loom, which is leaned against a wall in use. CV pp. 270, 271 s.v. Hlín, hleina, hlein
Holma Short form of feminine names in Holm-. Runic examples occur in the nominative forms hulma, [hulma], -(u)(l)mahulmu. NR s.v. Holma, Holm-
Holmdís The first element Hólm- is identical to OW.Norse hólmr, "island". For the second element -dís see above. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as [hulmntis], hulmtis, [hulmtis], in the genitive case as hulmtis and in the accusative case as hulmtisi. NR s.v. Holmdís, Holm-, -dís
Hólmfríðr For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Holmfrith, in Old Swedish as Holmfridh and in OW.Norse as Hólmfríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms [holmfrþ], hulfriþ, hulmfriR, hulmfriþ, h(u)lmfriþ, hu(l)(m)(f)riþ, [hu](l)mfriþ, [hulmfriþ], hulmfriþr, hulm×fri..., hulmriþ, humfriþr, hum(f)riþr, ulm×f(r)[in](R), ulmfris, [ulmfriþ], -hulf(r)iþ, the genitive forms hulmfiþaR, h[u]lmfriþaR and the accusative forms hulmfriþi, hulmf-iþi. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 280-281 s.v. hólmr; NR s.v. Holmfríðr, Holm-, -fríðr, Fríða
Hólmgerðr For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Holgerth and in Old Swedish as Holmgærdh. Runic examples include the nominative forms (h)ulker, [hulm]kir, hulmkirþr. NR s.v. Holmgærðr, Holm-, -gærðr
Hólmlaug For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in OW.Norse as Hólmlaug. Runic examples include nominative forms [holmlauk], hulmlauk U461, hulmnlauk, hu..., [h...luk] and the genitive form hulmlaukaR. NR s.v. Holmlaug, Holm-, -laug
Holmvé For the first element Holm- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form hulmnui. NR s.v. Holmví, Holm-, -ví, -vér
Hrafnhildr, Rafnhildr The first element Hrafn- is identical with Old Icelandic hrafn, "raven". For the second element -hildr see above. A few instances of this name are recorded in West Scandinavia. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hrafnhildr Ketilsdóttir in ch. 90 and Hrafnhildr Stórólfsdóttir in chs. 90 and 91. The name Hrafnhildr appears in the legendary saga Ǫrvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Oddr. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Rauenhilbanc (c. 1209), Rauenylridding (c. 1320). GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 212, 349; CV pp. 261, 281 s.v. hildr, hrafn
Hrefna Found in OW.Norse as Hrefna. This name represents a feminine form of OW.Norse hrafn "raven" or corresponds to the masculine name Hrafn. Compare with hrefna "female raven" in Modern Icelandic. Occurs in the runic nominative form hribno. Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Hrefna Ásgeirsdóttir, the daughter of Ásgeirr æðikollr ("the hot-head") and wife of Kjartan. Hrefna Ásgeirsdóttir is also mentioned in chs. 39 and 53 of Landnámabók. GB pp. 11; CV pp. 281 s.v. hrafn; NR s.v. Hræfna, Hrafn
Hrímhildr The first element Hrím- is probably identical to Old Icelandic hrím, "frost, rime, ice". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 285-286 s.v. hildr, hrím
Hróða A short form of feminine names in Hróð- Occurs in the runic nominative form hruþa. NR s.v. Hróða, Hróð-
Hróðgerða, Hróðgærða The first element Hróð- is from OW.Norse hróðr "praise, fame," which is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *hróþiR. The second element -gerða represents a weak side-form of the second element -gærðr or -gerðr (see above). Compare with OW.Norse Hróðgerðr. Occurs in the runic nominative form roþkerþa. NR s.v. Hróðgærða, Hróð-, -gærða
Hróðlaug For the first element Hróð- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form [hrulauhar]. NR s.v. Hróðlaug, Hróð-, -laug
Hróðný For the first element Hróð- see above. For the second element -ný see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Hróðný Ketilsdóttir in ch. 30; Hróðný Illugadóttir in ch. 46; Hróðný Skeggjadóttir in ch. 55; and Hróðný Unadóttir in ch. 58. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 287 s.v. hróðr; NR s.v. -ný
Hróðþjóð For the first element Hróð- see above. The second element -þjóð, -þjúð, or -þiúð is from OW.Norse þjóð "folk, people." The name Hróðþjóð occurs in medieval Gotlandic runic inscriptions as well as in the runic genitive form roþiauþar and the accusative form roþiauþ. NR s.v. Hróðþiúð, Hróð-, -þiúð
Hróðvé For the first element Hróð- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Swedish as Rodhvi. Occurs in the runic nominative form ruþui. NR s.v. Hróðví, Hróð-, -ví, -vér
Huld, Hulda From Old Icelandic Huld, the name of a giantess, related to hulda, "hiding, secrecy". Often found in the sagas as a name of a seið-kona or witch, which may indicate that this was not a name actually used for humans but only appeared in a fictional sense to indicate a villainess, as in Ynglingasaga. CV pp. 292 s.v. Huld, hulda
Húngerðr The first element Hún- is of doubtful origin, but may be identical to Old Icelandic húnn, "bear-cub" or perhaps be derived from Primitive Scandinavian *hun, "high". For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Húngerðr Þóroddsdóttir in chs. 20 and 86. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197 s.v. Gerðr
Húnhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation. For the first element Hún- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Hunildehus (c. 1200). FJ pp. 145, 344, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
 
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Name Notes Source
Iðunn Iðunn was the wife of the god of poetry, Bragi, and was herself the keeper of the golden apples which were the food of the gods. Found also as a human name in Landnámabók, where it is used for Iðunn Molda-Gnúpsdóttur in chs. 14 and 86 and Iðunn Hámundardóttir in ch. 67. GB pp. 12; CV pp. 313 s.v. Iðunn
Ígulfríðr The first element Ígul- may be derived from OW.Norse ígull "sea-urchin", but nevertheless probably has an original sense of "hedgehog". For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Iulfrith. Runic examples include the nominative forms [ikulfriþ] and hulf(r)iþ. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Ígulfríðr, Ígul-, -fríðr, Fríða
Inga A short form of names in Ing-, Ingi-. This name is very common is Swedish and Danish, and probably spread from there to Norway in the 1200's, where it then became fairly common. Occurs in Old Danish, Old Swedish and in OW.Norse as Inga. Runic examples include nominative case ika, in(k)a, [ika], inka, [inka], genitive case ikur, ikuR, inku, and one example in which the case is uncertain, iku. Found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Inga (c. 1160) and Ynga (c. 1202). GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 149; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Inga, Ing(in)-
Ingibjǫrg, Ingeborg, Ingeberg The first elementes Ing- (found before a vowel), Ingi- (used before a consonant), Ingin- and Ingv- are derived from Germanic *Ingwia-, compounded with the second element of belonging, -ia-, to form Germanic *Ingwaz, which is assumed to be the name of a Germanic god who the person worshipped, nevertheless there is no direct proof. This name element may be related to other words of Indo-European origin, such as Greek encox, "lance, staff" in a meaning related perhaps to male genitalia, since the name is also thought to be associated with the god Ingvi-Freyr. Alternately the name may indicate national origin from the Germanic *ingwianiz, "Ingaevones" (Latin inguaeones, ingaeuones) described by Pliny and Tacitus, who describe this people as a coastal Germanic tribe who took their name from that of a mythical person from which the tribe sprang (heros eponymos). For the second element -bjǫrg or -borg see above. Found in Old Danish as Ingiburgh, in Old Swedish as Ingeborgh and in OW.Norse as Ingibjǫrg or Ingibiǫrg. Runic examples include the nominative forms inkiber, inkiberh, inki:burk. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ingibjǫrg Ásbjarnardóttir in chs. 23, 38 and 55; Ingibjǫrg Gilsdóttir in ch. 40; Ingibjǫrg Rauðsdóttir in ch. 63; and Ingibjǫrg Hróðgeirsdóttir in ch. 75. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) Ingibjǫrg Finnsdóttir is the wife of Earl Þórfinnr and mother of Paul and Erlend. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Princess Ingibjǫrg is the sister of King Óláfr Tryggvasson of Norway and a friend of Kjartan. Another Ingibjǫrg appears in Vápnfirðinga saga, daughter of Hróðgeirr inn hvíta ("the white"). The name Ingibjǫrg appears in the legendary saga Ǫrvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the name of Hjalmar's beloved. This name appears as well in the legendary saga Egils saga einhenda og Asmundar saga berserkjabana, c. 1300, as the mother of Egill einhenda ("one-hand"). Ingibjǫrg also appears in the legendary saga Helga þáttr Þórissonar, c. 1390, as the daughter of King Goðmundr. Ingibjǫrg in fagra ("the fair") is the wife of Friðþjóf inn frækna ("the brave") in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. A short form of Ingibjǫrg is Imba. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 66, 313-314 s.v. bjǫrg, Ingi; NR s.v. Ingibiǫrg, Ing(in)-, -biǫrg/-borg
Ingiøy For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ingø. Occurs in the runic nominative form inkiu. NR s.v. Ingiøy, Ing(in)-, -øy
Ingifríðr, Ingiriðr, Ingriðr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found fairly frequently in Danish (for example in the Latinized form Ingifridis) as well as in Swedish. Forms in Ingiriðr are very common in Norway but less so in Iceland, and are also recorded in Danish and Swedish. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingifrith and in Old Swedish as Ingefridh. Runic examples include the nominative forms hikifriþr, [inkifriþ], genitive forms [ikifriþ--], RkRkriþnr and the accusative form ik[in]friþi. Ingifríðr may be found in the Anglo-Scandinavian forms Ingefrit (c. 1185) and Ingefrid, while Ingiriðr may be the root of names such as Ingeride (c. 1163), Ingerithe, Ingerith (c. 1218), Ingrede, Ingretha (c. 1214). This name appears in Landnámabók for Ingiríðr Kjartansdóttir in ch. 59. Ingiriðr Þórkelsdóttir appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as a widow on the Isle of Man who marries Sveinn Ásleifarson. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. FJ pp. 150, 151, 343, 344, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Ingifríðr, Ing(in)-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ingigerðr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingigerth, in Old Swedish as Ingegærdh and in OW.Norse as Ingigerðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms igikeR, ikiker, ikik(e)r, ikikiarþ, ikikirþ, inkikar, inkik[h]r, inkikieþr, in[k]ik[in]r, inkikirþ, inkikirþr, accusative forms ikikerþi, inkikiari, and a form in which the case is uncertain, inkikiar. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ingigerðr, sister of King Dagstyggr in ch. 63. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) Ingigerðr Óláfsdóttir appears as the sister of Sveinn Ásleifarson and is married to Þórbjǫrn Clerk and later to Þórfinnr Brúsason of Stronsay. The name Ingigerðr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar for three women, the daughter of King Hergeirr, the daughter of Hreggvid, and the daughter of Kollr. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 313-314 s.v. Gerðr, Ingi; NR s.v. Ingigærðr, Ing(in)-, -gærðr
Ingigunnr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form as inkikuni. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Ingigunnr, Ing(in)-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Ingilborg Christian. See Engilborg above. GB pp. 12; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjǫrg
Ingilaug For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ingeløgh. Runic examples include the nominative forms ikilauh and ikiluk. NR s.v. Ingilaug, Ing(in)-, -laug
Ingileif For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -leif, -læif, -lǫf see above. Occurs in Old Swedish as Ingelef and in OW.Norse as Ingileif. Runic examples include the nominative forms [ikilaif], ikilef, [iku]lef. A few instances of this name are recorded in Iceland, and it is common in Norway from the 900's onward. It is found in Sweden as well, but not in Denmark. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ingileif Ásbjarnardóttir in ch. 77. An Anglo-Scandinavian form may be found in the Latinized Ingolieva (c. 1180-1200). A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 150, 344, 350; CV pp. 313-314 s.v. Ingi; NR s.v. Ingilæif, Ing(in)-, -læif/-lǫf
Ingimóð For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -móðsee above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingimoth and in Old Swedish as Ingemodh. Found in the runic nominative form inkimoþ. A short form of feminine names in -móð is Moda. NR s.v. Ingimóð, Ing(in)-, -móð
Ingirún For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -rún see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ingerun. Runic examples include the nominative forms ikirun, [ikirun], [iskirun] and the genitive form [iki]runaR. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. NR s.v. Ingirún, Ing(in)-, -rún, Rúna
Ingiveldr Ingveldr, Ingvildr, Ingvǫldr For the first element Ingi- see above. The second element in these names seems to be from vald, "might, power". A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314, 675, 721 s.v. Ingi, valda, vǫldugr
Ingiþóra For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -þóra see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms [igiþur-], ikiþora, [ikiþur-], the genitive forms ikiþoru, ikiþoruR and the accusative forms inkiþuru, ink-[þu]ru. NR s.v. Ingiþóra, Ing(in)-, -þóra
Ingríðr For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Ingirith, in Old Swedish as Ingridh and in OW.Norse as Ingiríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms ainkriþ, ikriþ, ikriþr, infri[þ], inkriþ, [in]riþr. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Ingríðr, Ing(in)-, -fríðr, Fríða
Inguðr, Ingunn For the first element Ingi- see above. For the second element -uðr or -unnr see above. The name Inguðr appears in Landnámabók for Inguðr, wife of Ásbjǫrn Arnórsson in ch. 28. The form Ingunnr is also found in Landnámabók for Ingunnr Þórólfsdóttir in ch. 74 and Ingunnr, wife of Ketill hængr in ch. 90. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Ingunn Þórolfsdóttir is the wife of Glúmr Geirason and mother of Þórðr Ingunnarson. A short form of names in Ingi- is Inga. GB pp. 12; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 313-314, 655 s.v. Ingi, unnr
Ísgerðr The first element Ís- is probably from Old Icelandic íss, "ice on sea or water". For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ísgerðr Þórsteinsdóttir in ch. 46 and Ísgerðr Hunda-Steinardóttir in ch. 55. The name Ísgerðr appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the daughter of King Hlǫðver who married King Hergeirr. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 319 s.v. Gerðr, íss
Isibel Christian, Isobel GB pp. 12
Ísǫnd Celtic, Yseult GB pp. 12
 
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Name Notes Source
Jarðrúðr, Jarþrúðr The first element seems to be from the stem of Old Icelandic jǫrðr, genitive jarðar, "earth". For the second element -þrúðr see above. The short form for names in -þrúða is Þrúða. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 154; CV p. 747 s.v. Þrúðr, Þrúða
Járngerðr The first element Járn- is identical with Old Icelandic járn, "iron". For the second element -gerðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Járngerðr Þórarinsdóttir in ch. 29; and Járngerðr Ljótsdóttir in ch. 83. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 344, 349; CV pp. 197, 325 s.v. Gerðr, járn
Jódís The first element Jó- or Ió- comes from OW.Norse jór (derived from Germanic *ehwaz) "horse". For the second element -dís see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Jódís Illugadóttir in ch. 34; Jódís Snǫrtardóttir in ch. 42; and Jódís Þórarinsdóttir in ch. 46. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 326 s.v. dís, jór
Jófast For the first element Jó- or Ió- see above. Runic examples include the nominative case iofast and accusative case iofastu. For the second element -fast or -fǫst see above. NR s.v. Iófast, Ió-, -fast/-fǫst
Jófríðr For the first element Jó- or Ió- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Jófríðr or Jóríðr. Occurs in the runic nominative form iufriþ. This name appears in Landnámabók for Jófríðr Gunnarsdóttir in chs. 20, 40 and 86 and Jófríðr Tungu-Oddsdóttir in chs. 20 and 26. Jófríðr Tungu-Oddsdóttir also appears in Hænsa-Þóris saga. Jófríðr Gunnardóttir is also mentioned in Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 326 s.v. jór; NR s.v. Iófríðr, Ió-, -fríðr, Fríða
Jǫfurfast, Jǫfurfǫst The first element Jǫfur- or Iǫfur- comes from OW.Norse jǫfurr, which is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *eburaR "prince", figuratively from "wild boar". For the second element -fast or -fǫst see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms iafurfast, iafurfost, iufrfast, iufurfast, iufurfas[t], iufur[-ast], the genitive form iufurfast and the accusative forms iafa=ur=k=ut=fast, [iufirfast]. NR s.v. Iǫfurfast/-fǫst, Iǫfur-, -fast/-fǫst
Jǫfurfríðr, Iǫfurfríðr For the first element Jǫfur- or Iǫfur- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms [iafurfriþ...] and iyfur*firþ. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Iǫfurfríðr, Iǫfur-, -fríðr, Fríða
Jóhanna Christian, Joanna. A short form for Jóhanna is Jóka. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Jóka Jóka is a short form for Jóhanna. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Jólinn   GB pp. 12
Jóra This name appears in Landnámabók for Jóra Helgadóttir in ch. 46 and Jóra Harradóttir in ch. 55. GB pp. 12
Jóreiðr The first element Jór- is derived from *ebura, "wild boar" and related to Old Icelandic jǫfurr, "king, prince, warrior", from the custom of wearing a boar crest on the helm. For the second element -eiðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Jóreiðr Ǫlvisdóttir in ch. 22; Jóreiðr Tindsdóttir in ch. 28; Jóreiðr Þiðrandadóttir in chs. 81 and 83; and Jóreiðr, mother of Ari prests hins fróði ("the wise priest") in ch. 83. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 247, 326 s.v. heiðr, jór
Jórhildr Possibly an Anglo-Scandinavian formation. For the first element Jór- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Occurs in the runic accusative form [in]orilt-. May be represented in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Joril, Jorild (c. 1202). FJ pp. 158, 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 347 s.v. hildr, jǫfurr; NR s.v. Iórhildr, Iór-, -hildr
Jórunnr For the first element Jór- see above. For the second element -uðr or -unnr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Jórunn. Runic examples include the nominative forms iaurun, iurun, -(u)(r)(u)(n), the genitive form [io]runa and the accusative forms iuruni, (in)u(r)un(in). This name appears in Landnámabók for Jórunn Helgadóttir in ch. 20; Jórunn Þormóðardóttir in ch. 21; Jórunn Einarsdóttir in ch. 29; Jórunn Ingimundardóttir in chs. 55 and 56; Jórunn, mother of Hallr prestr ("priest"), in ch. 83; Jórunn manvitsbrekka ("slope of man's wit") Ketilsdóttir in ch. 85; Jórunn, wife of Hafr-Bjǫrn, in ch. 86; Jórunn Hjaltadóttir in ch. 94; Jórunn, sister of Grímr lǫgsǫgumaðr ("law-speaker") in ch. 95; and Jórunn Ǫlvisdóttir in ch. 98. This name appears twice in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Jórunn Bjǫrnsdottíir is the wife of Hǫskuldr Dala-Kollsson; and Jórunn manvitsbrekka. Another Jórunn appears as the wife of Oddr Onundarson in Hænsa-Þóris saga. There is also a Jórunn in Vápnfirðinga saga, Jórunn Einarsdóttir. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 347 s.v. jǫfurr; NR s.v. Iórunnr, Iór-, -unnr/-uðr
Jutta   GB pp. 12
 
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Name Notes Source
Kaðlín Celtic, Kathleen. This name appears in Landnámabók for Kaðlín, the daughter of Gǫngu-Hrólfr (Rollo), in ch. 32. GB pp. 12
Kára   GB pp. 12
Kata "Kate". Kata is a short-form for the name Katrín. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Káta Káta (feminine name). Feminine equivalent to the masculine name Káti, which is from the OW.Norse adjective kátr "glad, cheerful". Runic examples include the nominative form kata and the accusative form katu. NR s.v.
Katla See -katla, above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Katla, mother of Þórgrímr Kǫtluson, in ch. 46. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
Katrín Christian, Cathrine. The short form of Katrín is Kata. GB pp. 12; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
KetilalfR, KætilælfR The first element Ketil- or Kætil- is from OW.Norse ketill, originally "kettle" but meaning also "helmet" or "chieftain with helmet." For the second element -ælfR see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketilelf. Occurs in the runic nominative form kitelfR. NR s.v. KætilælfR, Kætil-, -ælfR
Ketiley For the first element Ketil- or Kætil- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. Found in Old Swedish as Kætilø. Runic examples include nominative case katily, ketilau, [ketilau], [ketilu], [kitilau] and genitive case ketilyaR. NR s.v. Kætiløy, Kætil-, -øy
Ketilgerðr For the first element Ketil- or Kætil- see above. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. Runic examples include nominative case ketilkir and possibly accusative case netilkiarþi. NR s.v. Kætilgærðr, Kætil-, -gærðr
Ketillaug For the first element Ketil- or Kætil- see above. For the second element -laug or the weak side-form -lauga see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketilløgh, in Old Swedish as Kætilløgh, and in OW.Norse s Ketillaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form kitiluha. NR s.v. Kætillaug/-lauga, Kætil-, -laug
Ketilríðr For the first element Ketil- or Kætil- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Ketilfrith, in Old Swedish as Kætilfridh, and in OW.Norse as Ketilríðr. Occurs in the runic nominative forms kitilfiriþR and kit:itf[riþ]. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 349, 350; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill, NR s.v. Kætilfríðr, Kætil-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ketilvé For the first element Ketil- or Kætil- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples include nominative forms katilui, katil×ui, ketilu[in], |kitilui, [kiti]lui, [kitilui]. NR s.v. Kætilví, Kætil-, -ví
Kitta Kitta is a short-form for the name Kristín. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Kjalvǫr The first element in these names comes from Old Icelandic kjǫlr, genitive kjalar, "keel", a term also used of the mountains that divide Norway from Sweden, and for the spine of a book. For the second element -vǫr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Kjalvǫr, the maternal aunt of Tungu-Oddr in chs. 20 and 51. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 351-352; CV pp. 341 s.v. kjǫlr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Kolbrún The first element Kol- is identical with Old Icelandic kol, "coals, black as coal". Found as a nickname. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 81, 347 s.v. brún, kol, Kolbrún; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolfinna For the first element Kol- see above. For the second element -finna see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Kolfinna, daughter of Illugi inn svarti ("the black") in chs. 25 and 59; Kolfinna Hallsdóttir in ch. 60; and Kolfinna Hængsdóttir in ch. 90. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 154, 347 s.v. finnr, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolfrosta For the first element Kol- see above. The second element -frost is related to Old Icelandic frost, "frost". This name appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the name of the mother of King Hárekr. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. FJ pp. 343, 345; CV pp. 174-175, 347 s.v. frost, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolgríma For the first element Kol- see above. For the second element -gríma see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Kolgríma Beinisdóttir in ch. 98. A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 12; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 216, 347 s.v. gríma, kol; NR s.v. Kolla
Kolla Found in OW.Norse as the by-name Kolla, for which the etymology is uncertain but which may be related to OW.Norse kolla "female, woman". Kolla is also found as a short form of feminine names in Kol-. occurs in the runic nominative form kola. NR s.v. Kolla
Kolþerna For the first element Kol- see above. The second element may be related to Old Icelandic þerna, "maid-servant". A short form of feminine names in Kol- is Kolla. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. 347, 734 s.v. kol, þerna; NR s.v. Kolla
Kormlǫð Celtic, Gormlaith. This name appears in Landnámabók for Kormlǫð, daughter of Kjarvalr, an Irish king. GB pp. 13
Krafla While Geirr Bassi reports this as a woman's name, I've been unable to find other documentation contining this as a name. If it is a valid name, it may be related to Old Icelandic krafla, "to paw or scrabble with the hands", an infant's nickname. This is also the name of an Icelandic volcano. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 354 s.v. krafla
Kristín Christian name, a Norse form of Latin Christina. Found in Old Danish as Kristina, in Old Swedish as Kristina, Kirstin etc., and in OW.Norse as Kristín. Occurs in the runic nominative form kr(e)stin. A short form for Kristín is Kitta. GB pp. 13; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Kristín
Kristrún Christian. For the second element -rún see above. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rún; NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
 
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Name Notes Source
Langlíf Originally a nickname, "long-life". A few instances of Langlíf occurring as a personal name appear in Norway after 1200. Found in Denmark as Langliva from c. 1150. May be represented in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Langliuetorp (c. 1100's). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 184
Lauga Lauga is a short form of the name Guðlaug. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Leikný, Lekný, Lækný This name is related to the Old Icelandic word leika, "to play, sport; to delude, trick", also used in phrases such as "to be hag-ridden" in the sense of nightmares. Also related to the giantess' name Leikn, which was also used to mean "she-troll, ogress, sorceress". For the second element -ný see above. The name Lekný appears in Landnámabók for Lekný, mother of Þórgrímr and Finnr inn draumspakr ("dream-speaker") in ch. 73. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 382 s.v. leika, Leikn; NR s.v. -ný
Líf, Hlíf Originally a by-name. Possibly related to Old Icelandic hlífa, "to give shelter, to cover" and to hlífð, "defence, protection". The form Líf may be Hlíf with the initial h lost, or it may be related to Old Icelandic líf, "life". The name Hlíf appears in Landnámabók for Hlíf hestageldr ("horse-gelder") in ch. 27; Hlíf Hrólfsdóttir in ch. 66; and Hlíf Heðinsdóttir in ch. 68. The name Líf appears only in mythology. GB pp. 11; FJ pp. 188; CV pp. 271 s.v. hlífa, hlífð
Líknvé The first element Líkn- is from OW.Norse líkn "goodness, compassion, favor, help, solace". For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in the runic genitive form liknuiaR. NR s.v. Líknví, Líkn-, -ví
Lína Christian name. This name appears in Landnámabók for Lína, daughter of Þórleif Þórðardóttir in ch. 48. GB pp. 13
Línhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction. The first element lín- is related to Old Icelandic lín, "flax, linen". For the second element -hildr see above. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Linild (c. 1202). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 189, 345, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Ljót May derive from Old Icelandic *ljótr, "giving light" but may instead be related to Old Icelandic ljótr, "ugly". This name is often used in the sagas for an old, hag-like woman who is usually depicted as a seið-kona or witch. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ljót, mother of Hrolleifr inn mikli ("the great, the large") in ch. 58; Ljót Einarsdóttir in ch. 74; and Ljót, whose farm was at Ljótarstǫðum, in ch. 92. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 395-396 s.v. ljótr
Ljótunn For the first element Ljót- see above. For the second element -unn see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ljótunnr, the sister of Kolgrímr inn gamli ("the old") and wife of Bjǫrn gullberi ("gold-bearer") in ch. 19. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 350; CV pp. 395-396, 655 s.v. ljótr, unnr
Ljúfa Identical to Old Icelandic ljúfr, "dear, beloved; mild, gentle, kind". Found as a woman's name in western Iceland. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ljúfa, wife of Bjǫrn of Bjarnarfjǫrð, in ch. 53. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 396 s.v. ljúfr
Ljúfvina For the first element Ljúf- see above. The second element -vina is identical to Old Icelandic vinr, "friend". This name appears in Landnámabók for Ljúfvina, daughter of the king of Bjarmaland, in ch. 40. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 396, 709 s.v. ljúfr, vinr
Lofnheiðr The first element Lofn- is used as the name of the goddess Lofn, one of Frigga's handmaidens, known as the goddess of love. The name is akin to modern English "love". For the second element -heiðr see above. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247, 397 s.v. heiðr, Lofn
Lofthæna, Lopthæna The first element may be related to the masculine name Loptr, which appears in the Eddas as one of the names of Loki, and as a masculine human name in Landnámabók. The second element is identical with Old Icelandic hæna, "hen". This name appears in Landnámabók for Lofthæna Arinbjarnardóttir in ch. 22. The form Lofthæna appears in the legendary saga Ǫrvar-Odds saga, c. 1250, as the mother of Oddr. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 305, 398 s.v. hæna, Loptr
Lúta This name may perhaps be related to Old Icelandic lúta, "to lout, bow down; to kneel in Christian worship; to pay homage to". GB pp. 13; CV pp. 400 s.v. lúta
 
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Name Notes Source
Mábil This name appears in Landnámabók for Mábil, the wife of Helgi Hængsson, in ch. 91. GB pp. 13
Mær, MáR Found in OW.Norse as Mær. From the OW.Norse mær "maiden". occurs in the runic accusative form mai. NR s.v. MáR
Máfa   GB pp. 13
Magnhildr The first element Magn- or Mægin- is from OW.Norse magn "might, main, strength, power" or OW.Norse megin "might, main, strength, power," derived from Germanic *mazina-. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish as Magnhild and in OW.Norse as Magnhildr. These names appear to come from Germany. Found in the runic genitive form [ma(h)niltar]. NR s.v. Magnhildr, Magn-, -hildr
Máild   GB pp. 13
Málfríðr For the second element -fríðr see above. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Fríða
Mallymkun Celtic name. It is uncertain whether this is a masculine name or a feminine name. The first element, Mal-, is the Celtic word for "servant". The second element is perhaps the genitive case of a Celtic name, Lomchu. Occurs in the runic nominative form mal:lymkun. NR s.v. Mallymkun
Málmfríðr For the second element -fríðr see above. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; NR s.v. Fríða
Malmury Celtic name. It is uncertain whether this is a masculine name or a feminine name. The first element, Mal-, is the Celtic word for "servant". The second element is the Celtic genitive-case form (possessive) of Maria. Occurs in the runic accusative form mal:mury NR s.v. Malmury
Manga Manga is a short form for Margrét. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Mardǫll, Marþǫll Mardǫll appears in the Eddas as one of the names of the goddess Freyja. The word is also used as a common noun meaning "mermaid". GB pp. 13; CV pp. 412 s.v. Mardǫll
Margrét Christian, Margaret. A short form of this name in Old Norse is Manga. GB pp. 13; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Máría Christian, Mary, Maria GB pp. 13
Marína Christian GB pp. 13
Matthildr, Mattildr Christian name compounded from Matt- and -hildr. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h as in this name: see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Mæva This name appears in Landnámabók for Mæva Þórvarðardóttir in ch. 23. GB pp. 13
Melkorka Celtic. Melkorka appears as the slave-concubine of Hǫskuldr Dala-Kollsson in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) who is said to be an Irish princess. This name appears in Landnámabók for Melkorka, daughter of the Irish king Mýrkjartan in ch. 39. GB pp. 13
Mjaðveig The first element Mjað- comes from the stem of Old Icelandic mjǫdr, genitive mjaðar, "mead, honey-wine". For the second element -veig see above. CV pp. 433, 690 s.v. mjǫdr, veig; NR s.v. -væig
Mjǫll Identical with Old Icelandic mjǫll, "fresh, powdery snow". This name appears in Landnámabók for Mjǫll, daughter of Án bogsveigir ("bow-swayer") in ch. 56. GB pp. 13; CV pp 433 s.v. mjǫll
Móbil   GB pp. 13
Móða A short form of feminine names in -móð. Occurs in Old Danish as Motha and is found in the runic nominative form muþa. NR s.v. Móða
Móeiðr For the second element -eiðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Móeiðr, wife of Vestar Hængsson, in ch. 90; and Móeiðr Hildisdóttir in ch. 91. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247 s.v. heiðr
Molda   GB pp. 13
Mundgerðr, Mundgerða, Mundgærðr, Mungærðr The first element in this name is either Mun- or Mund-: both first elementes occur in Continental Germanic names. Names in Mun- are related to OW.Norse munr "mind, will." Names in Mund- are related to OW.Norse mund "hand; protection." Both first elementes are uncommon in Scandinavia; Mund- appears in OW.Norse Mundgerðr or Mundgerða and in Old Danish Munder. The first element Mun- appears only in the masculine name MunulfR. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. May occur in the runic nominative form [munkir]. NR s.v. Mun(d)gærðr, Mun-, Mund-, -gærðr
Myrgjǫl, Myrgjol Celtic name. Appears in the runic accusative form murkialu. This name appears in Landnámabók for Myrgjol, the daughter of the irish king Gljómalr in ch. 37. GB pp. 13; NR s.v. Myrgjǫl
Mýrún Celtic. This name appears in Landnámabók for Mýrún, daughter of the Irish king Maddaðr. GB pp. 13
 
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Name Notes Source
Nauma The name Nauma appears in the 14th century legendary saga Hálfdanar saga Eysteinssonar as the wife of King Sæmingr. CV p. 146 s.v. nauma, naumr
Nereiðr For the second element -eiðr see above. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 247 s.v. heiðr
Niðbjǫrg For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Niðbjǫrg, the daughter of King Bjólan and Kaðlín Gǫngu-Hrólfsdóttir, in ch. 32. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 66 s.v. bjǫrg
 
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Name Notes Source
Oddbjǫrg The first element Odd- is identical with Old Icelandic oddr, "point, weapon-point, spear-point, arrow-point." For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Oddbjǫrg Grímsdóttir in ch. 48. The name Oddbjǫrg appears in Hrafnkels saga freysgoða as the wife of Hrafnkel. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 66, 462 s.v. bjǫrg, oddr
Oddfríðr For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Oddfríðr, daughter of Helgi af Hvanneyri, in ch. 29. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. Fríða
Oddgerðr For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 197, 462 s.v. Gerðr, oddr
Oddkatla For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -katla see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 337, 462 s.v. ketill, oddr
Oddlaug For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 374, 462 s.v. laug def. IV, oddr
Oddleif For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -leif or -læif see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 350; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Oddný For the first element Odd see above. For the second element -ný see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Oddný Einarsdóttir in ch. 73; Oddný, daughter of Oddr inn mjóvi ("the slim") in chs. 92 and 94; Oddný daughter of Þórbjarnardóttir in ch. 95. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 462 s.v. oddr; NR s.v. -ný
Óðin-Dísa This name is formed from the woman's name Dísa, first elemented with an OW.Norse by-name from the name of the god Óðinn. Appears in the runic accusative form oþintisu. NR s.v. Óðin-Dísa, Dísa
Ólaug The first element Ó- is derived from the Primitive Scandinavian *Anu-, from *anuR "forefather, ancestor". For the second element -laug see above. May occur in the runic accusative form [oloh]. NR s.v. Ólaug, Ó-, -laug
Óleif, Ólæif A feminine variant of the masculine name ÓleifR or ÓlæifR, which is a side-form of ÓlafR. Runic examples include the nominative form [ulef] and the accusative forms olaif, [ulaif]. NR s.v. Ólæif, ÓlæifR, ÓlafR
Ǫlhildr The first element Ǫl- is identical with Old Icelandic ǫl, "ale". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 763 s.v. hildr, ǫl
Ólǫf This is a more modern spelling of the Old Norse name Álǫf, the feminine form of Óláfr. Occurs in Old Danish as Olof, in Old Swedish as Olaf or Olof, and in OW.Norse as Ólǫf. Runic examples include the nominative forms olauf, [olauf], uluf, the genitive forms auluafaR, ulaufR and the accusative forms olaf, [oloh], oluf, ulafu. This name appears twice in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Ólǫf Guðmundardóttir, granddaughter of Óláfr pái ("peacock"); and Ólǫf Þórsteinnsdóttir, the granddaughter of Unn in djúpúðga ("the deep-minded"). GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 342, 350; CV pp. 471 s.v. Óláfr; NR s.v. Ólǫf, ÓlafR
Ǫlrún For the first element Ǫl- see above. For the second element -rún see above. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. CV pp. 504, 763 s.v. rún, ǫl; NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
Ǫndótt Probably originally a by-name from the Old Icelandic adjective ǫndóttr, "looking full in the face, fiery-eyed". This name appears in Landnámabók for Ǫndóttr, sister of Ǫlvir barnakarl ("friend of children") in chs. 32, 40, and 63. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 764 s.v. ǫndóttr
Ormhildr The first element Orm- is identical with Old Icelandic ormr, "serpent, snake, dragon." For the second element -hildr see above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Ormhildur Hróarsdóttir in ch. 85. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 468-469 s.v. hildr, ormr
Ósk Identical with Old Icelandic ósk, "wish", the proper name is found in Landnámabók. Related to one of the names of the god Óðinn, Óski, and to a common epithet for the Valkyries, ósk-mær or "wish-maiden". In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) this name appears both for Ósk, the mother of Þórsteinn surts inn spaka (Thórsteinn Black the Wise) and granddaughter of Unn in djúpúðga ("the deep-minded"), and also for Ósk the daughter of Þórsteinn surts inn spaka. These same characters also appear in Landnámabók in chs. 33, 39 and 44. GB pp. 13; CV pp. 473 s.v. ósk, Óski, ósk-mær
Ótama Probably originally a by-name. From the OW.Norse adjective útamr "untamed". Appears in the runic nominative form [utaRa]. NR s.v.
Otkatla See -katla, above. This name appears in Landnámabók for Otkatla Þórðardóttir in ch. 48. GB pp. 13; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 337 s.v. ketill
  
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Name Notes Source
Ráðhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian palce-name Rathildayle (c. 1100-1200's). The first element Ráð- is identical with Old Icelandic ráð, "counsel, advice, rede". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 209, 345, 349; CV pp. 261, 485 s.v. hildr, ráð
Rafarta, Rafǫrta Celtic GB pp. 14
Rafnhildr, Hrafnhildr For the first element Rafn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. A few instances of this name are recorded in West Scandinavia. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-names Rauenhilbanc (c. 1209), Rauenylridding (c. 1320). FJ pp. 212, 349; CV pp. 261, 281 s.v. hildr, hrafn
Ragna A short form of feminine names in Ragn-. Appears in Old Danish as Regna, and in Old Swedish and OW.Norse as Ragna. Runic examples include the nominative forms ragna, rakn, rakna, [rana]. Ragna appears in Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) as a woman of distinction, the mistress of a farm on North Ronaldsay. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. Ragna, Ragn-
RagnalfR The first element Ragn- is related to Germanic *razina-, in Gothic ragin "counsel, decision", OW.Norse rǫgn, regin n. pl. "power, power of the gods". As a personal name element this word has the Germanic sense of "rede, counsel, decision", but in Scandinavia acquired a secondary meaning with the religious interpretation. May derive from either Germanic *ragn or the side-formen *rægin. For the second element -ælfR see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnælf. Runic examples include the nominative form raknilfR,/EM> and the accusative form rahnilfi. NR s.v. RagnælfR, Ragn-, AlfR, -alfR, -ælfR
Ragnbjǫrg For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg or -borg see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnborgh and in OW.Norse as Ragnbjǫrg. Occurs in the runic nominative form r-knburk. NR s.v. Ragnborg, Ragn-, -biǫrg/-borg
Ragnfríðr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Ragnfrith, in Old Swedish as Ragnfridh, and in OW.Norse as Ragnfríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms ragnfriR, rahnfriþ, ra(h)nfriþr, [rahnfriþr], the genitive forms rahnfriþ, raknfriþarrahnfriþi. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. Ragnfríðr, Ragn-, -fríðr, Fríða
Ragnheiðr, Ragneiðr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -eiðr see above. A short form of Ragneiðr is Ranka. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 247, 488-489 s.v. heiðr, regin
Ragnhildr, Ragnhilda For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish as Regnhild, in Old Swedish as Ragnhild or Ragnhilda, and in OW.Norse as Ragnhildr. The name Ragnhildr is common in Norway from the 800's onwards and is occasionally found in Iceland as well. The form Ragnhilda is common in Norway in the 1300-1400's. Frequently found in Sweden. Danish has Rægnhildr, which probably represents a loan from the Continental Germanic name Reinildis. Runic examples include the nominative forms rahniltr, rahn[ilt]r, raknhiltr and the genitive form rag[niltaR]. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Ragenilda (c. 1180-1204), Raenild (1185), Regenild (1202), Raginalda (c. 1220), Ragenil (c. 1230), Ragnilda (c. 1149-1181), Raganild (c. 1149-1181), Raganildis (c. 1149-1181), Ragnilde (c. 1149-1181) etc. Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) gives this as the name of one of the daughters of the Norwegian king Eiríkr blóðøx ("blood-ax"). A short form of Ragnhildr is Ranka. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 213-214, 345, 349; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 261, 488-489 s.v. hildr, regin; NR s.v. Ragnhildr, Ragn-, -hildr
Ragnvé For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Swedish as Ragnvi. Occurs in the runic accusative form ragnui. NR s.v. Ragnví, Ragn-, ví
Rannveig, Rǫgnveig For the first element Ragn- see above. Found in OW.Norse as Rannveig, Rǫgnveig. Runic examples are found in the nominative forms ranuaik, ranuauk and ronuig. NR s.v. Ragnvæig/Rannvæig, Ragn-, -væig
Ragnvǫr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form rahnuor. NR s.v. Ragnvǫr, Ragn-, -vǫr
Ragnþrúðr For the first element Ragn- see above. For the second element -þrúðr see above. Found in the runic nominative form raknþruþr. NR s.v. Ragnþrúðr, Ragn-, -þrúðr
Rakel Christian, Rachel. While Geirr Bassi shows this in his list of Old Norse names, it is quite a bit after the end of the Viking Age. Lind shows it in use no sooner than 1229 for Rachel cona Mass kumbalda and appearing as a matronymic byname for Þordur Rachelarson (c. 1397). GB pp. 14; Lind, E.H. Norsk-Isländska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn från Medeltiden (Uppsala & Leipzig: 1905-1915, sup. Oslo, Uppsala and Kobenhavn: 1931). Col. 844 S.n. Rakel.
Randalín Christian GB pp. 14
Randvé The first element Rand- is from OW.Norse rǫnd "shield." For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms ranti, ronti and the accusative forms rantui, [rantui]. NR s.v. Randví, Rand-, -ví
Ranka Ranka is used as a short form for the names Ragneiðr and Ragnhildr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Rannveig The first element Rann- is identical to Old Icelandic rann, "house" (related to the root in modern English ransack, "house-search"). For the second element -veig see above. The name Rannveig appears in Vápnfirðinga saga as the daughter of Lýtingr Ásbjarnarson. Another Rannveig appears in Þórsteins þáttr stangarhǫggs as the wife of Víga-Bjarni ("Killer-Bjarni"). GB pp. 14; CV pp. 483, 690 s.v. rann, veig; NR s.v. -væig
Reginleif The first element Regin- is identical to Old Icelandic regin, "ruling powers, the gods." For the second element -leif or -læif see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 345, 350; CV pp. 488-489 s.v. regin; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Ríkuláta Originally a by-name meaning "the proud one". A single instance of this is found as a by-name in West Scandinavia in the 800's. See also the name Ríkilát in Jarlmanns saga ok Hermanns. May occur in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Rikelot (1202). FJ pp. 218
Ríkvé The first element Rík- is from the OW.Norse adjective ríkr and the Germanic *ríkia-, "mighty, distinguished, rich". For the second element -vé or -ví see above. May occur in the runic nominative form rikui. NR s.v. Ríkví, Rík-, -ví
Rjúpa Although Geirr Bassi Haraldsson identifies this as a proper name, the word is the noun rjúpa, "ptarmigan", and is used in Landnámabók as a woman's nick-name, not a proper name. GB pp. 14; CV pp. 501 s.v. rjúpa
Róta Occurs in OW.Norse as the mythological name Róta, from the OW.Norse verb róta "to stir, overturn, tear; bring disorder". This name also is found in a runic inscription in the nominative form rota. NR s.v. Róta
Rúna Short form of feminine names in Rún- or -rún. Found in Old Swedish as Runa and in OW.Norse for a mythological character. Runic examples include the nominative forms runa, [runa], runo and the accusative form runu. NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
Rúnfríðr The first element Rún- is from OW.Norse rún, which is derived from Germanic *rúnó in the original sense of "secret, hidden knowledge". For the second element -fríðr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form runfriþ. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Rúnfríðr, Rún-, -fríðr, Fríða

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Name Notes Source
Salbjǫrg The first element Sal- is identical with Old Icelandic salr, "hall, house". For the second element -bjǫrg see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 66, 510 s.v. bjǫrg, salr
Saldís For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -dís see above. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 510 s.v. dís, salr
Salgerðr For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346, 349; CV pp. 197, 510 s.v. Gerðr, salr
Salvǫr For the first element Sal- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346, 351-352; CV pp. 510 s.v. salr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Sæhildr The first element Sæ- is identical to Old Icelandic sær, "sea". For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346, 349; CV pp. 261, 618 s.v. hildr, sær
Sæuðr, Sæunn For the first element Sæ- see above. For the second element second element -unnr or the older form -uðr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 618 s.v. sær, unnr
Sandey The first element Sand- is from OW.Norse sandr "sand". For the second element -ey or -øy see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form santau. NR s.v. Sandøy, Sand-, øy
Sásgerðr This name is a variant form of Ásgerðr (Ásgærðr, Æsgerðr, Æsgærðr). The origin of the initial S-sound is perhaps from children's speech. occurs in the runic nominative form soskiriþr. NR s.v. Sásgærðr, Ás-/Æsgærðr, -gærðr
Sefa This is the feminine equivalent to the masculine names Sefi or Siafi, which are from the Old Swedish adjectives siæver, sæver "calm, self-possessed, tranquil, gentle, leisurely". Runic examples include the nominative form sifa and the genitive form sifuR. NR s.v. Sefa, Sefi/Siafi
Sesilída Christian, Cecily GB pp. 14
Sibba Sibba is a short form of the name Sigbjǫrg, Sigbiǫrg. Occurs in the runic genitive form sibu. NR s.v. Sibba
Síða Probably originally a by-name, this name is derived from OW.Norse síða "side". A runic example occurs in the genitive case as s(in)-u. NR s.v. Síða
Sigbjǫrg The first element Sig- comes from OW.Norse sigr (Genitive: sigrs), which is derived from Germanic *seziz, *sezuz, "victory, conquest". For the second element -bjǫrg see above. Found in Old Danish as Sighburgh, in Old Swedish as Sighborgh and in OW.Norse as Sigbjǫrg. Occurs in the runic nominative form sigbiurg. A short form of Sigbjǫrg is Sibba. NR s.v. Sigbiǫrg, Sig-, -biǫrg/-borg
Sigga A short form for women's names in Sig-. A few instances of this name are found in Norway and it appears in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Sige (pre-1195), Sigga (pre-1195 to 1202). FJ pp. 231, 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr
Siggunnr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Occurs in the runic genitive form shunar. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Siggunnr, Sig-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Siglaug For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Found in Old Swedish as Sighløgh. Occurs in the runic nominative forms sihlauh and siklaug. NR s.v. Siglaug, Sig-, -laug
Signý For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -ný see above. Occurs in Old Danish as Sighni, in Old Swedish as Sighne and in OW.Norse as Signý. Found in the runic nominative form sikni. Cleasby-Vigfusson states that this name found in Landnámabók comes from the name of the goddess Sigyn, the wife of Loki. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr, Sigyn; NR s.v. Signý, Sig-, -ný
Sigríðr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element comes from -fríðr, see above. This name was very common in Norway and Iceland through the whole medieval period. Also common in Sweden and frequent in Denmark. Found in Old Danish as Sighrith, in Old Swedish as Sighfridh or Sighridh and in OW.Norse as Sigríðr. Runic examples occur in the nominative case as sikriR, sikriþ, si[k]riþr, si[kr]iþr, siriþ, siri(þ), [siriþ], [siri(þ)], siriþr, siriþ..., the genitive case forms siriþaR, sirþaR and the accusative case forms [sifriþ], siriþ(in)R. Anglo-Scandinavian forms may include Sigreth (1143-1147), Sirid (1185), Sigherith (c. 1200), Sigerith (c. early 1200's), Sigrida (1202), Sigerithe (c. 1200-1254), Syrith (1245), Sigreda, Segrida etc. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga This name appears in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, as Sigríðr Sigurðsdóttir, who married Þórólfr Kveldulfsson. Sigríðr, wife of Þórsteinn of Lysufjord, appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 234-235, 346, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 527-528 s.v. sigr; NR s.v. Sigríðr, Sig-, -fríðr, Fríða
Sigrlaug For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -laug see above. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 374, 527-528 s.v. laug def. IV, sigr
Sigrún For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -rún see above. Found in Old Swedish as Sighrun and in OW.Norse as Sigrún. Occurs in the runic nominative form sirun and the accusative form sikrun. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 504, 527-528 s.v. rún, sigr; NR s.v. Sigrún, Sig-, -rún
Sigunnr For the first element Sig- see above. Found in the runic genitive case form shunar. NR s.v. Sigunnr, Sig-, -unnr/-uðr
Sigveig For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -veig or -væig see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigveig. Occurs in the runic nominative form sikuik. NR s.v. Sigvæig, Sig-, -væig
Sigvǫr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigvǫr. Occurs in the runic genitive form skuaraR. NR s.v. Sigvǫr, Sig-, -vǫr
Sigþrúðr, Sigrúðr For the first element Sig- see above. For the second element -þrúðr see above. Found in OW.Norse as Sigþrúðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms sigruþ and sikruþr. A short form for women's names in Sig- is Sigga. A short form for names in -þrúða is Þrúða. A short form for Sigþrúðr is Sissa. FJ pp. 346; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV p. 527-528, 747 s.v. sigr, Þrúðr, Þrúða; NR s.v. Sig(þ)rúðr, Sig-, -þrúðr
Sissa Sissa is a short-form for the name Sigþrúðr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Skálphæna The first element possibly comes from Old Icelandic skálp, which is literally "scullery-water, dish-water" but which metaphorically is applied to gossip, i.e., the kind of talk women do while scrubbing. The second element is identical with Old Icelandic hæna, "hen". The name is found in Landnámabók, and I think is likely to have started out as a nickname. CV pp. 305, 542 s.v. hæna, skálp
Skírlaug The first element Skír- is from the OW.Norse adjective skírr "clean, pure, clear, bright". This first element does not appear to originate as a Scandinavian name element, but rather is an import from either OH.Germ. or Old English. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form [skirlauh]. NR s.v. Skírlaug, Skír-, -laug
Skjaldfríðr This is a hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Scelfride, Sceldfrithe (c. 1100-1400's). The first element Skjald- is identical with Old Icelandic skjǫld, genitive skjaldar, "shield." For the second element -fríðr see above. A short-form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. FJ pp. 250, 346, 348; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 553 s.v. skjǫld; NR s.v. , Fríða
Skjaldvǫr For the first element Skjald- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. A number of instances of this name are recorded in Norway. May be present in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Scelduuare, Seldwar (c. 1200-1330). GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 250, 346, 351-352; CV pp. 553 s.v. skjǫld; NR s.v. -vǫr
Snælaug, Snjólaug, Sniólaug The first element Snæ- is derived from Primitive Scandinavian *snaiwaR, related to Old Icelandic snær, "snow". There are several forms of the word, including snær, snjár, and snjór. Most proper names are compounded in the oldest form of snær, however this name is also found with the later spelling Snjólaug, Sniólaug. For the second element -laug see above. Found in OW.Norse as Snælaug. Occurs in the runic nominative form sniolauk. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 374, 577 s.v. laug def. IV, snær; NR s.v. Sniólaug, Snió-/Snøy-, -laug
Snotra Snotra is the name of one of the goddesses mentioned in Gylfaginning in The Prose Edda, where she is named as the thirteenth among the ásynjur or goddesses: "She is wise and courteous. From her name a woman or a man who is a wise person is called snotr". The name Snotra also appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of one of the daughters of ridiculously ignorant family - the saga says she is called Snotra because she is the brightest. All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjǫtra, Hjǫtra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV p. 576 s.v. snotr, Snotra
Sǫlva   GB pp. 15
Sólveig, Sǫlveig The first element Sól- is perhaps from Old Norse sól, "the sun", or from sǫlr, "sun-colored, yellow, sallow". For the second element -veig see above. GB pp. 14; CV pp. 579, 621, 690 s.v. sól, sǫlr, veig; NR s.v. -væig
Sólvǫr, Sǫlvǫr For the first element Sól-, Sǫl- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. GB pp. 14; FJ pp. 351-352; CV pp. 579, 621 s.v. sól, sǫlr; NR s.v. -vǫr
Sóma Feminine name from OW.Norse sómi "honor, respect." occurs in the runic accusative form somu. NR s.v. Sóma
Sævǫr The first element Sæ- or Søy- is from OW.Norse sjár, sjór, sær which are derived from Primitive Scandinavian *saiwaR, "sea, ocean". Found in the runic genitive form saufaraR. For the second element -vǫr see above. NR s.v. Søyvǫr, Sæ-/Søy-, -vǫr
Spana Possibly related to Old Icelandic spana, "to provoke, to allure". GB pp. 14; CV pp. 580, 582 s.v. spana, spenja
Stafnhildr, Stafnhilda Hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian construction, possibly found in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Stauenilde (c. 1200). The first element Stafn- is related to Old Icelandic stafn, "the stem of a ship, prow". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 262, 346, 349; CV pp. 261, 586 s.v. hildr, stafn
Steina, Stæina Appears in Old Swedish as Stena. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stæin-. Occurs in the runic accusative form steinu. NR s.v. Stæina, Stæin-
Steinbjǫrg The first element Stein- is identical with Old Icelandic steinn, "a stone". For the second element -bjǫrg or -borg see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenborgh and in OW.Norse as Steinbjǫrg. Runic examples include the nominative forms stainbog, [stainbroþ], [stinburk]. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stæin- is Steina, Stæina. NR s.v. Stæinborg, Stæin-, -biǫrg/-borg
Steinfríðr, Steinríðr For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenfridh and in OW.Norse as Steinfríðr or Steinríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms stinfriþr, stnfriþ, st[yn]friþ and the accusative form stanfriþi. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stæin- is Steina, Stæina. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Stæinfríðr, Stæin-, -fríðr, Fríða
Steinhildr For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Stenhild. Runic examples include the nominative case forms steniltr, stineltr, stniltr. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stæin- is Steina, Stæina. NR s.v. Stæinhildr, Stæin-, -hildr
Steinlaug For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form steinlauk. A short form of feminine names in Stein-, Stæin- is Steina, Stæina. NR s.v. Stæinlaug, Stæin-, -laug
Steinnvǫr, Steinvǫr, Steinor For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. This name is common in both Norway and in Iceland, often in the form Steinor. Steinvǫr hófgyðja ("temple-priestess"), a relative of Brodd-Helgi ("Spike-Helgi"), appears in Vápnfirðinga saga. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 265, 346, 351-352; CV pp. 591 s.v. steinn; NR s.v. -vǫr
Steinunn, Steinuðr For the first element Stein- see above. For the second element second element -unnr or the older form -uðr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 346; CV pp. 591, 655 s.v. steinn, unnr
Stynfríðr The name-element Styn- (perhaps from OW.Norse stynr "groan") is not well-known except in this name and in the masculine name Stynbjǫrn. For the second element -fríðr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form st[yn]friþ. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Stynfríðr, -fríðr, Fríða
Sunnifa This is a Scandinavianized form of Old English Sunngifu. Legend has it that this was the name of an Irish Christian queen who fled to Norway, where she died. The name is common in Norway in the 1200's. The name is found, but very infrequently, in Iceland, Sweden, and Denmark. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 271-272
Svala This name is taken from the bird, "swallow". May occur in the Anglo-Scandinavian name Swale (1185). Found as a woman's proper name in Bandamanna saga. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 273; CV pp. 606 s.v. svala
Svana This name is related to Old Icelandic svanr, "swan" and possibly also to Old Icelandic svanni, a poetic word used to mean "lady". GB pp. 15; CV pp. 606 s.v. svanr, svanni
Svanhildr For the first element Svan- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 606 s.v. hildr, svanr, svanni
Svanlaug For the first element Svan- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 374, 606 s.v. laug def. IV, svanr, svanni
Sveina Found in Old Swedish as Svena. A short form of feminine names in Svein-, Svæin-. The first element Svein- or Svæin- is from OW.Norse sveinn "youth, young person, young man." Occurs in the runic nominative form suina. NR s.v. Svæina, Svæin-
Sveinheiðr For the first element Svein- or Svæin- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Found in the runic nominative form [sueiniþ]. A short form of feminine names in Svein-, Svæin- Sveina or Svæina. NR s.v. Svæin-, -hæiðr
Svínhildr A hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian formation, possibly found in the Anglo-Scandinavian names Suinild, Swynild (c. 1220-1234). The first element Svín- is identical with Old Icelandic svín, "swine, pig". For the second element -hildr see above. FJ pp. 283, 349; CV pp. 261 s.v. hildr
Sylgja The name Sylgja appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the name of Herrauð's mother. It is possibly identical with the Old Icelandic sylgja, "brooch". CV pp. 614 s.v. sylgja
Systa This name is derived from OW.Norse systir "sister." Found in the runic accusative form systu. NR s.v. Systa

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Name Notes Source
Tíðfríðr Found in Old Swedish as Tifridh. The first element Tíð- is from OW.Norse tíð "time", often found as the first element Tý- in Old West Norse names. A related term corresponding to this name element seems not to exist in Continental Germanic but is common in Old English. For the second element -fríðr see above. Runic examples include the nominative form [tiþfr]iþ and the accusative form [tifrit]. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Tíðfríðr, -fríðr, Fríða
Tobba Tobba is a short-form for the name Þórbjǫrg. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Tófa Found in Old Danish as Tova, in Old Swedish as Tova and in Old West Norse as Tófa. Frequent in both Old Danish and Old Swedish. This name is found as a short form of names such as Þórfríðr. Cleasby-Vigfusson states that this name is related to German zóbe, "a handmaiden". Runic examples include the nominative forms tufa, tuf(a), (t)ufa, [tufa] and the accusative forms tufu, [tofu]. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 638 s.v. Tófa, NR s.v. Tófa
Tóka Found in Old Danish as Toka, may occur in Old West Norse as Tóka. This name is the feminine equivalent to the masculine name Tóki, which is a short form of Þórkell, Þórketill or may also represent a compund with the second element -ki added to names in Þór-/Þúr- (Þýr-). The feminine name Tóka is also found as a short form of OW.Norse Þórkatla. Runic examples include the nominative case [tuka] and the accusative case toku. NR s.v. Tóka
Tóla Found in Old Danish as Tola, in Old Swedish as Tola, and appears as in OW.Norse as a fictional character, Tolla. This usually occurs as an East Scandinavian name, and is found frequently in Danish. Tóla is a short form of names in Þórl- such as Þórlaug or Þórlǫf. Runic examples include the nominative forms tola, tula, [tula], [tul(a)]. FJ pp. 288; NR s.v. Tóla
Tonna This name is a short form of the woman's name Þórný. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Tonna. Also found as an Anglo-Scandinavian name (ca. 1220-1225). Runic examples include the nominative form tuna and the accusative forms [(t)on(o)], ton(u). FJ pp. 288; NR s.v. Tonna
Tóra This name is a short form of feminine names in Þór-/Þúr-. Occurs in the runic nominative forms [tora] and tura. NR s.v. Tóra, Þór-/Þúr-
Torfa Proper name from Landnámabók. Perhaps related to Old Icelandic torf, "turf, sod". CV pp. 636-637 s.v. torf, Torfa
Totra Snotra appears in the legendary saga Gautreks saga, c. late 1200's, as the name of the mother of a ridiculously ignorant family - the saga says she is called Totra because she would not wear any clothes which were not in tatters. The name is related to Old Icelandic tæta, "to tear to shreds" and tætingr, "tatters, shreds". All the names in this family rhyme (Totra, Fjǫtra, Hjǫtra, Snotra) and it is unlikely that any except Snotra were used outside of fiction or nicknames. CV p. 647 s.v. tæta, tætingr

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Name Notes Source
Uðr, Unnr, Auðr Appears as a feminine proper name in Landnámabók and Laxdæla saga. Uðr is an older form of this word. The three forms of the name are used interchangably, for instance Auðr in djúpauðga ("the deep-minded") is called Auðr in Landnámabók, but Unnr or Uðr in Laxdæla saga. The name Unn appears in the legendary late 13th century Gautreks saga as the mother of Starkaðr. GB pp. 15; CV pp. 648, 655 s.v. Uðr, unnr
Úlfeiðr, Úlfheiðr The first element Úlf- is identical to Old Icelandic úlfr, "wolf". For the second element -eiðr see above. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 247, 668 s.v. heiðr, úlfr
Úlfhildr For the first element Úlf- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Ulfhild, and in OW.Norse as Úlfhildr. Occurs in the runic nominative form [olfil](r). FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 668 s.v. hildr, úlfr; NR s.v. Úlfhildr, Ulf-, -hildr
Úlfrún For the first element Úlf- see above. For the second element -rún see above. A short form of names in Rún- or -rún is Runa. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 350-351; CV pp. 504 s.v. rún; NR s.v. Rúna, Rún-, -rún
Una, Unna Found in Old Danish as Una, and in in Old Swedish and OW.Norse as Una, Unna. The runic examples should be interpreted as Una, from the OW.Norse verb una "to enjoy, be happy with, be content". Runic examples include the nominative form una and the accusative form unu. GB pp. 15; NR s.v. Una/Unna
Undrlaug The first element is from OW.Norse undr "under". A correspondence to this name element seems not to exist in the Germanic languages. Since there is no evidence that a simple name *Laug existed, the first element cannot reasonably be interpreted as a first elemented by-name. For the second element -laug see above. Runic examples include the nominative form untrlauh and the genitive form utrlaukar. CV pp. 374 s.v. laug def. IV; NR s.v. Undrlaug, -laug
Unnr Found in OW.Norse as Unnr. From Old West Norse unnr "to wave, billow, roll, undulate" or identical to the second element -unnr/-uðr. A runic example may occur in the runic nominative form u=n/n=u. NR s.v. Unnr, -unnr/-uðr
Úrsúla Christian, Ursula GB pp. 15

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Name Notes Source
Vætildr, Vethildr In Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, the Vinland explorers capture two skræling boys, who reveal their mother's name to be Vætildr or Vethildr. This would, if correct, have to be a Norse understanding and rendering of an Algonquin or Beothuk name.  
Valdís The first element Val- is of uncertain origin. It may come from Primitive Germanic *walha-, meaning "Celtic, Welsh, foreign" or Primitive Germanic *wala-, Old Icelandic valr "the dead on a battlefield" as found in the word valkyrja. For the second element -dís see above. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 675, 676 s.v. dís, Valir, valr
Valgerðr For the first element Val- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. A short form of Valgerðr is Valka. GB pp. 15; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 197, 675, 676 s.v. Gerðr, Valir, valr
Valka Valka is a short form for Valgerðr. CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
VéalfR The first element Vé- is identical with Old Icelandic , "temple, sanctuary" and related to Gothic weihs, "holy". For the second element -ælfR see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form uielf/uielf=r. NR s.v. VíælfR, VíælfR; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Vébjǫrg For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg, -borg see above.Found in Old Danish as Wiburgh, in Old Swedish as Viborgh, and in OW.Norse as a fictional character Vébjǫrg. Runic examples include the nominative forms uibug, uiburk and the accusative forms uiborg, uibruk. NR s.v. Víborg, Ví-, -biǫrg/-borg; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Védís For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name is found in Landnámabók, of a woman with family members with names in the same first element: Végestr and Vémundr. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 687 s.v. dís,
Vefríðr For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Wifrith and in OW.Norse as Véfríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms uifir, uifiriR, uifriþ, uifriþr and the genitive form uifrþaR. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Vífríðr, Ví-, -fríðr; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Végunnr For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Runic examples include the nominative forms uikuntr, uikuþr, uikuþ.... A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. NR s.v. Víguðr/-gundr, Ví-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Végerðr For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -gærðr or -gerðr see above. Found in Old Swedish as Vigærdh and in OW.Norse as Végerðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms uiker, uikr and the genitive form uikerþaR. NR s.v. Vígærðr, Ví-, -gærðr; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Vélaug For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 374, 687 s.v. laug def. IV,
Véný For the first element Vé- see above. For the second element -ný see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 687 s.v. ; NR s.v. -ný
Véreiðr For the first element Vé-, Ví- see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Vérún For the first element Ví-, Vé- see above. For the second element -rún see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form uerun. NR s.v. Vírún, Ví-, -rún; CV pp. 687 s.v.
Vígdís The first element Víg- is identical to Old Icelandic víg, "battle, strife". For the second element -dís see above. Appears as both the name of a human woman in Landnámabók and as the name of one of the valkyries. In Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) Vígdís Hallsteinsdóttir is the wife of Víga-Hrappr ("Killer-Hrappr"), while Vígdís Ingjaldsdóttir is the granddaughter of Óláfr feilan ("wolf-cub") and wife of Þórðr goddi. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 715 s.v. dís, víg
Vilborg The first element Vil- is identical to Old Icelandic vil, "will, liking, favor". For the second element -borg see above. GB pp. 16; CV pp. 66, 705 s.v. bjǫrg, vil
Vilgerðr For the first element Vil- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 197, 705 s.v. Gerðr, vil
  
y
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Name Notes Source
Ynghildr, Yngvildr The first element Yng- or Yngv- is probably related to the name Yngvi-Freyr, the founder of the Yngling line (Ynglingasaga), and may be related to names for the god Freyr. For the second element -hildr see above. The second element -hildr appears frequently in women's names, sometimes without the aspirate h see above. Yngvildr, a descendant of Karlsefni and mother of Bishop Brandr is mentioned in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, and in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395). GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 349; CV pp. 261, 726 s.v. hildr, Yngvi, Yngvi-Freyr
Yngvǫldr For the first element Yng- see above. Yngvǫldr appears as a woman's name in Landnámabók. CV pp. 726 s.v. Yngvi, Yngvi-Freyr
Yrsa, Ýri, Ýrr   GB pp. 16
 
Þ
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  Þ 
Name Notes Source
Þjóðbjǫrg Found in Old West Norse as Þjóðbjǫrg or Þióðbiǫrg. The first element Þjóð-, Þiúð- is from OW.Norse þjóð "folk, people". For the second element -bjǫrg see above. Runic examples include the nominative form þiuþburh and the accusative form [þiauburi-]. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347; CV pp. 66, 739 s.v. bjǫrg, þjóð; NR s.v. Þiúðborg, Þiúð-, -biǫrg/-borg
Þjóðgerðr For the first element Þjóð- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 197, 739 s.v. Gerðr, þjóð; NR s.v. Þiúð-
Þjóðheiðr For the first element Þjóð-, Þiúð- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form þiuþreiþr. NR s.v. Þiúðhæiðr, Þiúð-, -hæiðr
Þjóðhildr For the first element Þjóð- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. This name is found in Landnámabók. In Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, and in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395), Þjóðhildr is the name of Eirík's wife, who was famous for her early conversion to Christianity and for building the first church in Greenland. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 739 s.v. hildr, þjóð; NR s.v. Þiúð-
Þjóðvé For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Occurs in the runic nominative forms þiauþui, þiauþui(r). NR s.v. Þiúðví, Þiúð-, -ví
Þóra The feminine uncompounded form of the Old Icelandic name element þóra-, from Þórr, god of thunder. Þóra appears also as a short form of names in þór-. Common in both Norway and in Iceland from the earliest times onward, also frequent in Swedish and Danish. Found in Old Danish as Thora, Thura, in Old Swedish as Thora, and in OW.Norse as Þóra. Runic exampls include the nominative forms þora, [þora], þura, [þura], the genitive forms [þoru], þru, þuru and the accusative forms þoru, þuru. In Orkneyingasaga (c. 1200) Þóra Sumarliðisdóttir appears as the wife of Earl Erlend and the mother of St. Magnus. Þóra borgarhjǫrtr ("town-hart") appears in the legendary saga Bósa saga og Herrauðs, c. 1300, as the wife of Ragnar Loðbrokkr. Another Þóra appears in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, Þóra hlaðhǫnd ("lace-cuff"), who eloped with Bjǫrn Bjarnarsson. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr; NR s.v. Þóra
Þórarna The first element Þór- is identical to the Old Icelandic Þórr, the god of thunder. In modern usage the vowel is long (Þór-) before vowels h or d, but short (Þor-) before consonants, however it is thought that the long vowel occurred always during the Viking Age. The second element -arna is either from arinn, "hearth" or more likely from arin, related to Old Icelandic ǫrn, "eagle". A few instances are recorded in Norway, one in the 800s, and the name is frequent in Iceland, though it is not found in East Scandinavia. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 300, 347, 348; CV pp. 743, 767 s.v. Þórr, ǫrn
Þórbjǫrg For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -bjǫrg see above. This name appears twice in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Þórbjǫrg, the daughter of Ármóðr and the second wife of Hrútr Herjólfsson; and Þórbjǫrg digra ("stout"), daughter of Óláfr pái ("peacock"). In Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, Þórbjǫrg knarrarbringa ("ship-breasted") is the mother of Þjóðhildr, the wife of Eiríkr rauðr ("the red"); Þórbjǫrg lítilvǫlva ("little prophetess") also appears in the saga as an itenerant sybil. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. A short form of Þórbjǫrg is Tobba. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 66, 743 s.v. bjǫrg, Þórr
Þórdís For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -dís see above. This name appears three times in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Þórdís Óláfsdóttir, daughter of Óláfr feilan ("wolf-cub") and wife of Þórarinn; Þórdís Snorradóttir, daughter of Snorri goða ("priest") and wife of Bolli Bollasson; and Þórdís Þjóðólfsdóttir, wife of Ósvífr Helgason and mother of Gudrun. The name Þórdís appears in Vápnfirðinga saga as the wife of Lýtingr Ásbjarnarson, and also the wife of Helgi Ásbjarnarson. Another Þórdís is mentioned in Hrafnkels saga freysgoða and in Egils saga Skallagrímssonar (c. 1230), the daughter of Þórolfr Skallagrímsson. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. A short-form for names in -dís is Dísa. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 100, 743 s.v. dís, Þórr
Þórelfr For the first element Þór- see above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Þórey For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -ey or -øy see above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 134, 743 s.v. ey, Þórr
Þórfinna For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -finna see above. Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Þórfinna Vermundardóttir, grandaughter of Óláfr pái ("peacock") and wife of Þórsteinn Kuggason. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 348; CV pp. 154, 743 s.v. finnr, Þórr
Þórfríða For the first element Þór- see above. The second element -fríða is the weak side-form of -fríðr, see above. Occurs as a Scandinavian name in England. Found in the runic nominative form þurfi(r)iþa. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Þórfríða, Þór-/Þúr-, -fríðr, Fríða
Þórfríðr, Þúríðr For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -fríðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorfred, Thorith, found in OW.Norse as Þúríðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms þeriþr, [þurfrikr], þurfriþ, þurfriþr, þuriþ, found in the case as þurufiriþi and in the accusative case as þou(r)riþi. A short form of Þórfríðr is Tófa. A short form of names in Fríð-, -fríðr is Fríða. NR s.v. Þórfríðr/Þúríðr, Þór-/Þúr-, -fríðr, Fríða
Þórgerðr For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -gerðr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorgard, in Old Swedish as Thorgærdh and in OW.Norse as Þórgerðr. Runic examples include the nominative forms þorker, þorkir, þukir, þurkairþ|, þurkarþr, þurkir, the genitive forms [þorkerþa], þorkerþaR, [þo]r[*kiai]rþ[in] and the accusative forms þurkirþi, þur*kirþu. Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) twice: Þórgerðr the daughter of Egill Skallagrímsson and wife of Óláfr pái ("peacock"); and Þórgerðr Þórsteinnsdóttir, daughter of Þórsteinn rauða ("the red"), wife of first Dala-Kollr, then Herjólfr, and mother of Hǫskuldr Dala-Kollsson and Hrútr Herjólfsson. A woman called Þórgerðr silfra ("the silver") appears in Vápnfirðinga saga. Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu and Egils saga Skallagrímssonar, c. 1230, mention Þórgerðr Egilsdóttir, child of the famous Egill Skallagrímsson and sister to Þòrsteinn Egilsson. Þórgerðr, the wife of Herjólfr Bardarson and mother of Bjarni Herjólfsson appears in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395). A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 197, 743 s.v. Þórr, Gerðr; NR s.v. Þórgærðr, Þór-/Þúr-, -gærðr
Þórgríma For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -gríma see above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 216, 743 s.v. gríma, Þórr
Þórgunnr For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -gunnr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorgun, Thrugun, in Old Swedish as Thorgun, and in OW.Norse as Þórgunnr. Runic examples include the nominative þorgun, þorkun, (þ)(o)rkuþr, þurgutr, þurkun, þurkunr, þurkuntr, þurkutr, þurkutru, [þurkuþr] and the dative form þurkuni. Þórgunna, a woman from the Hebridies, appears in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, as the mother of Leifr Eiríksson's illigitimate son Þórgils, and it is suggested that she is the same Þòrgunna who appears in Eyrbyggja saga, though the chronology between the two sagas cannot be reconciled. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. A short-form of names in Gunn- or -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr is Gunna. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 221, 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr, gunnr; NR s.v. Þórgunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Þór-/Þúr-, -gunnr/-guðr/-gundr, Gunna
Þórhalla For the first element Þór- see above. The second element -halla is identical to Old Icelandic hallr, "flat stone, big stone, boulder". Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Þórhalla in málga ("the gossip"), a servant on the farm of Ósvífr Helgason. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 344, 347; CV pp. 235, 743 s.v. Þórr, hallr
Þórheiðr For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -heiðr or -hæiðr see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form þureiþ. NR s.v. Þórhæiðr, Þór-/Þúr-, -hæiðr
Þórhildr, Þórhilda For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -hildr see above. Several instances of this name are recorded in Iceland from the time of the Landnám, which indicates that the name must have been known in Norway as well, though it is not recorded there. It is also found in Sweden and Denmark. Found in Old Danish as Thorhild and in OW.Norse as Þórhildr. May occur in the runic nominative forms [þorilþ], þoril-. Possibly present in the Anglo-Scandinavian place-name Durildewell (c. 1205). A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 307, 347, 349; CV pp. 261, 743 s.v. Þórr, hildr; NR s.v. Þórhildr, Þór-/Þúr-, -hildr
Þórkatla For the first element Þór- see above. See -katla, above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. A short form of þórkatla is Tóka. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347, 349; CV pp. 337, 743 s.v. Þórr, ketill; NR s.v. Tóka
Þórlaug For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -laug see above. Several insteances of this name are found in Iceland, but after the 900s the name does not appear in Norway again until the 1400s. A few insteances are recorded in Sweden as Thorløgh. A short form of names in Þórl- is Tóla, while a short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 311, 347; CV pp. 374, 743 s.v. Þórr, laug def. IV
Þórleif For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -leif or -læif see above. A short form of names in Þórl- is Tóla, while a short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 347, 350; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr; NR s.v. -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Þórljót For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -ljótr see above. A short form of names in Þórl- is Tóla, while a short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 288, 296, 347, 350; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Þórlǫf For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -leif, -læif, -lǫf see above. Found in Old Danish and in Old Swedish as Thorlof. Occurs in the runic nominative form þurluf. NR s.v. Þórlǫf, Þór-/Þúr-, -læif/-lǫf, -læifR/-lafR
Þórný For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -ný see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form þurni. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. A short form of Þórný is Tonna GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; NR s.v. Þórný, Þór-/Þúr-, -ný, Tonna
Þórodda For the first element Þór- see above. The second element -odda is identical to Old Icelandic oddr, "point, weapon-point, spear-point, arrow-point." A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 345, 347, 350; CV pp. 462, 743 s.v. oddr, Þórr
Þórunn For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -unn see above. Found in Old Danish Thorun, in Old Swedish Thorun and in OW.Norse Þórunnr. Runic examples include the nominative forms þorun, þoruþr, þurun, þurunr, þuruþr and the genitive form þurunaR. Appears in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245) as Þórunn hyrna ("horn"), daughter of Ketill flatnefr ("flat-nose") and wife of Helgi inn magri ("the lean"). Two other women named Þórunn appear in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, and in Grænlendinga saga (1382-1395), one as the descendant of Karlsefni and mother of Bishop Bjǫrn, the other as Karlsefni's mother. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 655, 743 s.v. unnr, Þórr; NR s.v. Þórunnr/-uðr, Þór-/Þúr-, -unnr/-uðr
Þórvé, Þýri, Þórví, Þýrví For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -vé or -ví see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorwe, Thyrwi and in OW.Norse as Þorvé, Þyri. Runic examples include the nominative forms þerui, þirui, þuri, þurui, [þyrui], the genitive form þuruiaR and the accusative forms þourui, þurui. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 687, 743 s.v. , Þórr; NR s.v. Þýrví/Þórvi, Þór-/Þúr-, -ví
Þórveig See Þór- above. For the second element -veig see above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 690, 743 s.v. veig, Þórr; NR s.v. -væig
Þórvia For the first element Þór- see above. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 16; FJ pp. 296, 347; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Þórvǫr For the first element Þór- see above. For the second element -vǫr see above. Found in Old Danish as Thorwar and in OW.Norse as Þórvǫr. Occurs in the runic accusative form þoruar. A short form of women's names in þór- is Þóra or Tóra. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 296, 347, 351-352; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr; NR s.v. Þórvǫr, Þór-/Þúr-, -vǫr
Þraslaug For the second element -laug see above. GB pp. 17; CV pp. 743 s.v. laug def. IV
Þrúða Short form of names in -þrúðr. GB pp. 17; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV p. 747 s.v. Þrúðr
Þrúðr Þrúðr was the daughter of the god Thórr and the goddess Sif, but also appears as a human name and in compounds. GB pp. 17; CV p. 747 s.v. Þrúðr
Þrúðrún For the first element Þrúð- see above. For the second element -rún see above. Occurs in the runic nominative form þruþrun. NR s.v. Þrúðrún, Þrúð-, -rún
Þura Þura is a short form of the name Þuríðr CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"
Þuríðr, Þóríðr Þuríðr is a weakened form of Þóríðr. See Þór- above. The second element -ríðr is of uncertain origin. This name appears four times in Laxdæla saga (c. 1245): Þuríðr the daughter of Ásgeirr æðikollr ("the hot-head"); Þuríðr Eyvindardóttir, sister of Helgi inn magri ("the lean") and wife of Þórsteinn rauðr ("the red"); Þuríðr the daughter of Hǫskuldr Dala-Kollsson; and Þuríðr the daughter of Óláfr pái ("peacock"). Another Þuríðr appears as the daughter of Oddr Onundarson in Hænsa-Þóris saga. There is another Þuríðr in Eiríks saga rauða, c. late 1100's, the daughter of Eyvindr austmann ("the easterner or Norwegian") and sister of Helgi inn magri. Gunnlaugs saga ormstungu mentions Þuríðr dylla ("sow-thistle"), daughter of the title character and mother of Illugi svarti ("the black"). A short form of Þuríðr is Þura. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 347, 350; CV pp. xxxiv s.v. "Pet Names"; CV pp. 743 s.v. Þórr
Þyra, Thyra, Þýri Cleasby-Vigfusson says that Þyri is a weakened form of Þórvé, or the even older form Þórveig. The name occurs in modern Danish as Þyra or Thyra. See Þór- above. For the second element -veig see above. Fellows-Jenson claims that the second element in Þyri is actually from Primitive Scandinavian wig, "battle". Found in Old Danish as Thorwe, Thyrwi and in OW.Norse as Þorvé, Þyri. Runic examples include the nominative forms þerui, þirui, þuri, þurui, [þyrui], the genitive form þuruiaR and the accusative forms þourui, þurui. This name is extremely common in Denmark from early times onward, including in the runic inscription turui. Found in Sweden as well, including the runic inscription Þurvi. Also found in West Scandinavia. GB pp. 17; FJ pp. 319, 347; CV pp. 690, 743 s.v. veig, Þórr; NR s.v. Þýrví/Þórvi, Þór-/Þúr-, -ví, -væig
Þyrna Of uncertain etymology. Occurs in the runic nominative form [turno]. NR s.v. Þyrna
Þyrnni   GB pp. 17
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